Fort Hood News Archive

FORT HOOD, Texas– Fort Hood officials have released the name of a Soldier who died on Tuesday, Nov. 9.

Staff Sgt. Dean Haniff, a Trooper assigned to Headquarters & Headquarters Battery, 2nd Battalion, 82nd Field Artillery Regiment, 3rd Armored Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division, was pronounced deceased at Seton Medical Center in Fort Hood, Texas. The circumstances surrounding his death are currently under investigation.

Staff Sgt. Haniff, 32, whose home of record is listed as Orlando, Florida, entered the Army in April 2010, as a Field Artillery Specialist and has been assigned at Fort Hood since December 2018.

“Staff Sgt. Dean Haniff was a valuable member of our Steel Dragons team.  We are deeply saddened by the loss of an incredible leader.” said Lt. Col. Christopher Carpenter, commander of 2nd Battalion, 82nd Field Artillery Regiment.  “We extend our deepest sympathies to his Family and friends. Our thoughts and prayers are with them in this time of mourning and reflection.”

Staff Sgt. Haniff’s awards and decorations include three Army Commendation Medals, two Army Achievement Medals, three Army Good Conduct Medals, the National Defense Service Medal Ribbon, two Afghanistan Campaign Medals, the Global War on Terrorism Medal, the Korea Defense Service Medal, the Army Service Ribbon, the Army Overseas Service Ribbon, the NATO Medal, and a Certificate of Achievement.

The unit leadership will continue to provide support and assistance to his Family during this difficult time.

Col. Reggie Harper and Command Sgt. Maj. Tyrone Murphy case the brigade colors on Nov. 10 to signify deployment to Europe for Atlantic Resolve. (U.S. Army photo by Pfc. Cheyne Hanoski)

Story by. Capt. Taylor Criswell, 1st Air Cavalry Brigade Public Affairs

The 1st Air Cavalry Brigade (1ACB), 1st Cavalry Division, held a colors casing ceremony at Cooper Field on Nov. 10, commemorating the official start of a rotation to Europe in support of Atlantic Resolve.

1st Cavalry Division pageantry was on full display at Fort Hood’s Cooper Field as Soldiers and family members gathered to mark the occasion. The 1st Cav. Div. Band and Horse Cavalry Detachment rounded out the event in true “First Team” fashion.

During the ceremony, 1ACB battalions cased their colors alongside the brigade, representing that they too were part of the deployment. The 1-227th Aviation Regiment displayed cased colors from the beginning of the ceremony as 1-227 is currently deployed to U.S. Central Command in support of Combined Joint Task Force – Operation Inherent Resolve.

Col. Reggie Harper, commander of 1ACB, exuded boldness and confidence in his organization while giving remarks during the ceremony. This deployment “will make us better as individuals and as a unit,” he said. “We will safeguard the reputation of our units and this country.”

Harper’s intent is to take full advantage of the abundant training opportunities during the rotation.

“When you take advantage of those opportunities, you get better. We should leave Europe in a higher state of readiness than we are right now,” he said. “Right now we are good, but when we get over there, we get better.”

Atlantic Resolve increases interoperability – the ability of U.S. forces and systems to operate in concert with those of other countries; a critical component of bolstering an extended network of alliances and partnerships capable of meeting the challenges in today’s global security environment.

“Because of where we’re at and working with partners almost every time we train, we’re going to develop relationships with NATO partners, NATO allies, partner nations and U.S. forces that we don’t typically work with.”

Harper stated that training hard with partners and allies allows the entire team to get better together and builds confidence in our combined capabilities. “When we do those things, we send a clear message to any potential adversary. We make them think twice,” he said. “Air Cav is on watch.”

Training conditions in Europe during the winter and early spring will test the personnel and equipment in ways that cannot be replicated at Fort Hood. High altitudes and sustained frigid temperatures will be just a few of the unique challenges.

“There is no survive. It is thrive,” said Harper. “That takes consistent leadership and focus. And it’s not easy. We’re going to take the hard right, and that requires people to be switched on as leaders.”

This is the second time 1ACB will fully deploy the brigade to Europe and the seventh rotation of an aviation brigade for Atlantic Resolve. 1ACB will operate primarily out of Germany, but will have a presence in other Atlantic Resolve participating countries, such as Greece and Romania. The brigade will align under the mission command of 1st Infantry Division (1ID) Forward. The 1st Cavalry Division Forward preceded 1ID as the mission command element for Atlantic Resolve, transferring authority in July 2021.

Atlantic Resolve is funded by the European Deterrence Initiative, which enables the U.S. to enhance deterrence, increase readiness and support NATO.

For media queries about Atlantic Resolve, email atlanticresolve@army.mil.

For more information about the 1st Air Cavalry Brigade, please contact Capt. Taylor Criswell, Brigade Public Affairs Officer, at donald.t.criswell.mil@army.mil.

 

Col. Harper and Command Sgt. Maj. Murphy bow their heads during the invocation at Cooper Field on Nov. 10. (U.S. Army photo by Pfc. Cheyne Hanoski)
Honor guard and command bugler exit the field with U.S. colors and cased brigade colors at the completion of the Nov. 10 ceremony. (U.S. Army photo by Pfc. Cheyne Hanoski)

 

Affairs Officer, at donald.t.criswell.mil@army.mil.

Story by U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Carolyn Hart, 3rd Armored Brigade Combat Team

With the 1st Cavalry patch proudly displayed on their uniforms, the men on the West Point Army Football team stood at the entrance of the stadium ready to face their opponents. Like the Gladiators of the Roman Empire and the many men and women who have worn the patch before them in battle, the players were eager to take on the Air Force football team.

“Wearing the 1st Cav patch…First Team…one team,” said Command Sgt. Maj. Ken Killingsworth, corps cadets command sergeant major. “Really talks to the culture of cohesive teams at the United States Military Academy, the corps of cadets and the Army football team.”

Soldiers from 6th Squadron, 9th Cavalry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division volunteered their time during the Army vs. Air Force Football game at Arlington, TX on Nov. 6.

“We’re able to interact with the civilian population and show them the equipment that we use,” said Sgt. Hayden Tice, cavalry scout with 6-9 Cav. “It’s a big deal for 1st Cav to be here and represent that patch and it’s a big deal to see our patch on those football player’s helmets. Makes you proud to be in 1st Cav.”

Soldiers from 3rd Brigade Combat Team set up a static display and were also on hand to wave the flag before the start of the game, honoring the brave men and women who served before them, ahead of this year’s Veteran’s Day.

Unit pride is something that echoes throughout the formations within the division and no one more than the 1st Cavalry division commander embodies pride in the patch.

Maj. Gen. John B. Richardson, a West Point alumni, was in the stadium, and along with the division command sergeant major, Shade Munday, led the football team onto the field of friendly strife.

“I’m extremely proud as the commander of the 1st Cavalry division that our patch is being worn by the army team,” said Richardson. “And as an alumni of West Point I’m always fired up to watch the Army team take on an opponent, especially the Air Force which is one of our greatest rivals in the sport.”

The Army team wears a different division’s patch on their uniform each week, but it was a special tribute to the “First Team” who is celebrating a momentous occasion.

“This week this team is wearing the 1st Cav patch on their helmets and we are very proud of that because it is the 1st Cav centennial,” said Richardson. “Just like I told the team, we are the Cav, courageous, audacious and victorious. Just like the Army football team.”

Soldiers from 6th Squadron, 9th Cavalry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division volunteered their time to set up a static display during the Army vs. Air Force Football game at Arlington, TX on Nov. 6. (U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Carolyn Hart)
1st Cavalry Division command team, Maj. Gen. John B. Richardson and Command Sgt. Maj. Shade Munday attend the West Point Army Football game in Arlington, Texas 6 Nov.
Richardson, a West Point alumni, along with Munday, led the football team onto the field of friendly strife against the Air Force. (U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Carolyn Hart)
The 1st Cavalry Division patch is worn by the West Point Football team during the game versus the Air Force.
The Army team wears a different division’s patch on their uniform each week, but it was a special tribute to the “First Team” who is celebrating their centennial. (U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Carolyn Hart)

 

FORT HOOD, Texas – Over 60 medical professionals from the 9th Hospital Center, 1st Medical Brigade, 13th Expeditionary Sustainment Command redeployed to Fort Hood today following a 9 month deployment to Iraq, where they served as Task Force Med at the Baghdad Diplomatic Support Center, in support of Operation Inherent Resolve.   In addition to commanding TF Med 9, they were the lead for the OIR COVID-19 response, the OIR health service support and force health protection, and the Combined Joint Task Force-OIR surgeon.

“During our deployment to over 9 bases in 4 countries, TF MED 9 developed lasting coalition relationships in our advise, assist and enable OIR mission with more than 20 coalition partners, assisting Iraqi Security Forces in medical training and logistics,” stated Col. David L.  Hamilton, the 9th HC commander.

“These Soldiers can be proud of their accomplishments of coordinating, synchronizing, integrating, and executing health service support and force health protection during combat operation and during a pandemic,” remarked Col Roger S. Giraud, commander of the 1st Medical Brigade.

The 1st Medical Brigade supports global missions worldwide, as well as COVID-19 and Afghanistan Allies health support here in the U.S.

Col Roger S. Giraud (center), commander of the 1st Medical Brigade, greeted Col. Dave Hamilton (left), the 9th Hospital Center commander, following the 9th Hospital Center, 1st Medical Brigade’s redeployment to Fort Hood following a 9 month deployment to Iraq, where they served as Task Force Med at the Baghdad Diplomatic Support Center, in support of Operation Inherent Resolve, on Nov. 8, 2021.  (U.S. Army photo by Capt. Tyson Friar)

 

Col Roger S. Giraud, commander of the 1st Medical Brigade, greeted Soldiers from the 9th Hospital Center, 1st Medical Brigade redeployed to Fort Hood following a 9 month deployment to Iraq, where they served as Task Force Med at the Baghdad Diplomatic Support Center, in support of Operation Inherent Resolve, on Nov. 8, 2021.  (U.S. Army photo by Capt. Tyson Friar) 

 

Joyous reunion
Col. Dave Hamilton (center), the 9th Hospital Center commander, embraces Sgt. First Class Javidi Thomas (left) during a cheerful reunion while Soldiers from the 9th Hospital Center, 1st Medical Brigade redeployed to Fort Hood following a 9 month deployment to Iraq, where they served as Task Force Med at the Baghdad Diplomatic Support Center, in support of Operation Inherent Resolve, on Nov. 8, 2021.  (U.S. Army photo by Capt. Tyson Friar) 

 

Col. Dave Hamilton (left), the 9th Hospital Center commander, observed a joyous reunion as Soldiers from the 9th HC, 1st Medical Brigade redeployed to Fort Hood following a 9 month deployment to Iraq, where they served as Task Force Med at the Baghdad Diplomatic Support Center, in support of Operation Inherent Resolve, on Nov. 8, 2021.  (U.S. Army photo by Capt. Tyson Friar)

 

Soldiers from the 9th Hospital Center, 1st Medical Brigade redeployed to Fort Hood following a 9 month deployment to Iraq, where they served as Task Force Med at the Baghdad Diplomatic Support Center, in support of Operation Inherent Resolve, on Nov. 8, 2021.  (U.S. Army photo by Capt. Tyson Friar)

 

 

Story by U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Carolyn Hart, 3rd Armored Brigade Combat Team

FORT HOOD, Texas — Earlier this year, in support of the State Department, members of the U.S. military and numerous government agencies came together to support the evacuation of Afghan citizens seeking relocation as part of the biggest airlift operation in U.S history.

The coordinated effort to support the Afghan evacuees who came to the U.S. for resettlement, became known as Operation Allies Welcome. Among those who assisted the Department of Homeland Security-led effort of resettling and integrating Afghan evacuees into the U.S. was Task Force Ghost, led by 2nd Battalion, 7th U.S. Cavalry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division.

“This mission was a significant opportunity for our Troopers to support and repay vulnerable Afghans and Afghan who have worked with U.S. and allied nations for the past two decades,” said Lt. Col. Chris Cook, battalion commander with 2-7 Cav. “It was an opportunity to provide closure for our veterans and to help friends in desperate need.”

Having served in the Army since the start of the Afghanistan War, Cook said this mission is one he is particularly proud to have supported.

“On a personal level, this provided an opportunity to repay people with whom we have fought shoulder to shoulder with for the better part of my career,” explained Cook. “Helping their families in their greatest time of need provided closure for me and many of our Afghanistan veterans. On a professional level, watching our leaders take ownership of the mission and problems they encountered was amazing. I could not be more proud of the individual Ghost Trooper and our junior leaders. They are directly responsible for our team’s success.”

Army leaders and Soldiers train regularly to be ready for various types of missions but there are
instances, like this one, where a unique opportunity arises for them to challenge themselves and put their readiness to the test. Task Force Ghost, in support of DHS and other interagency partners, built a village capable of supporting 7,000 people in less than a week at Camp Atterbury, Indiana.

“Kinetic operations are more stressful at times, but supporting an entire city of 7,000 had its own unique challenges,” said Maj. Thomas Lorenson, executive officer for 2-7 Cav. “I am very happy that I served alongside leaders who were both inspiring and experienced.”

Leadership truly made a difference in the battalion’s ability to accomplish this mission, and that support was not limited to the leadership on ground.

“Without the support of the entire 3rd Brigade “GREYWOLF” team, none of this mission would have been possible,” said Lorenson. “The leadership at the brigade deployed our battalion on short notice and helped sustain operations, allowing 2-7 Cav to focus on the people and our mission.”

Recently, 2-7 Cav returned to Fort Hood and passed their important mission on to Soldiers of 2nd Battalion, 12th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Armored Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cav. Div.

“It is a great privilege to take part in an extremely important mission such as this,” Lt. Col. Damasio Davila, battalion commander with 2-12 Cav. “We have a unique opportunity to represent our nation, and display good will and hospitality. “The “Thunderhorse” team is honored to support Operation Allies Welcome.”

This mission has left a meaningful impact on the 2-7 Cav leadership that will last a lifetime.

“In the background of mass evacuations, the stress of moving between a series of impromptu camps, the stress of navigating the resettlement process, kids are playing,” recalls Cook. “Kids are the same everywhere, eager to learn, eager to play, immune from many of their surroundings. I am glad they will have incredible opportunities here.”

Soldiers assigned to the 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division deployed from Fort Hood, Texas in support of Department of State-led OPERATION ALLIES WELCOME. (U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Carolyn Hart)
Soldiers assigned to the 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division deployed from Fort Hood, Texas in support of Department of State-led OPERATION ALLIES WELCOME. (U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Carolyn Hart)
Soldiers assigned to the 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division return to Fort Hood, Texas after supporting the Department of State-led OPERATION ALLIES WELCOME. (U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Carolyn Hart)
Soldiers assigned to the 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division return to Fort Hood, Texas after supporting the Department of State-led OPERATION ALLIES WELCOME. (U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Carolyn Hart)

 

FORT HOOD, Texas — 1st Air Cavalry Brigade will case its colors to signify the start of its deployment to Europe in a ceremony at Cooper Field, Nov. 10 at 9 a.m.

The 1st Air Cavalry Brigade will deploy to Europe this fall in support of Atlantic Resolve. The rotational presence ensures interoperability and enables NATO Allies and partners to deploy forces globally alongside the U.S.

Since April 2014, U.S. Army Europe and Africa has led the Department of Defense’s Atlantic Resolve land efforts by bringing units based in the U.S. to Europe for nine months at a time. The deployment of ready, combat-credible U.S. forces to Europe in support of Atlantic Resolve is evidence of the strong and unremitting U.S. commitment to NATO and Europe. Through bilateral, joint and multinational training, Atlantic Resolve builds readiness, increases interoperability and enhances the bond between ally and partner militaries.

The ceremony will also include the change of responsibility from Command Sgt. Maj. Carlos Loeza to Command Sgt. Maj. Tyrone Murphy.

Media representatives interested in covering the event should contact 1st Air Cavalry Brigade Public Affairs at 210-527-7974 or email donald.t.criswell.mil@army.mil by 3 p.m. Nov. 9.

Media who RSVP should arrive at the Marvin Leath Visitors Center on Nov. 10 at 8:15 a.m. to be escorted to the event. The ceremony will begin at 9 a.m.

U.S. Army Master Sgt. Miriam Espinoza, 1st Cavalry Division Public Affairs

 

FORT HOOD, Texas – A 1st Cavalry Division career counselor was selected to represent the division and III Corps at the U.S. Army Forces Command level competition next month.

Sgt. 1st Class Austin Dunlap, career counselor, 615th Aviation Support Battalion, 1st Air Cavalry Brigade, was named III Corps’ Career Counselor of the Year on Nov. 4  after a rigorous three-day competition among the Corps’ top-performing career counselors.

Dunlap attributes his success to “Knowing and caring for the Trooper, recognizing that it is not just a number but a person with a family, is what makes retention successful.”

Every year the 1CD retention office receives a mission to help the Army meet its end strength, Which enables the Army to have the right amount of Soldiers to fight and win wars.

“He is a solid career counselor with a lot of experience, he over exceeds his mission every year, he is passionate about what he does and truly cares about taking care of Troopers and Families,” said Sgt. Maj. Pablo Jaramillo, command career counseling, 1CD.

Out of 30 battalions currently assigned to the division, Dunlap’s battalion placed number one in retention accomplishments for fiscal year 2021 and 2022. This year he accomplished over 130 percent of his mission.

“We are very proud of Sgt. 1st Class Dunlap and our entire retention team, year in and year out they work hard to keep the best Soldiers in our team,” said Sgt. Maj. Shade Munday, command sergeant major, 1st Cavalry Division. “This win is just a testament of their hard work and commitment to the Army’s mission to retain our best and brightest Troopers.”

Dunlap was awarded the Army’s Meritorious Service Medal, a coin for excellence from the III Corps commanding general, Lt. Gen. Robert White, a gift certificate and a trophy.

1st Cavalry Division was also presented with a trophy for being the top producing division in the Corps. This is the second year in a row the division receives this recognition.

“Winning matters in the 1st Cavalry Division and our Non-commissioned officers always lead from the front,” added Munday.

Originally from Hernando, Fl., Dunlap has been a career counselor for six years, initially enlisting as a Petroleum Supply Specialist.

For any questions please contact MSG Miriam Espinoza at miriam.espinozatorres.mil@army.mil or 254-247-4075.

Sgt. Maj. Shade Munday, command sergeant major, 1st Cavalry Division, congratulates Sgt. 1st Class Austin Dunlap, career counselor, 615th Aviation Support Battalion, 1st Air Cavalry Brigade for being named III Corps’ Career Counselor of the Year on Nov. 4. Dunlap will represent the division and III Corps at the U.S. Army Forces Command level competition next month. (Photo by U.S. Army Pfc. Cheyne Hanoski, 1st Cavalry Division Public Affairs Office)
Sgt. 1st Class Austin Dunlap, career counselor, 615th Aviation Support Battalion, 1st Air Cavalry Brigade, was named III Corps’ Career Counselor of the Year on Nov. 4 . Dunlap will represent the division and III Corps at the U.S. Army Forces Command level competition next month. (Photo by U.S. Army Pfc. Cheyne Hanoski, 1st Cavalry Division Public Affairs Office)
Lt. Gen. Robert “Pat” White, commanding general, III Corps and Sgt. Maj. Arthur “Cliff” Burgoyne Jr., command sergeant major, III Corps present Sgt. 1st Class Austin Dunlap with the Army’s Meritorious Service Medal for winning this year’s Career Counselor of the Year Nov. 4 at Fort Hood Texas. Dunlap, a native of Hernando, Fl., will represent the 1st Cavalry Division and III Corps at the U.S. Army Forces Command level competition next month. (Photo by U.S. Army Pfc. Cheyne Hanoski, 1st Cavalry Division Public Affairs Office)

By Mr. Joshua Smith, Test Officer, Maneuver Support and Sustainment Test Directorate, U.S. Army Operational Test Command

FORT HOOD, Texas — Soldiers from Fort Bragg, North Carolina, Joint Base Lewis-McCord, Washington, Marines from Camp Lejeune, North Carolina, and Airmen from Joint Base-Charleston, South Carolina teamed here to test new chemical agent detection systems.

Warfighters from across the nation conducted operational testing of the new systems between October and November. Through these Warfighters’ efforts, data was collected for decision-makers and valuable hands-on training was performed.

Soldiers with the 21st Hazard Response Company and 11th Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear (CBRN) Company along with Marines from the 2nd Marine Logistics Group and Airmen from the 628th Civil Engineer Squadron went hands-on with the Aerosol and Vapor Chemical Agent Detector (AVCAD) and the Multi-phase Chemical Agent Detector (MPCAD).

“As a Hazard Assessment Platoon, seldom are we presented the opportunity to focus on in-depth surveillance, characterization, and exploitation of realistic CBRN threats,” said 1st Lt. Matt Lohff, Platoon Leader of 3rd Platoon, 21st CBRN Hazard Response Company, 83rd CBRN Battalion.

“These two operational tests have given my platoon the opportunity to focus on our critical wartime collective tasks of dismounted CBRN reconnaissance and surveillance,” Lohff continued.

“The amount of hands-on training and employment opportunities we received really gave all of us confidence in the equipment and our capabilities with respect to our operational readiness.”

According to Mr. Joe Scheerer, test officer with the U.S. Army Operational Test Command’s Maneuver Support and Sustainment Test Directorate, test data and feedback collected informs senior Joint Service leaders on the effectiveness, suitability, and reliability of the AVCAD and MPCAD systems.

Scheerer explained during the 10-day record test, the Soldiers, Airmen, and Marines deployed the systems, analyzed chemical threat samples, provided detailed warning and reports, and conducted decontamination using the systems over 18 varying threat targets.

“CBRN site assessment and surveillance operations are complex missions that require our Joint Service CBRN assets to remain equipped with systems that are effective and suitable in Warfighter’s hands,” Scheerer said. “This test event is about making sure the systems developed provide proper capabilities in the environments in which Warfighters and units train and fight.”

~~

About the U.S. Army Operational Test Command:

As the Army’s only independent operational tester, USAOTC enlists the “Total Army” (Active, National Guard, and Reserve) when testing Army, joint, and multi-service warfighting systems in realistic operational environments, using typical Soldiers to determine whether the systems are effective, suitable, and survivable. USAOTC is required by public law to test major systems before they are fielded to its ultimate customer — the American Soldier.

The Maneuver Support and Sustainment Test Directorate conducts operational tests of combat engineer, chemical, transportation, military police, quartermaster, ordnance and medical service systems in order to provide our senior leaders with the necessary information to field the highest quality equipment for the warfighter.

Story by U.S. Army Master Sgt. Miriam Espinoza, 1st Cavalry Division Public Affairs

The 1st Cavalry Division inaugurated Pegasus Troop, a reception company, in an effort to integrate and welcome Troopers and their Families into the “First Team.” On Nov. 3, the reception company held its first patch ceremony to welcome approximately 66 Troopers into the division.

“You spent your first week in Pegasus Troop because we put our people first; troopers and families,” said Maj. Gen. John Richardson, commanding general, 1CD. “We want to earn your trust by bringing you into the team the right way while also teaching you all the standards.”

An average of 500 Troopers arrive into the division every month, some are coming from Advanced Individual Training, and this is their first duty station, and for some this is their third of fourth duty station. Regardless of where they and their Families are coming from the 1st Cavalry Division’s new initiative aims at ensuring every soldier is properly integrated into the unit.

“Our program is designed to make the Troopers and their Families feel welcomed, and to take care of any problems that might have not gotten taken care of before,” said Sgt. Maj. Kenneth Dyer, operations sergeant major, 1st Cavalry Division.

The reception company will serve as a way to minimize issues that Troopers and their Families often have during a permanent change of station. Problems like finance, housing or childcare.

“The Trooper isn’t the only person that will be part of the team, their Family will also be part of the First Team,” said Sgt. 1st Class Brian Brown, non-commissioned officer in charge, Pegasus Troop. “We want to make sure the Troopers and their Family are well settled in before they arrive to their units.”

The Troopers will go through an 8-day integration program, during those eight days, the Soldiers will complete any administrative actions they need, participate in the Army Combat Fitness Test, a Leaders Reaction Course, and SHARP and EO Training among other online training and events to ensure everything is done before reporting to their units.

“I’m glad to be here, I am glad to be a part of the First Team, I am going to enjoy my time at the Great Place,” said Cpl. Douglas Sloan, light wheeled vehicle mechanic, 1st Air Cavalry Brigade. Sloan, who has relocated a couple of times, is glad to see a program that welcomed him and that has already made him feel like he’s “part of a Family”

The company will also introduce Troopers to services the division and Fort Hood offer and where these services are located. Essential services like Sexual Assault/Harassment Response and Prevention Program, Chaplain, and Equal Opportunity among other programs that benefit the Troopers and their Families.

“It’s been a great experience, my first week I was getting acclimated and Pegasus Troop really helped us do that, and help us figure out where things are,” said Pvt. Dallas Aistrup, infantryman, 1st Battalion, 5th Cavalry Regiment, 2nd Armored Brigade Combat Team. “This being my first duty station that was really amazing for me.”

A major effort of Pegasus Troop is teaching incoming Soldiers about the Division’s 100-years of legacy, the history and the many legends who came before them. According to Brown “It’s about building pride in the unit.”

“This big yellow patch [1st Cavalry Division patch] does something to an individual that makes him or her a better Soldier, a better team member, and a better American that he or she otherwise would have been,” said Richardson in his closing comments during the patch ceremony.

“First impressions really tell a lot, and showing up to my first duty station and having the commanding general, the command sergeant major and your unit come welcome you, it’s really great, I couldn’t ask for a better unit, I am very proud to be part of the 1st Cavalry Division,” added Aistrup, a native of Amarillo, Texas.

Maj. Gen. John Richardson, commanding general, 1st Cavalry Division, welcomes Troopers to the division during a patch ceremony Nov. 3 at the Mission Training Complex on Fort Hood, Texas. The Division recently inaugurated Pegasus Troop, a reception company, in an effort to integrate and welcome Troopers and their Families into the “First Team.” Nov. 3’s ceremony was the first of its kind where approximately 66 Troopers received a 1CD Patch formally joining America’s First Team. (Photos by U.S. Army Pfc. Cheyne Hanoski, 1st Cavalry Division Public Affairs Office)
A Trooper receives the 1st Cavalry Division patch during a patch ceremony Nov. 3 at the Mission Training Complex on Fort Hood, Texas. The Division recently inaugurated Pegasus Troop, a reception company, in an effort to integrate and welcome Troopers and their Families into the “First Team.” Nov. 3’s ceremony was the first of its kind where approximately 66 Troopers received a 1CD Patch formally joining America’s First Team. (Photos by U.S. Army Pfc. Cheyne Hanoski, 1st Cavalry Division Public Affairs Office)
1st Cavalry Division held a patch ceremony for approximately 66 Troopers arriving to the division Nov. 3 at the Mission Training Complex on Fort Hood, Texas. The Division recently inaugurated Pegasus Troop, a reception company, in an effort to integrate and welcome Troopers and their Families into the “First Team. (Photos by U.S. Army Pfc. Cheyne Hanoski, 1st Cavalry Division Public Affairs Office)
1st Cavalry Division held a patch ceremony for approximately 66 Troopers arriving to the division Nov. 3 at the Mission Training Complex on Fort Hood, Texas. The Division recently inaugurated Pegasus Troop, a reception company, in an effort to integrate and welcome Troopers and their Families into the “First Team. (Photos by U.S. Army Pfc. Cheyne Hanoski, 1st Cavalry Division Public Affairs Office)

The 1st Cavalry Division will hold an inaugural patch ceremony to formally welcome Troopers into “America’s First Team” Nov. 3 at 9 a.m. at Cooper Field on Fort Hood, Texas.

The division recently activated Pegasus Troop, a reception company, to ensure all Troopers arriving into the division have a chance to learn about the division, meet their chain of command, learn about the division’s resources, and take care of any personal issues arising from their permanent change of station before arriving to their assigned units and begin their regular work routine.

The incoming Troopers are assigned to the reception company for approximately eight days, on the last day they will go through a formal patch ceremony, where they will be given a 1st Cavalry Division patch, formally identifying them as part of the First Team.

The first patch ceremony as part of Pegasus Troop is this Wednesday, when approximately 66 Troopers will receive the largest patch in the Army.

Media desiring to cover this event must RSVP to Master Sgt. Miriam Espinoza at miriam.espinozatorres.mil@army.mil or 254-247-4075 no later than 7 p.m. on Nov. 2.

A public affairs representative will meet the media at the south parking lot of Marvin Leath Visitors Center located on T. J. Mills Blvd. at 8:30 a.m. for an escort to the event.

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