Fort Hood News Archive

Story by U.S. Army Master Sgt. Miriam Espinoza, 1st Cavalry Division Public Affairs

Mr. John Kaneshiro, the son of former U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Edward Kaneshiro, receives the Medal of Honor from the president Joseph R. Biden in the East Room at the White House in Washington, D.C., July 5, 2022. Mr. Kaneshiro is receiving the award on behalf of his father’s acts of gallantry and intrepidity above and beyond the call of duty while serving as an Infantry Squad Leader with Troop C, 1st Squadron, 9th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division near Phu Huu 2, Kim Son Valley, Republic of Vietnam. On July 25, 1963, Kaneshiro was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross for his actions. On July 21, 2020, the Secretary of the Army recommended the upgrade of his award to the Medal of Honor. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Henry Villarama)

FORT HOOD, Texas — President Joe Biden awarded the Medal of Honor to Staff Sgt. Edward N. Kaneshiro Jul. 5 during a ceremony at the White House in Washington D.C. Kaneshiro, now the 1st Cavalry Division’s 44th Medal of Honor recipient, was assigned to C. Troop, 1st Squadron, 9th Cavalry Regiment during the Vietnam War.

Kaneshiro’s award was presented to his son John Kaneshiro, who followed his dad’s footsteps joining the Army as a non-commissioned officer and reaching the rank of Master Sgt. before retiring.

John, who was only four months old when his father deployed to Vietnam, said it was the shared experience of wearing the uniform of the United States that helped bring him closer to his father, who he did not get an opportunity to know while growing up.

1st Cavalry Division’s command team; Maj. Gen. John B. Richardson IV, commanding general, and Command Sgt. Maj. Shade Munday, division command sergeant major, attended the ceremony to support Kaneshiro’s family and honor his service and sacrifice.

“It’s an honor to be here in support of the Kaneshiro family and to represent the 19,000 Troopers from the 1st Cavalry Division during this historic moment,” said Munday. “His heroic actions will inspire the division’s young troopers, past and present, to be better than they were yesterday and to lead by example as Staff Sgt. Kaneshiro did when he was called upon to defend his country.”

During a mission in the Kim Son Valley, Vietnam, in December 1966, Kaneshiro’s unit came under fire from North Vietnamese Troops. Kaneshiro crawled forward to attack, using six grenades and an M16 rifle. His brave actions saved the lives of U.S. Soldiers and resulted in success for the next mission of Army forces.

“Our vision in the division is to have a fit, disciplined, well trained, cohesive team trained to fight and win our wars,” said Maj. Gen. John B. Richardson IV, commanding general, 1st Cavalry Division.  “And what Staff Sgt. Kaneshiro did for us is role model that, he put those words into actions.”   Kaneshiro’s daughter, Noemi, who was 10 years old when he deployed to Vietnam, said growing up without a father and seeing the effect on their mother was difficult; however, she is proud of their father’s display of courage and determination during combat in Vietnam.

Kaneshiro was born in Honolulu, HI, the 8th of 16 siblings he graduated from high school and worked on the family farm until he joined the U.S. Army in 1959. He fathered five children with his wife; and in July 1966 he deployed to Vietnam when his oldest child was 10 years old and his youngest was only four months.

Following the White House ceremony, Kaneshiro was inducted into the Pentagon’s Hall of Heroes, during a second ceremony the next day, where Noemi was presented with a portrait of her father along with  the Medal of Honor flag. Several key defense department leaders attended the Hall of Heroes ceremony including  Secretary of the Army Christine Wormuth, Secretary of Defense Lloyd Austin, Vice Chief of Staff of the Army Gen. Joseph M. Martin, and Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Mark A. Milley.

During her speech about the four Medal of Honor recipients being recognized Wormuth   said “In the moments that mattered most, these men made the choice time and time again to step forward, they reached deep into their personal reserves of faith, values, and training and in the most dangerous situations they mustered the strength to prevail.”

Kaneshiro served as a squad leader as part of the Blues unit, a unit that took the flight to the enemy. When the enemy was drawn out of their hiding spot, his unit was called to go in and look for the fight.

After months of intense fighting and countless acts of heroism, Kaneshiro was ultimately killed by the enemy in March 1967.

Kaneshiro left behind his wife Mitsuko, and their five children. Mitsuko passed away on April 10, 2022, less than three months from the Medal of Honor presentation, she was 90 years old.

“Staff Sgt. Kaneshiro showed courage and strength in an incredibly dangerous situation, said Lt. Col. James Ray, commander, 1-9 CAV. “His acts of heroism and gallantry serve as an incredible example. We are grateful for his sacrifice and bravery.”

Staff Sgt. Edward Kaneshiro, Medal of Honor recipient. (Congressional Medal of Honor Society)
Former Staff Sgt. Edward Kaneshiro is inducted to the Pentagon’s Hall of Heroes at Conmy Hall on Joint Base Myer-Henderson Hall in Arlington, Virginia, July 6, 2022. The inductees included retired Maj. John Duffy, former Spc. 5 Dwight Birdwell, Spc. 5 Dennis Fujii, Staff Sgt. Edward Kaneshiro, Col. Ralph Puckett and Sgt. Maj. Thomas Payne. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Henry Villarama)
Former Staff Sgt. Edward Kaneshiro is inducted to the Pentagon’s Hall of Heroes at Conmy Hall on Joint Base Myer-Henderson Hall in Arlington, Virginia, July 6, 2022. The inductees included retired Maj. John Duffy, former Spc. 5 Dwight Birdwell, Spc. 5 Dennis Fujii, Staff Sgt. Edward Kaneshiro, Col. Ralph Puckett and Sgt. Maj. Thomas Payne. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Henry Villarama)

 

“Staff Sgt. Kaneshiro showed courage and strength in an incredibly dangerous situation, said Lt. Col. James Ray, commander, 1-9 CAV. “His acts of heroism and gallantry serve as an incredible example. We are grateful for his sacrifice and bravery.”

Story by U.S. Army Sgt. Brayton Daniel, 1st Cavalry Division Public Affairs Office

Cpt. Aaron Mills, commander, Headquarters and Headquarters Troop, 4th Squadron, 9th Cavalry Regiment, Sgt. Maj. Rocio Picazarri, 1st Medical Brigade operations sergeant major, and Staff Sgt. Justin Schaffer, 1st Medical Brigade schools non-commissioned officer, were recognized for executing on the spot cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) to a Trooper in distress at Fort Hood, Texas, July 11.  (U.S. Army Photo by Spc. Cheyne Hanoski, 1st Cavalry Division Public Affairs Office)

FORT HOOD, TX – Three Soldiers are being hailed as heroes for providing immediate aid and saving the life of a Trooper in distress while running along Legends Way at Fort Hood, Texas, July 11.
Cpt. Aaron Mills, commander, Headquarters and Headquarters Troop, 4th Squadron, 9th Cavalry Regiment, Sgt. Maj. Rocio Picazarri, 1st Medical Brigade operations sergeant major, and Staff Sgt. Justin Schaffer, 1st Medical Brigade schools non-commissioned officer, executed on the spot cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) to a Trooper in distress.
Mills, Picazarri, and Schaffer were running along Legends Way when they noticed a fallen Trooper on the side of the road. Upon approach they realized the Trooper was unresponsive with no pulse.
“We were told he had been unconscious for some time,” said Picazarri. “We immediately began to perform CPR while informing the surrounding Troopers to call 911, and the quick response time is really what helped the situation.”
After several minutes of the three Troopers performing CPR the Fire Chief arrived at the scene.
“Finally the Fire Chief arrived at the scene,” said Picazarri. “The fire chief checked for a pulse and this time there was a pulse.”
After briefing the first responders on what had happened the Trooper was loaded into the ambulance and transported to Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center.
“Today we are recognizing leaders for taking action,” said Maj. Gen. John B. Richardson, 1st Cavalry Division commanding general. “This morning that is exactly what happened, and these three leaders saved a life.”
The Soldiers were presented with an impact Meritorious Service Medal (MSM) for their ability to take action and apply training to save a Trooper’s life when called upon by the 1CD commanding general.
“The Trooper is extremely lucky to be alive,” said Command Sgt. Maj. Shade S. Munday, 1CD command sergeant major. “Leaders take action, and that’s exactly what these Soldiers did to save the Trooper’s life.”

Staff Sgt. Justin Schaffer is awarded an impact Meritorious Service Medal by Maj. Gen. John B. Richardson, 1st Cavalry Division commanding general, for his ability to take action and apply training to save a Trooper’s life at Fort Hood, Texas, July 11. (U.S. Army Photo by Spc. Cheyne Hanoski, 1st Cavalry Division Public Affairs Office)
Maj. Gen. John B. Richardson, 1st Cavalry Division commanding general, recognizes three Soldiers for their ability to take action as a leader and save the life of a Trooper at Fort Hood, Texas, July 11.  (U.S. Army Photo by Spc. Cheyne Hanoski, 1st Cavalry Division Public Affairs Office)

The Trooper is now awake and responsive thanks to 1CD Troopers who were prepared when the situation called upon them.

Story and Photos by Sgt. Broderick Hennington, 1st Cavalry Division public affairs

Maj. Gen. John Richardson, 1st Cavalry Division commander, awards Staff Sgt. Katrisha Jansen, career counselor, with 1st Battalion 12th Regiment, 3rd Armored Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division, with the Meritorious Service Medal for her role in reaching the retention goal for this fiscal year, July 11, 2022, on Fort Hood, Texas.  “She’s passionate about her job and she’s passionate about helping you all,” said Maj. Gen. Richardson. “You have a career counselor who will get the assignment for you. Whatever you need, she will find it. She seeks things out and doesn’t wait for things to happen.”

FORT HOOD, Texas– Recruiting new Soldiers is a vital function for maintaining the world’s premier volunteer military force, the U.S. Army, but equally important is retaining its most highly qualified Soldiers.

The Army recently missed its recruiting goal by several thousand, making retention of current Soldiers even more important.

“There is an equal relationship between recruiters and career counselors to make the Army’s retention a success,” Staff Sgt. Katrisha Jansen, career counselor, with 1st Squadron, 12th Cavalry Regiment, 3rd Armored Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division said. “When they struggle, we struggle. I feel we’re picking up the slack, but we are working together find what’s missing.”
The Army provides benefits healthcare, education and other benefits for Soldiers and their Families. It also provides enlistment incentives.

Those characteristics have driven the Army’s ability to meet recruiting goals, but a competitive civilian sector, which is now offering many of the same benefits, is competing with the military for highly qualified recruits and talent.

Jansen, a native of Eureka, Illinois, excels at identifying highly qualified Troopers within 1-12th’s formation and meeting their needs to continue their military career.

“Joining the Army is a big decision,” said Jansen. “It’s our responsibility as career counselors to help them fully understand everything the Army has to offer them. We sit down with the Soldier and identify what works best for them.”

Jansen is nearing ten months as a career counselor, and she takes pride in doing whatever is possible to assist 1st CAV Troopers complete their reenlistment.

“A Soldier who had just become the custodial parent for his son wanted to change his Military Occupational Specialty,” Jansen said. “We worked together for three months to find something that would work for him as a single father. I was thrilled to help him because the entire process was out of love for his son.”

Although Jansen is still learning her position, she still excels. Her desire to help Soldiers has enabled her to achieve, and surpass her retention goal in June, four months before the target date.

“Staff Sgt. Jansen closing her mission this early shows how hardworking and dedicated she is to the Soldiers of 1-12 CAV,” said Staff Sgt. Kendall Howard, 1st Cavalry Division junior retention operations Noncommissioned Officer. “This fiscal year’s requirement has proved to be very difficult for other units throughout the Army. However, she pressed on and got it done.”

Jansen was awarded the Meritorious Service Medal July 11,2022, by, Maj. Gen. John Richardson, commanding general, 1st Cavalry Division, for her role in reaching the retention goal for this fiscal year, which is 56 personnel.

During Jansen’s award ceremony, Maj. Gen. John Richardson praised Jansen for her work as he addressed the 1-12 CAV formation.

“She’s passionate about her job and she’s passionate about helping you all,” said Maj. Gen. John Richardson. “You have a career counselor who will get the assignment for you. Whatever you need, she will find it. She seeks things out and doesn’t wait for things to happen.”

Although this is Jansen’s accomplishment, she relishes in acknowledging the support she continues to receive from the 1-12 CAV Troopers and leadership.

“It was the Soldiers,” Jansen said. “The Soldiers in the 1-12th are great. They know what they want, and we do what we make it work. Secondly, the support from the command teams was amazing. They want their Soldiers to succeed.”

Staff Sgt. Katrisha Jansen, career counselor, with 1st Battalion 12th Regiment, 3rd Armored Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division, stands after receiving the Meritorious Service Medal for her role in reaching the retention goal for this fiscal year, July 11, 2022, on Fort Hood, Texas. Maj. Gen. John Richardson, 1st Cavalry Division commander, awarded Jansen the Meritorious Service Medal after 1-12 CAV achieved its retention goal of 56 personnel in June, four months before required.
Staff Sgt. Katrisha Jansen, career counselor, with 1st Battalion 12th Regiment, 3rd Armored Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division, stands after receiving the Meritorious Service Medal for her role in reaching the retention goal for this fiscal year, July 11, 2022, on Fort Hood, Texas. Maj. Gen. John Richardson, 1st Cavalry Division commander, awarded Jansen the Meritorious Service Medal after 1-12th CAV achieved its retention goal of 56 personnel in June, four months before required.

 

 

FORT HOOD, Texas – The 13th Expeditionary Sustainment Command will host a change of command ceremony, passing the colors and command mantle from Brig. Gen. Ronald R. Ragin to Brig. Gen. Sean P. Davis on Friday, 15 July at 8:30 a.m. at Sadowski Parade Field, Fort Hood, Texas.

Ragin will relinquish command after commanding the 13th ESC for two years. Davis is coming to the 13th ESC from the 1st Theater Sustainment Command, where he served as the deputy commander, in Fort Knox, Kentucky.

Ragin will be taking over for Maj. Gen. Rodney D. Fogg as the Deputy Chief of Staff for Logistics and Operations at the United States Army Materiel Command, at Redstone Arsenal, Alabama.

Ragin has been noted in recent media for his positive impact on mothers and female soldiers within the unit, as well as his Green Company and People First initiatives.  He leaves a legacy behind in 13th ESC which impacted the unit, the III Armored Corps, and the Army.

Media desiring to cover this event must RSVP to 1st Lt. Francesca Hamilton at Francesca.d.hamilton.mil@army.mil no later than 12:00 p.m. on July 14, 2022 with your name, phone number, and outlet affiliation. .

1st Lt. Francesca Hamilton will meet the attending media at the south parking lot of Marvin Leath Visitors Center located on T. J. Mills Blvd. at 8:00 a.m. for an escort to the event.

In the event of adverse weather, the ceremony will take place in Abrams Gym.

 

Troopers from the 1st Cavalry Division Horse Cavalry Detachment perform a ‘Cavalry Charge’ at the 3rd Armored Brigade Combat Team’s change of command ceremony. The purpose of the Cavalry Charge during the ceremony is a way to honor the historic roots of the 1CD.

The incoming commander for the 3rd Armored Brigade Combat Team, Col. John B. Gilliam,  speaks to the soldiers and families attending the 3ABCT change of command ceremony. A change of command ceremony allows the incoming commander a fresh start and closure for the outgoing commander.

The outgoing commander for the 3rd Armored Brigade Combat Team, Col. Justin Y. Reese,  says his final goodbyes to the soldiers of 3ABCT during the change of command ceremony. Col. Reese relinquished command to Col. John B. Gilliam after 2 years in command.

Troopers from the 3rd Armored Brigade Combat Team deliver gifts to the incoming commander, Col. John B. Gilliam’s family, during the 3ABCT change of command ceremony. The gifts were a way to welcome Col. Guilliam and his family to the unit.

Commanding general of the 1st Cavalry Division and incoming commander of the 3rd Armored Brigade Combat Team, Col. John. B Gilliam, along with the outgoing commander of 3ABCT, Col. Justin Y. Reese, perform an inspection of the 3ABCT troopers. The inspection is conducted to ensure the incoming commander that the troops are well-trained and have overall achieved readiness.

FORT HOOD, Texas – The 3rd Armored Brigade Combat Team held a change of command and color casing ceremony on Jun. 30. After nearly two years in command, Col. Justin Y. Reese relinquished command of 3ABCT to Col. John B. Gilliam.

 

“The list of accomplishments in the Greywolf Brigade are endless,” said Maj. Gen. John B. Richardson IV, 1st Cavalry Division commanding general as he praised Reese for commanding the brigade through one of the most successful National Training Center rotations in recent history. “This brigade took the fight to the 11th Armored Battalion Regiment, relentlessly pursuing the opposing forces with an authentic spirit of the CAV.”

 

During Reeses’ command, he led the brigade through challenging times including transitions in leadership, COVID-19, and the integration of modern war fighting vehicles and equipment. He will relocate to Grafenwoehr, Germany this summer where he will take command of the 7th Army Training Center.

 

Reese was tasked with building well-trained cohesive teams at the squad, platoon, and company levels across the Greywolf brigade. Last March, Reese led the brigade through a rigorous NTC rotation where they were able to test their combined arms capability using new vehicles and equipment including the M1A2 SEPV3 Abrams tanks and JLTVs.

 

“Col. Reese produced the most aggressive and tactically proficient battalion task forces I have ever witnessed at the NTC in my 31 years of war fighting, said Richardson. “He provided a positive command climate that grew adaptive leaders who displayed that agility and home station training at NTC.”

 

“To the officers, NCOs, and Troopers of Greywolf, I am proud to have had the privilege to hang with the pack,” said Reese as he addressed the unit for the final time. “You are really good at what you are supposed to be good at. You are ready to do whatever the nation asks of you. Trust each other, have confidence in each other, and never forget your sacred responsibility to each other. With all my heart, thank you for your continued service.”

 

The incoming Greywolf commander, Col. John Gilliam, previously served with the 1st CAV Division as a battalion commander in 1st Battalion, 66th Armor, 3rd ArBCT, 4th Infantry Division, deploying to Atlantic Resolve in 2017.

 

Following the official change of command ceremony, the brigade and its battalions cased their colors in preparation for the upcoming deployment in support of Europe Command. Gilliam will be charged with deploying 3ABCT to Europe to support NATO allies and partners.

 

“It’s your individual and collective task to create great moments,” said Gilliam, “Show our allies how strong and effective a well-led ABCT can be and show our adversaries the folly of testing the U.S. Army. It will be a hell of a ride, and I look forward to serving with each of you.”

 

The 3rd Armored Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division, “GREYWOLF,” was first established on 29 August 1917 and fought in major campaigns of World War II and the Vietnam War- receiving multiple battle streamers and honors over those decades. In 1996, the brigade became the U.S. Army’s first, no-notice brigade-sized deployment to Kuwait in support of Operation Desert Strike, and during the Global War on Terrorism, GREYWOLF deployed five times to Iraq. Most recently, while stationed at Fort Hood, Texas, the Brigade has trained continuously for the full spectrum of conflict and worked extensively with Allies and partners overseas. Today, the GREYWOLF Brigade is trained, disciplined, and ready to deploy anywhere in the world with the most modern armor vehicles and equipment in the U.S. Army inventory.

UPDATE: All lanes have reopened to traffic at the Bernie Beck Main Gate.

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06:11 a.m. July 8, 2022

FORT HOOD, Texas — The Bernie Beck (Access Control Point #1) Main gate is currently closed until further notice to all inbound traffic due to ongoing maintenance on traffic control barriers.

It is not known when the inbound lanes will re-open. Drivers are being rerouted to alternate entry gates. The outbound lanes are open at this time.

Updates will be made here and on the U.S. Army Garrison Facebook Page as the work is completed.

 

By Michael M. Novogradac, U.S. Army Operational Test Command Public Affairs

WEST FORT HOOD, Texas – (June 30, 2022) Friends, family, and workers of the unit charged with testing equipment to make sure Soldiers fight with the best gear possible held its change of command ceremony Thursday.

“My son George is an Infantryman deployed to the Horn of Africa,” said incoming U.S. Army Operational Test Command Commander Col. George C. Hackler. “I sleep better at night now, knowing that OTC is here ensuring that our Soldiers receive the best equipment.”

Hackler thanked OTC’s higher headquarters’ ceremony host for the opportunity to serve at OTC.

He told Maj. Gen. James J. Gallivan, commander of the U.S. Army Test and Evaluation Command, “It is obvious in my short interactions here, that everyone in this command truly believes in the mission and does everything they can to make sure it happens. I have been utterly impressed with the workforce here.”

Hackler said he is looking forward to working with Fort Hood’s community partners of Florence, Killeen, Copperas Cove, Harker Heights, Belton and Gatesville.

Hackler also recognized his wife, daughter, and daughter-in-law, telling them, “Once again I have asked you to pick up, leave your friends, quit jobs, you flew halfway across the country.

“No complaining, no hesitation, everyone gets up and goes, and I know this one has been rough, but I appreciate your love, your support. We would not be where we are at right now without your dedication and hard work; so, thank you.”

After touting outgoing Commander Brig. Gen. David W. Gardner’s success at accomplishing 149 equipment tests during his tenure, Gallivan said, “His actions enabled Soldiers and leaders to have an active role and clear voice in providing operational feedback to the requirements community, acquisition community and Army senior leaders on the readiness of material solutions to enter the force.”

Gallivan spoke of the 24 critical technologies being delivered to Soldiers by 2023 that Army senior leaders talk about.

He rattled off a few significant tests, including the Abrams main battle tank and Bradley Fighting Vehicle upgrades, Mobile Protected Firepower, Joint Light Tactical Vehicle, the Infantry Squad Vehicle, Army Integrated Air and Missile Defense, Leader Manpack Radios, and the Integrated Visual Augmentation System, to name just a few.

“As we speak,” Gallivan said, “Today, the Army’s Integrated Personnel System limited user test is underway at over 20 locations in the lower 48; the 3rd Infantry Division at Fort Stewart, Georgia – they’re on the line of departure as we speak to test the Army’s replacement for the 113 (Armored Personnel Carrier) – the AMPV (Armored Multi-Purpose Vehicle). The Army National Guard in Wisconsin is on the line of departure right now to test the UH-60V Blackhawk!

“That’s happening as we sit here today. That’s what OTC does for your Army.”

The ATEC commander said Gardner strengthened ties and continued to foster partnerships with Texas A&M University, the University of Texas Center for Agile Technology, and Texas A&M Center for Applied Technology.

During his time at the speaker’s podium, Gardner praised the workforce, comprised of almost 800 Soldiers, Civilians and Contractors that serve at OTC.

“Despite one of our greatest challenges – Covid-19 – the members of OTC have still found a way to support testing of every Army modernization significant effort, every program under defense oversight, and every system that will find its way into the hands of our Army’s Soldiers soon,” said Gardner.

“The OTC workforce has conducted these tests despite an increased speed of modernization. OTC has been able to accomplish all of this because of the quality of our people.”

~~

About the U.S. Army Operational Test Command:

As the Army’s only independent operational tester, OTC enlists the “Total Army” (Active, National Guard, and Reserve) when testing Army, joint, and multi-service warfighting systems in realistic operational environments, using typical Soldiers to determine whether the systems are effective, suitable, and survivable. OTC is required by public law to test major systems before they are fielded to its ultimate customer – the American Soldier.

Story by: U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Broderick Hennington

FORT HOOD, Texas – On Friday morning, June 24th, during a ceremony on Cooper Field. Lt. Col. Sam Pearson III assumed command of the 6th Battalion, 56th Air Defense Artillery, Division Artillery, 1st Cavalry Division, which received orders to re-activate this summer to provide air defense capabilities to the division.

Lt. Col. Sam Pearson III, incoming commander for the newly re-activated 6th Battalion, 56th Air Defense Artillery battalion presides over the passing of troops and the colors during the assumption of command ceremony on Cooper Field, Fort Hood, TX, June 24. (U.S. Army photo by: Sgt. Broderick Hennington)

During his remarks, Pearson commended his formation for their hard work, dedication, and effort throughout this historic undertaking.

“Today marks a page in Air Defense history as we activate the first Maneuver-Short Range Air Defense Battalion within a Division,” Pearson said with a smile on his face. “I would also be remiss if I did not thank the Soldiers, NCOs and Officers that have worked tirelessly toward the goal of building 6-56 from the ground up.”

The activation of the 6th Battalion, 56th Regiment includes the fielding of the Mobile Short Range Air Defense System (M-SHORAD) and is part will aid in defending the division and subordinate units against the threat of enemy aircraft, drones and cruise missiles.

“This is a huge day for the First Team,” said Col. Neil Snyder, Division Artillery commander, 1st Cavalry Division. This ceremony marks a step forward for the division. Today we get more modern and more lethal. M-SHORAD, is a new capability, which brings a new formation and a new platform.”

This activation ceremony is also significant because it is the first time the battalion colors have been uncased since it was deactivated in Germany.

According to the previous Air Defense Artillery School commandant, most SHORAD battalions in the active component were deactivated a decade ago to support the formation of maneuver brigade combat teams to support counter-insurgency operations.

The arrival of this new battalion brings unique capabilities to the Division Artillery Brigade and will enable the division to dominate across multiple domains on the battlefield.

“I may be a field artilleryman by training and profession, but I’m a believer in air defense,” said Snyder. “I believe this formation will be the most lethal formation in the division. Soon the 1st CAV will not just win with fire support and dominate on the ground, but also own the air.”

As the ceremony concluded, Pearson reminded his Troopers that there is more to be done, and he excited to be in the fight with the most modern armored division in the U.S. Army.

1st Cavalry Division Troopers uncase the colors for the newly re-activated 6th Battalion, 56th Air Defense Artillery battalion during an assumption of command ceremony on Cooper Field, TX, June 24. (U.S. Army photo by: Sgt. Broderick Hennington)

“Change is constant, and with change we must adapt,” Pearson concluded. “The 6-56 is placed at the cutting edge of change in Air Defense. As our adversaries continue to hone their skills in conflicts across the globe, so too must we refine our skill set and capabilities to defeat our adversaries and win our Nation’s wars. I look forward to witnessing the history you Soldiers write for this storied battalion. First Team, Win with Fires, Night Hides Not!”

Over the next few years, the 1st Cavalry Division will modernize as a warfighting unit to include redesigning the division headquarters, armored brigade combat teams, engineer units and artillery formations. The division has already begun integrating modern warfighting equipment including M1A2SEPV3 tanks, M109A7 Paladins and the Joint Light Tactical Vehicle, all of which will increase the division’s capability and maneuverability during large scale combat operations against near-peer adversaries.

 

Story by: U.S. Army Capt. Christopher Buys

FORT HOOD, Texas – The 1st Cavalry Division published a standards book called the “Yellow Book” on June 21 at Fort Hood, Texas to outline standards for both

Division Command Sergeant Major Shade S. Munday observes noncommissioned officers conducting in-ranks inspections in each of the battalion training areas across the 1st Cavalry Division footprint during Foundational Day training on June 24, 2022. (U.S. Army photo by: 1st Cavalry Division Public Affairs office)

Troopers and Leaders regarding topics covered in U.S. Army regulations, directives and policies.

“I truly believe this Standards Book will make our great units even better by educating Troopers of what is expected and more importantly, empowering our NCO Corps.” said Maj. Gen. John B. Richardson IV, 1st Cavalry Division commanding general. “We are the greatest Army in the history of the world because of our incredible NCO Corps, the Standard Bearers of our Army.”

The Yellow Book is not a new concept for many that have served across the Army, and it is not even a new concept at Fort Hood. III Armored Corps historically maintained a standards book as well. However, this most recent publication of a standards book includes a non-punitive policy on cell phones for members of the First Team. This policy was designed to protect the off-duty hours of the division’s Troopers and spend uninterrupted time with their families and friends.

The Yellow Book for the 1st Cavalry Division is unique in that it outlines very specific and unique guidelines that do not exist elsewhere. The manual outlines proper wear of the Stetson, spurs, the full-color shoulder sleeve insignia, as well as standards for the proper execution of training within the greater Fort Hood area. Though all leaders are expected to not only uphold, but also enforce these standards, the primary audience for the guide is to empower the Noncommissioned Officers of the First Team.

“Our Non-commissioned Officers are the ‘Backbone’ of the Army and therefore are charged with ensuring that our Troopers uphold the highest of standards; the same standards that make the NCO Corps the most efficient and disciplined force in the Word,” said Command Sgt. Maj. Shade S. Munday, 1st Cavalry Division command sergeant major.

After training sessions led by unit leaders, all available Troopers in the division participated in a check on learning assessment during a division-wide foundational day.

The assessment, while challenging, proved to be no match for the professional knowledge of the Troopers of the CAV. As of publication, the overwhelming majority of Troopers passed the test on their first attempt. A common theme from many junior NCOs was that the new Yellow Book will serve as a great tool as they train and lead small units, teams, and crews in America’s First Team.

To learn more about the Yellow Book please visit https://www.army.mil/1stcav#org-the-yellow-book

FORT HOOD, Texas – Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center administrative offices and clinics will modify hours July 1-4 in observance of the Independence Day Federal Holiday.

Outpatient clinics including Community-Based Medical Homes will be open for scheduled appointments Friday, July 1. Beneficiaries are encouraged to keep their scheduled appointments.

The hospital remains open every day for emergency services, inpatient care, and labor and delivery services.

Monroe and Bennett Health clinics will be closed Friday, July 1. Active Duty Service members enrolled to either of those clinics should seek care at Thomas Moore Health clinic.  All other clinics and services will be open.

 COVID-19 Vaccination and Testing
All COVID-19 vaccination and testing is now performed at Primary Care Clinics or Community-Based Medical Homes. Please contact your primary care clinic or community-based medical home through secure messaging at patientportal.mhsgenesis.health.mil, or by phone to schedule your vaccination or test.

At-Home COVID-19 Test Kits are now available for those ages 2 years and older who are enrolled at CRDAMC Internal Medicine, Pediatrics, Family Medicine Clinics and Community-Based Medical Homes. Stop by during business hours to receive your test kit.

Pharmacies

Friday, July 1
Bennett and Monroe pharmacies will be closed.
All other pharmacies normal operating hours.

Saturday, July 2
Clear Creek PX Pharmacy
9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
All other pharmacies closed.

Monday, July 4
All pharmacies closed.

All CRDAMC clinics and pharmacies will resume normal operations on Tuesday, July 5.

TRICARE Prime enrollees with urgent, emergent care needs or COVID-19 symptoms should seek assistant at the CRDAMC Emergency Department.

The Nurse Advice Line is available 24/7 by calling (800) TRICARE or 1- 800- 874-2273, Option 1. Individuals living in the Fort Hood area entitled to military healthcare may talk to registered nurses about urgent health issues, guidance on non-emergency situations, and information about self-care for injuries or illnesses.

Beneficiaries can make or cancel appointments through the Patient Portal at patientportal.mhsgenesis.health.mil  or by calling Patient Appointment Service at 254-288-8888. You can make and cancel appointments through the Patient Portal as well as request, pharmacy refills, and access health information like laboratory results, radiology results, and immunization records.