Fort Hood News Archive

Spc. Caleb Green of 2nd Battalion, 13th Field Artillery Regiment, 1st Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division, prepares for his nightly call-for-fire mission with the Long Range Advanced Scout Surveillance System (LRAS) mounted on top of one of his Fire Support Vehicle (Stryker). (Photo by Mr. Gregory Dalglish, Test Officer, Intelligence Electronic Warfare Test Directorate)

 

Staff Sgt. Nicholas Cunningham from the Fort Huachuca, Arizona-based Intelligence Electronic Warfare Test Directorate, U.S. Army Operational Test Command, prepares for his nightly mission as a data collector. (Photo by Mr. Gregory Dalglish, Test Officer, Intelligence Electronic Warfare Test Directorate)

By Maj. Matthew Truax, Test Officer, Intelligence Electronic Warfare Test Directorate, U.S. Army Operational Test Command

WHITE SANDS MISSILE RANGE, New Mexico – 4th Infantry Division Soldiers tested the Army’s next-generation Assured Positioning Navigation and Timing (APNT) solution here, which allows Soldiers to maintain integrity of position and timing in GPS-contested environments.

The Mounted Assured Position Navigation and Timing (MAPS) will integrate across the Army’s wheeled and tracked platforms, bringing heightened protection levels against evolving GPS threats to support multi-domain operations.

During the first week of testing, 1st Stryker Brigade Combat Team (1SBCT) Soldiers received New Equipment Training (NET) to familiarize them with the MAPS system capabilities and user interface.

Throughout the rest of the test, they provided feedback on the system during operationally realistic missions, including Call for Fire (CFF), Reconnaissance, Quick Reaction Force (QRF) and Medical Evacuation (MEDVAC) in a GPS degraded environment.

“I’ve never seen what happens to GPS Systems when they encounter an Electronic Warfare (EW) attack,” said Capt. Christopher Mazeau, Assistant Operations Officer for 1SBCT.

He said he is glad to see the Army is working to develop an answer to such threats.

MAPS is designed to support command and control by replacing the need for multiple GPS devices on a single platform, and it also helps to mitigate EW attacks with an onboard anti-EW antenna.

The system aligns with the Army Futures Command (AFC)-directed requirement to prepare for tomorrow by providing overmatch in multi-domain operational environments.

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About the Intelligence Electronic Warfare Test Directorate:

IEWTD executes independent operational testing of intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR); EW; biometrics (BM); and intelligence analysis systems to inform acquisition and fielding decisions for Army and select multiservice warfighting systems. Additionally, IEWTD provides threat and ISR simulation and instrumentation support for internal and external test events.

About the U.S. Army Operational Test Command:

As the Army’s only independent operational tester, enlists the “Total Army” (Active, National Guard, and Reserve) when testing Army, joint, and multi-service warfighting systems in realistic operational environments, using typical Soldiers to determine whether the systems are effective, suitable, and survivable. OTC is required by public law to test major systems before they are fielded to its ultimate customer — the American Soldier.

FORT HOOD, Texas — Fort Hood officials will hold a Liberty Village Splash Pad and Playground ribbon cutting ceremony at 2 p.m. Oct. 14 near Liberty Village community center.

The upgrade is part of an ongoing Housing Improvement Plan to increase the quality of life for Soldiers and their families here.

Media interested in covering the event, should call Chris Haug, Fort Hood Public Affairs, at (254) 449-4023 or email christopher.j.haug.civ@army.mil.

Army Basic Training photo of Spc. Maxwell Hockin

FORT HOOD, Texas — Fort Hood officials do not suspect foul play in the death of Spc. Maxwell Hockin, who was found unresponsive Oct. 9 outside his company barracks.

An investigation by the U.S. Army Criminal Investigation Division is ongoing to determine the circumstances surrounding his death.

Spc. Maxwell Hockin, 26, who was assigned to 1st Armored Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division, entered the Army in March 2017 as a combat engineer. Hockin had been assigned to the 91st Engineer Battalion, here, since July 2017.

“The entire Saber family is devastated by the loss of our true teammate and friend Specialist Maxwell Hockin,” said Lt. Col. Patrick Sullivan, commander, 91st Engineer Battalion. “He had an outstanding work ethic and was always willing to help out the team. He will truly be missed. Our thoughts and our prayers are with Maxwell’s family during this difficult time.”

No further information will be released at this time while the investigation is underway.

FORT HOOD, TX- A Soldier assigned to the 1st Cavalry Division was found unresponsive behind his company barracks Oct. 9 here.

More details will be released once all next of kin have been notified. The incident is under investigation.

FORT HOOD, Texas — Officials from Fort Hood released the following information Oct. 12 regarding the ongoing efforts to facilitate Pfc. Jennifer Sewell’s safe return to Texas.

Sewell is a Fort Hood soldier who failed to report for duty on Oct. 7 and was later confirmed safe with extended family on Oct. 10.

Sewell’s chain of command worked closely with her and her family to help facilitate her safe return to Fort Hood yesterday afternoon, Oct. 11.

Sewell’s leadership and chain of command will continue to provide her access to resources and other tools necessary to thrive as a soldier and continue honorably serving.

The 3d Cavalry Regiment and Fort Hood deeply appreciates the public’s support and quick action to help proliferate initial and follow-up reports regarding this situation.

Fort Hood officials are respecting the family’s privacy and will not provide any further information regarding Pfc. Sewell.

 

 

FORT HOOD, Texas — Officials from Fort Hood released the following information Oct. 10 regarding the ongoing efforts to locate Pfc. Jennifer Sewell. Sewell is a Fort Hood soldier who failed to report for duty on Oct. 7.

Leadership from Sewell’s chain of command spoke to Sewell’s family earlier this evening, Oct. 10 at approximately 7 p.m.

Sewell’s family confirmed she is safe and with extended family.

Fort Hood officials continue to communicate with Sewell’s family and friends, to ensure she has access to resources she may need and to return her safely to Fort Hood.

“Pfc. Sewell is a valued member of our team, and our number one priority is ensuring her safe return. We are in regular contact with her family and will provide any assistance she and her family may need to return to Fort Hood,” said Ltc. Octavia Davis, commander of Regimental Support Squadron, 3d Cavalry Regiment.

Fort Hood officials are respecting the family’s privacy and will not provide any additional information until the appropriate time.

Fort Hood officials seek help in locating Pfc. Jennifer Sewell. Sewell was last seen leaving her on-post barracks at approximately 4 p.m. on Oct. 7.

FORT HOOD, Texas –The Fort Hood Directorate of Emergency Services, commonly known as DES, is seeking the public’s help in locating Fort Hood soldier, Pfc. Jennifer Sewell.

On Oct. 7, Sewell’s unit reported that she failed to report to work. Attempts to contact Sewell by law enforcement, her chain-of-command and her Family have been unsuccessful.

Sewell is an African American female, 5 feet 5 inches tall, with brown hair and brown eyes.

She does not own a vehicle.

Initial investigation appears that Sewell left for unknown reasons on her own accord.

Sewell was last seen leaving her on-post barracks at approximately 4 p.m. on Oct. 7.

Military officials are in constant contact with Sewell’s unit, her Family and close friends to ensure her health and safety.

Anyone with information related to the location of Sewell or details related to the conditions she went missing should contact the Fort Hood Military Police at (254) 288-1170.

Law enforcement officials will protect the privacy of those who wish to remain anonymous to the degree allowable under law and hold information to the strictest confidence.

If you observe any suspicious activity in your area please contact the Fort Hood Military Police desk at (254) 288-1131.

Gen. Michael X. Garrett, U.S. Army Forces Command commanding general, recognizes Pfc. Jennifer Sewell, of Regimental Support Squadron, 3d Cavalry Regiment, for her outstanding contributions to the Muleskinner Squadron, Jul. 16 at Fort Hood, Texas.

 

Story by: Lt. Col. Jennifer J. Bocanegra

FORT HOOD, TX- This afternoon three soldiers from 2nd Battalion, 12th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Armored Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division received the Life Saving award from the Bell County Sheriff’s Department for their timely actions, which led to saving the life of a fellow service member attempting to commit suicide.

During the ceremony held at Howze Theater on post, leaders from 2-12 CAV and the Bell County Sheriff’s Department recounted the events from June 19th, highlighting the selfless actions of the three noncommissioned officers being honored.

In his remarks, the 2-12 CAV operations sergeant major, U.S. Army Sgt. Maj. Jerry A. Long described his definition of heroism comparing the actions of U.S. Army Sgt. 1st Class Nicholas Ketch, U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Stephen Gulczynski and U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Corey Clark as heroic saying, “The Army attempts to breed camaraderie and bravery, and these three answered the call for a fellow soldier in need. They saved their teammate, even while putting their own lives in peril…they had built so much trust within their team and the family members within their sphere of influence, that when things went wrong with one of their teammates, the family knew who to call.”

On the evening of June 19th, following a unit BBQ, deputies from Bell County, Texas received reports of a service member threatening to take his own life. As deputies arrived on scene, they were joined by members of the victim’s unit, Ketch, Gulczynski and Clark, all who immediately began working together to coach their teammate off of a ledge and back to safety.

“It is my opinion that the individuals involved in this incident demonstrated an unmatched amount of empathy and concern for their fellow soldier in crisis,” said Bell County Sheriff’s Department Sergeant Christopher M. Wilcox. “Their efforts and quick actions contributed to the successful outcome of the incident and help avert a tragic situation.

All three awardees are infantry noncommissioned officers with a range of leadership experiences at the squad and platoon-level. Both Clark and Ketch received formal military training on suicide intervention and building and maintaining resiliency.

“We are extremely proud of these three NCOs who took immediate steps to save the life of a teammate. As we focus on placing people first, mid-level leaders like Sergeant 1st Class Ketch, Staff Sgt. Gulczynski and Staff Sgt. Clark set the example of implementing a support system to care for soldiers within our formation,” said U.S. Army Lt. Col. Damasio Davila, battalion commander, 2-12 CAV.

Following the main award ceremony, 2-12 CAV leaders presented the three NCOs with Army Achievement Medals and Command Sgt. Maj. Hall, 1 ABCT brigade command sergeant major, issued coins recognizing the soldiers for their life-saving actions on June 19th.

The Life Saving Award is awarded by the Sheriff Department for saving a human life.

U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Stephen Gulczynski shakes hands with Bell County Sheriff’s Department Deputy Chief Jeff Buuck after receiving the Sheriff’s Department Life Saving award for his heroic actions on June 19, 2021, which saved the life of a fellow service member.  (U.S. Army photo by: Private 1st Class Cheyne Hanoski, 1st Cavalry Division Public Affairs)
County Sheriff’s Department Presents the Life Saving Award to 1st Cavalry Division Troopers
U.S. Army U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Corey A. Clark Jr. shakes hands with 2-12 CAV battalion and company leadership after receiving the Sheriff’s Department Life Saving award for his heroic actions on June 19, 2021, which saved the life of a fellow service member.   (U.S. Army photo by: Private 1st Class Cheyne Hanoski, 1st Cavalry Division Public Affairs)

U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Corey A. Clark Jr., U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Stephen Z. Gulczynski and U.S. Army Sgt. 1st Class Nicholas A. Ketch (left to right) stand on stage at Howze Theater after receiving the Life Saving award from Bell Country Sheriff’s Department for their heroic actions on June 19, 2021. (U.S. Army photo by: Private 1st Class Cheyne Hanoski, 1st Cavalry Division Public Affairs)

County Sheriff’s Department Presents the Life Saving Award to 1st Cavalry Division Troopers
U.S. Army Sgt. 1st Class Nicholas A. Ketch shakes hands with Bell County Sheriff’s Department Deputy Chief Jeff Buuck after receiving the Sheriff’s Department Life Saving award for his heroic actions on June 19, 2021, which saved the life of a fellow service member.  (U.S. Army photo by: Private 1st Class Cheyne Hanoski, 1st Cavalry Division Public Affairs)

 

By Maj. Gabby Thompson

3d Cavalry Regiment Public Affairs

(L-R) Command Sgt. Maj. David Schoettle, Staff Sgt. Jennifer Licata, Lt. Col. Octavia Davis and Col. Kevin Bradley at Fort Hood, Texas, Oct. 7. The Regimental Support Squadron received the trophy for achieving the highest retention mission in the regiment. (U.S. Army photo by Maj. Gabriela Thompson)

FORT HOOD, Texas – Col. Kevin D. Bradley, commander of the 3d Cavalry Regiment, presented the 3d Cavalry Regiment Retention Trophy to the Regimental Support Squadron for accomplishing the highest retention mission Oct. 7, here.

The regiment created the award to recognize the top squadron for meeting or surpassing their retention mission for the year.

Each squadron in the regiment has their own career counselor, and the one to lead the “Muleskinners” to securing their place at the top and the trophy was Staff. Sgt. Jennifer Licata, a native of Mira Loma, California, a confident, caring leader who takes her job seriously as an Army career counselor.

“My senior [career counselor] pulled me in and said our goal was 126, and I said ‘that’s going to happen, definitely at Muleskinner,’ and we exceeded that,” said Licata.

Meeting or surpassing a unit retention goal is no easy fete, yet the “Muleskinners” managed to not only meet their goal, but exceeded it at almost 128%, retaining 147 troopers and securing $164,800 in retention bonuses.

The 3d Cavalry Regiment commander also understands how difficult a task it is to retain troopers and soldiers in the Army.

“We want to recognize the very best of our career counselors and their retention success…it’s one of the toughest jobs in the Army,” he said.

Licata has a unique support system guiding her along her journey as an Army career counselor.

“This was my first squadron as a career counselor, and it was very challenging for me and I couldn’t have done it without my wife,” said Licata.

Licata’s wife is also a career counselor assigned to III Corps and is no stranger to surpassing retention goals. She was named the 2020 Army Career Counselor of the year, beating 19 other competing counselors from across the Army.

Licata’s unit leadership also played an integral role in securing the trophy for their squadron.

“I want to thank my chain of command for their support. I never had any issues and they were always there, 100% of the time if I had any concerns,” said Licata.

Retaining troopers also supports Operation People First initiatives, by working with troopers to find a balance between their needs and the Army’s needs.

Before presenting the trophy to Licata, Bradley said “what you do day in and day out is people first. Folks come into the Army with hopes and dreams, and when they come to you it’s about reconciling what’s out there with those hopes and dreams and those things that are going to keep them and their family part of the Army.”

According to the United States Army Recruiting Command Website, the labor market is challenging due to the Army being an all-volunteer force.

To learn more about the United States Army Recruiting Command, visit https://recruiting.army.mil/aboutUSAREC/

For more information about this story, call 254-423-5741 or email gabriela.s.thompson2.mil@army.mil

 

 

For more information about this story, call (254) 423-5741 or email gabriela.s.thompson2.mil@mail.mil.

FORT HOOD, Texas — Deputy chiefs of staff from Department of the Army’s G-1 (Personnel) and G-9 (Family, Morale, Welfare, and Recreation) divisions toured Fort Hood’s People First Center Oct. 7 as part of a staff assistance visit. During the visit, Lt. Gen. Gary Brito, deputy chief of staff, G-1 of the U.S. Army; and Lt. Gen. Jason Evans, deputy chief of staff, G-9 of the U.S. Army, were given demonstrations of the tools used in the center to help Soldiers and their families.

Maj. Gen. Michael Keating, deputy commander for support (U.K.) of III Corps and Fort Hood; Lt. Gen. Gary Brito, deputy chief of staff, G-1 of the U.S. Army; and Lt. Gen. Jason Evans, deputy chief of staff, G-9 of the U.S. Army, listen intently as Cpl. Elizabeth Allen-Perez provides some feedback following a sexual assault and suicide prevention demonstration at Fort Hood’s new People First Center Oct. 7. (U.S. Army photo by Brandy Cruz, Fort Hood Public Affairs)

 

Sgt. 1st Class Amanda Hoover, deputy commandant of the Fort Hood People First Center, speaks with Lt. Gen. Jason Evans, deputy chief of staff, G-9 of the U.S. Army; Lt. Gen. Gary Brito, deputy chief of staff, G-1 of the U.S. Army, and other officials about the People First Center Oct. 7. (U.S. Army photo by Brandy Cruz, Fort Hood Public Affairs)

 

Sgt. Maj. Frank Florez, III Corps Sexual Harassment/Assault Response & Prevention sergeant major, speaks to the observing audience following a suicide prevention demonstration by Spc. Chazmin Williams, 48th Chemical Brigade, and Spc. Ke Mitchell, 3rd Cavalry Regiment, Oct. 7, at the Fort Hood People First Center. (U.S. Army photo by Brandy Cruz, Fort Hood Public Affairs)