Fort Hood News Archive

PHOTO UPDATE: Fort Hood residents enjoy free BBQ courtesy of Cowboys 4 Heroes.

Beauden Delaney, son of Staff Sgt. Brendan Delaney, 1st Cavalry Division, chooses a free pumpkin to take home during Fort Hood’s Fall Festival, which was held alongside of Togetherness Day and Cowboys 4 Heroes Oct. 16. (U.S. Army photo by Brandy Cruz, Fort Hood Public Affairs.)
Darran Markham with Guadalupe Red from Center Point scoops out homemade peach cobbler, while Spc. Dahnia Smith, Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center, grabs a cup to try during the free Cowboys 4 Heroes event at Fort Hood’s Fall Festival and Togetherness Day Oct. 16.
Anna and Ruth Johnson, daughters of Maj. Andrew Johnson, Operational Test Command, paint on some pieces of wood during the Togetherness Day event, which was held in conjunction with the Fall Festival and Cowboys 4 Heroes Oct. 16. (U.S. Army photo by Brandy Cruz, Fort Hood Public Affairs.)
Four-year-old Lilyanna Johnson, daughter of Sgt. Ryan Johnson, 1st Cavalry Division, enjoys hula hooping in front of the Spirit of Fort Hood Chapel during its Togetherness Day event, which was held in conjunction with the Fall Festival and Cowboys 4 Heroes Oct. 16. (U.S. Army photo by Brandy Cruz, Fort Hood Public Affairs.)

FORT HOOD, Texas — Fort Hood hosted its Fall Fest 11 a.m. – 2 p.m. Oct. 16 near the Phantom Warrior Center.

The fest was open to all military identification holders. Events included a pumpkin patch, arts & crafts, and DJ music.

“The service that these folks are providing out of the goodness of their heart is just amazing,” Maj. Gen. Steven Gilland, deputy commander for maneuver, said about Cowboys 4 Heroes.

The Cowboys 4 Heroes Foundation provided 15,000 FREE MEALS (hamburgers, hot dogs, and sausage-on-a-stick — individually wrapped) to the Fort Hood community as thank you for their service to our nation.

The C4H Foundation’s mission: “Cowboys 4 Heroes assists combat veterans during the challenging transition from active duty to civilian life. The volunteers that comprise the Cowboys 4 Heroes help veterans with combat related wounds of war as they and their families find and adjust to their new normal. Since 2010, Cowboys 4 Heroes donors and volunteers have provided more than 750,000 meals to transitioning veterans and their families while providing more than $275,000 in educational support to FFA and 4H Youth that raise the steer which are locally processed and provided to the program partners to assist veterans and their families.

 

Sgt. 1st Class Austin Dunlap holds trophy with 1st Cav. Div. Command Sgt. Maj. Shade Munday, Command Sgt. Maj. Cass Long, Lt. Col. Nicholas Ryan and division retention Sgt. Maj. Pablo Jaramillo.
(Photos by U.S Army Pfc. Cheyne Hanoski, 1st Cavalry Division)

By. Capt. Taylor Criswell, 1st Air Cavalry Brigade Public Affairs

 

FORT HOOD, Texas – 1st Air Cavalry Brigade (1ACB) Soldier takes top prize at 1st Cav. Div. Career Counselor of the Year Competition, Oct. 12-13.

 

Sgt. 1st Class Austin Dunlap, 615th Aviation Support Battalion (ASB), 1ACB, was named 1st Cav. Div. Career Counselor of the Year on Wed. after a rigorous two-day competition among the division’s top-performing career counselors. The event incorporated a written test, body composition evaluation, and competition board appearance. 615th ASB was also recognized as the top retention battalion in the division, having achieved 130% of FY21 combined mission completion.

When asked how retention fits into the Army’s People First Initiative, Dunlap said, “Knowing and caring for the Soldier, recognizing that it is not just a number but a person with a family, is what makes retention successful.”

One of the most challenging decisions a Soldier will face aside from joining the Army in the first place is whether or not to continue serving. Career counselors help Soldiers make that decision; they provide Soldiers with credible re-enlistment options, schooling opportunities, reclassification openings, and available bonuses. Assisting Soldiers with career choices is quintessential “People First.”

“People first is just that; taking care of people,” said Master Sgt. Wallata Madison, senior career counselor for 1ACB. “Every soldier and situation is unique. As career counselors, we have the privilege of working one-on-one with Soldiers to meet their individual needs, wants, desires and tries to align them with the needs of the Army.”

The brigade retention team’s efforts resulted in 1ACB receiving the “Top Small Brigade Retention Award” for having the highest overall percentage and closing out all assigned mission categories with combined overall completion of 108%. The team also received the “Early Bird Award,” given to the first brigade in the division to close out every assigned mission category.

Army regulation 601-280, the Army Retention Program, states that retention incentive awards help enhance commanders’ abilities to accomplish the Army’s retention goals. Retention NCOs are mission enablers; they help ensure the Army retains the highest-quality people and help shape the Army talent management enterprise. Army readiness starts with the talent alignment of our people, giving us the enduring advantage as the world’s most lethal fighting force.

“Many of the Soldiers in Aviation enlist in the Army on a 5 or 6-year contract and won’t enter their reenlistment window until they have already been in the Army for a few years,” said Madison. “The People First Initiative reinforces leaders from the squad or team to get to know their Soldiers on a personal level and create an inclusive environment where everyone feels valued, respected and appreciated.”

Originally from Hernando, Fl., Dunlap has been a career counselor for six years, initially enlisting as a 92F Petroleum Supply Specialist. Dunlap will represent the 1st Cav. Div. at the III Corps competition in November.

For more information about the 1st Air Cavalry Brigade, please contact Capt. Taylor Criswell, brigade public affairs officer, at donald.t.criswell.mil@army.mil.

 

Sgt. 1st Class Dunlap poses with Command Sgt. Maj. Munday after being named Division Career Counselor of the Year.

 

Command Sgt. Maj. Munday congratulates Sgt. 1st Class Dunlap for his excellent performance as an Army retention NCO.
The coveted “100 Club” trophies. These are presented to career counselors who process 100 Soldiers or more.

 

III Corps and Fort Hood officials opened the Liberty Village Splash Pad and Playground during a ribbon-cutting ceremony near Liberty Village community center at Fort Hood, Texas, Oct. 14, 2021. The project is part of a $1.1 billion renovation effort to increase the quality of life for Soldiers and their families that will target six posts throughout the Army. (U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Daniel Herman)
III Corps and Fort Hood officials opened the Liberty Village Splash Pad and Playground during a ribbon-cutting ceremony near Liberty Village community center at Fort Hood, Texas, Oct. 14, 2021. The project is part of a $1.1 billion renovation effort to increase the quality of life for Soldiers and their families that will target six posts throughout the Army. (U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Daniel Herman)
Col. Chad Foster, Fort Hood Fort Hood Garrison Commander, gives a speech at the III Corps and Fort Hood opened the Liberty Village Splash Pad and Playground during a ribbon-cutting ceremony near Liberty Village community center at Fort Hood, Texas, Oct. 14, 2021. The project is part of a $1.1 billion renovation effort to increase the quality of life for Soldiers and their families that will target six posts throughout the Army. (U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Daniel Herman)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FORT HOOD, Texas – Fort Hood officials opened the Liberty Village Splash Pad and Playground during a ribbon-cutting ceremony here Oct. 14 near the Liberty Village community center.

The project is part of a $1.1 billion renovation effort to increase the quality of life for Soldiers and their families that will target six posts throughout the Army.

“This is a great opportunity to come out and support the community,” said Col. Chad Foster, Fort Hood’s Garrison Commander, “especially with 11th Signal Brigade being the organization that supports and interacts with the community on a daily basis.”

For more hi-resolution photos, please go to DVIDS – News – Fort Hood and Liberty Village Splash Pad Ceremony (dvidshub.net)

For b-roll package, please go to DVIDS – Video – Fort Hood and Liberty Village Splash Pad Ceremony (dvidshub.net)

Spc. Caleb Green of 2nd Battalion, 13th Field Artillery Regiment, 1st Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division, prepares for his nightly call-for-fire mission with the Long Range Advanced Scout Surveillance System (LRAS) mounted on top of one of his Fire Support Vehicle (Stryker). (Photo by Mr. Gregory Dalglish, Test Officer, Intelligence Electronic Warfare Test Directorate)

 

Staff Sgt. Nicholas Cunningham from the Fort Huachuca, Arizona-based Intelligence Electronic Warfare Test Directorate, U.S. Army Operational Test Command, prepares for his nightly mission as a data collector. (Photo by Mr. Gregory Dalglish, Test Officer, Intelligence Electronic Warfare Test Directorate)

By Maj. Matthew Truax, Test Officer, Intelligence Electronic Warfare Test Directorate, U.S. Army Operational Test Command

WHITE SANDS MISSILE RANGE, New Mexico – 4th Infantry Division Soldiers tested the Army’s next-generation Assured Positioning Navigation and Timing (APNT) solution here, which allows Soldiers to maintain integrity of position and timing in GPS-contested environments.

The Mounted Assured Position Navigation and Timing (MAPS) will integrate across the Army’s wheeled and tracked platforms, bringing heightened protection levels against evolving GPS threats to support multi-domain operations.

During the first week of testing, 1st Stryker Brigade Combat Team (1SBCT) Soldiers received New Equipment Training (NET) to familiarize them with the MAPS system capabilities and user interface.

Throughout the rest of the test, they provided feedback on the system during operationally realistic missions, including Call for Fire (CFF), Reconnaissance, Quick Reaction Force (QRF) and Medical Evacuation (MEDVAC) in a GPS degraded environment.

“I’ve never seen what happens to GPS Systems when they encounter an Electronic Warfare (EW) attack,” said Capt. Christopher Mazeau, Assistant Operations Officer for 1SBCT.

He said he is glad to see the Army is working to develop an answer to such threats.

MAPS is designed to support command and control by replacing the need for multiple GPS devices on a single platform, and it also helps to mitigate EW attacks with an onboard anti-EW antenna.

The system aligns with the Army Futures Command (AFC)-directed requirement to prepare for tomorrow by providing overmatch in multi-domain operational environments.

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About the Intelligence Electronic Warfare Test Directorate:

IEWTD executes independent operational testing of intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR); EW; biometrics (BM); and intelligence analysis systems to inform acquisition and fielding decisions for Army and select multiservice warfighting systems. Additionally, IEWTD provides threat and ISR simulation and instrumentation support for internal and external test events.

About the U.S. Army Operational Test Command:

As the Army’s only independent operational tester, enlists the “Total Army” (Active, National Guard, and Reserve) when testing Army, joint, and multi-service warfighting systems in realistic operational environments, using typical Soldiers to determine whether the systems are effective, suitable, and survivable. OTC is required by public law to test major systems before they are fielded to its ultimate customer — the American Soldier.

FORT HOOD, Texas — Fort Hood officials will hold a Liberty Village Splash Pad and Playground ribbon cutting ceremony at 2 p.m. Oct. 14 near Liberty Village community center.

The upgrade is part of an ongoing Housing Improvement Plan to increase the quality of life for Soldiers and their families here.

Media interested in covering the event, should call Chris Haug, Fort Hood Public Affairs, at (254) 449-4023 or email christopher.j.haug.civ@army.mil.

Army Basic Training photo of Spc. Maxwell Hockin

FORT HOOD, Texas — Fort Hood officials do not suspect foul play in the death of Spc. Maxwell Hockin, who was found unresponsive Oct. 9 outside his company barracks.

An investigation by the U.S. Army Criminal Investigation Division is ongoing to determine the circumstances surrounding his death.

Spc. Maxwell Hockin, 26, who was assigned to 1st Armored Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division, entered the Army in March 2017 as a combat engineer. Hockin had been assigned to the 91st Engineer Battalion, here, since July 2017.

“The entire Saber family is devastated by the loss of our true teammate and friend Specialist Maxwell Hockin,” said Lt. Col. Patrick Sullivan, commander, 91st Engineer Battalion. “He had an outstanding work ethic and was always willing to help out the team. He will truly be missed. Our thoughts and our prayers are with Maxwell’s family during this difficult time.”

No further information will be released at this time while the investigation is underway.

FORT HOOD, TX- A Soldier assigned to the 1st Cavalry Division was found unresponsive behind his company barracks Oct. 9 here.

More details will be released once all next of kin have been notified. The incident is under investigation.

FORT HOOD, Texas — Officials from Fort Hood released the following information Oct. 12 regarding the ongoing efforts to facilitate Pfc. Jennifer Sewell’s safe return to Texas.

Sewell is a Fort Hood soldier who failed to report for duty on Oct. 7 and was later confirmed safe with extended family on Oct. 10.

Sewell’s chain of command worked closely with her and her family to help facilitate her safe return to Fort Hood yesterday afternoon, Oct. 11.

Sewell’s leadership and chain of command will continue to provide her access to resources and other tools necessary to thrive as a soldier and continue honorably serving.

The 3d Cavalry Regiment and Fort Hood deeply appreciates the public’s support and quick action to help proliferate initial and follow-up reports regarding this situation.

Fort Hood officials are respecting the family’s privacy and will not provide any further information regarding Pfc. Sewell.

 

 

FORT HOOD, Texas — Officials from Fort Hood released the following information Oct. 10 regarding the ongoing efforts to locate Pfc. Jennifer Sewell. Sewell is a Fort Hood soldier who failed to report for duty on Oct. 7.

Leadership from Sewell’s chain of command spoke to Sewell’s family earlier this evening, Oct. 10 at approximately 7 p.m.

Sewell’s family confirmed she is safe and with extended family.

Fort Hood officials continue to communicate with Sewell’s family and friends, to ensure she has access to resources she may need and to return her safely to Fort Hood.

“Pfc. Sewell is a valued member of our team, and our number one priority is ensuring her safe return. We are in regular contact with her family and will provide any assistance she and her family may need to return to Fort Hood,” said Ltc. Octavia Davis, commander of Regimental Support Squadron, 3d Cavalry Regiment.

Fort Hood officials are respecting the family’s privacy and will not provide any additional information until the appropriate time.

Fort Hood officials seek help in locating Pfc. Jennifer Sewell. Sewell was last seen leaving her on-post barracks at approximately 4 p.m. on Oct. 7.

FORT HOOD, Texas –The Fort Hood Directorate of Emergency Services, commonly known as DES, is seeking the public’s help in locating Fort Hood soldier, Pfc. Jennifer Sewell.

On Oct. 7, Sewell’s unit reported that she failed to report to work. Attempts to contact Sewell by law enforcement, her chain-of-command and her Family have been unsuccessful.

Sewell is an African American female, 5 feet 5 inches tall, with brown hair and brown eyes.

She does not own a vehicle.

Initial investigation appears that Sewell left for unknown reasons on her own accord.

Sewell was last seen leaving her on-post barracks at approximately 4 p.m. on Oct. 7.

Military officials are in constant contact with Sewell’s unit, her Family and close friends to ensure her health and safety.

Anyone with information related to the location of Sewell or details related to the conditions she went missing should contact the Fort Hood Military Police at (254) 288-1170.

Law enforcement officials will protect the privacy of those who wish to remain anonymous to the degree allowable under law and hold information to the strictest confidence.

If you observe any suspicious activity in your area please contact the Fort Hood Military Police desk at (254) 288-1131.

Gen. Michael X. Garrett, U.S. Army Forces Command commanding general, recognizes Pfc. Jennifer Sewell, of Regimental Support Squadron, 3d Cavalry Regiment, for her outstanding contributions to the Muleskinner Squadron, Jul. 16 at Fort Hood, Texas.