Fort Hood News Archive

One load of donated toys displayed
One load of donated toys for 11th Corps Signal Brigade’s (CSB) toy drive was displayed before Soldiers added it to their donation box on November 22 2021, Fort Hood TX.
U.S. Army Photo by Spc. Garrett Dacko, 11th Corps Signal Brigade.

FORT HOOD, Texas – Members of the 11th Corps Signal Brigade will deliver toys from the unit’s toy drive to the Baylor Scott & White McLane Children’s Medical Hospital in Temple, Texas, Dec. 16.

In coordination with the hospital’s director of philanthropy, 11th Corps Signal Brigade has held a toy drive over the last month to collect toys for the children. The morning of Dec. 16, volunteers from the brigade will collect toys from various donation boxes to load them into vehicles. Once loaded, they will convoy in personal vehicles to the hospital in order to drop off the donations.

The end goal for the unit’s donation drive is to bring happiness to these children by ensuring each of them get something for Christmas. “Some of these children are dying …” Sgt. James Sowell, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 11th Corps Signal Brigade, the head coordinator for the drive, elaborated. “They’re facing things that I would never want to face at that age, when they should be out playing. Even just for a second, if we can make a child smile by giving them a toy, that’s all that matters.”

Media representatives interested in covering the event should contact the 11th Corps Signal Brigade Public Affairs Representative at (573) 382-7912 or email at 11thTTSBPublicAffairsOffice@gmail.com by noon Dec. 15.

Media who R.S.V.P. should arrive at the Baylor Scott & White McLane Children’s Medical Hospital at 11:30 a.m. Dec. 16.

On Monday, Lt. Gen. Robert “Pat” White, commanding general, III Corps, will present the Army Award for Maintenance Excellence to 3rd Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 3rd Armored Brigade Combat Team during a ceremony at 11 a.m. on Fort Hood.

The award is presented annually by the Chief of Staff of the Army and it recognizes units that have demonstrated excellence in maintenance operations. The unit was evaluated on effectiveness and Soldier competency.

The Department of the Army established the award to recognize exceptional accomplishments in maintenance in 1982. Each year units compete at different echelons and one unit is selected per category.

Media desiring to cover this event must RSVP to Master Sgt. Miriam Espinoza at miriam.espinozatorres.mil@army.mil or 254-247-4075 no later than 5 p.m. Dec. 10.

A public affairs representative will meet the media at the south parking lot of Marvin Leath Visitors Center located on T. J. Mills Blvd. at 10:30 a.m. for an escort to the event.

 

The annual Christmas with the CAV concert will be held Dec. 10 at 7 p.m. on Fort Hood. The 1st Cavalry Division band will play a 90-minute concert for Soldiers, Families, and the public at Howze Theater.

The concert happens every year and it’s a spectacular presentation of musical talent by the division’s band, which is orchestrated, planned, and rehearsed months in advance.

This year, the concert is open to the public, anyone wishing to attend that is 5 years of age or older must be vaccinated. Non DoD ID cardholders should arrive to the visitor’s center well in advance to obtain a pass and make the event.

Media desiring to cover this event must RSVP to Maj. Timmy Watts at timmy.d.watts.mil@army.mil or 254-288-2607 no later than 5 p.m. on Dec. 10.

A public affairs representative will meet the media at the south parking lot of Marvin Leath Visitors Center located on T. J. Mills Blvd. at 6:30 p.m. for an escort to the event.

FORT HOOD, Texas — Trees for Troops has donated hundreds of trees to be given away to Fort Hood Soldiers in grades E-1 to E-4 beginning at 8 a.m. Dec. 10 at the Fort Hood Stadium here.

E-5 and above, and all DoD cardholders pick up times are 10 a.m. – until trees are gone.

Everyone must present a valid military identification card at the time of pick-up. Please come prepared to load your own tree and bring tie down ropes or string.

Trees for Troops, a program of the Christmas Spirit Foundation, provides free, farm-grown Christmas Trees to members in all branches of the U.S. military and their Families, through donations, sponsorship, grants and the work of many volunteers. For more information visit www.treesfortroops.org.

Since 2005, more than 225,319 free, farm-grown Christmas trees have been provided to troops and military Families in the United States and overseas through Trees for Troops.

Trees are provided on a first come, first serve basis while supplies last.

Media interested in attending the event should call (254) 291-2317 by 4 p.m. Dec. 9. On Dec. 10, media should meet the Public Affairs escort at 7:30 a.m. in the south side parking lot of the Marvin Leath Visitor Center.

FORT HOOD, Texas — The 9th Hospital Center is scheduled to hold a change of command ceremony at 10 a.m. December 10 on Sadowski Field.

Col. Dave Hamilton will relinquish command to Col. Nate Forrester. Forrester, who previously served here as the 1st Medical Brigade executive officer, comes to the Longhorn Team from the Office of the Surgeon General.

Hamilton, who originally entered the Army in 1987 as a private first class, took command of the 1st Medical Brigade in December 2019 just before the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic reaching the states.

The unit had been preparing for a deployment to support Operation Inherent Resolve in Iraq when they dove feet first into helping combat COVID. In March of 2020, with no-notice, he pivoted his formation from a wartime posture to COVID response, deploying his entire unit within 7-days to New York. This unprecedented mission resulted in the establishment of largest alternate care facility hospital in the DoD, providing medical treatment of 1,095 civilian COVID patients, and critical support to a beleaguered health system.

He still prepared his unit for deployment to Iraq, leaving in February 2021 for a 9-month rotation. Before returning last month, Hamilton served as he served as Combined Joint Task Force – Operation Inherent Resolve and Task Force Medical Commander and Combined Joint Task Force Surgeon in Iraq, Syria, Jordan, and Kuwait. He led 8 subordinate units, including Navy and Air Force units, and was responsible for 200 service members who performed a wide array of general medical and even surgical procedures.

“The Soldiers of the 9th HC Longhorns have been in the field or deployed, applying the medical power of the nation since I arrived,” said Hamilton. “I am incredibly thankful for the sacrifice and patience of the Families of the 9th Hospital Center over the las 2 years of COVID-19 response and travel restrictions, deployments at short notice and to far-away lands, as well as cities in the US. It has not been easy, but we have worked together to succeed.”

“Over the last 2 years, the 9th Hospital Center projected vital medical power of the 1st Medical Brigade and Army Medicine across the globe – establishing a historic, one of a kind COVID treatment hospital at the Javits New York Medical Center in downtown New York City as part of the whole of nation Response to COVID-19, deploying units to provide medical and veterinary care to Africa, Kosovo, the Pacific Region and most recently to Iraq, leading Task Force Med 9 to provide medical support to Operation Inherent Resolve forces in Iraq, Syria, Jordan and Kuwait,” Hamilton continued. “The Longhorns continue to live up to their motto – Go Get ‘Em!”

Media wishing to attend this event should RSVP with Cpt. Tyson Friar by email at tyson.l.friar.mil@army.mil, or phone at (580) 284-3185 by 4 p.m. December 9.

Media attending will meet in the south side parking lot of the Fort Hood visitors center on T.J. Mills Blvd. no later than 9:30 a.m. on the morning of December 10.

The 9th Hospital Center deployed the first wave of medical Soldiers Mar.25, 2020 from Fort Hood, Texas heading to Fort Dix, New Jersey, where they will begin augmenting the medical professionals in the New York City area in the fight against COVID-19. These units plan and train year-round and remain ready to provide defense support of civil authorities to help protect the American people during man-made and natural disasters. U.S. Army photo by Capt. Tyson Friar, 13th ESC Public Affairs
Col Roger S. Giraud (center), commander of the 1st Medical Brigade, greeted Col. Dave Hamilton (right), the 9th Hospital Center commander, following the 9th Hospital Center, 1st Medical Brigade’s redeployment to Fort Hood following a 9 month deployment to Iraq, where they served as Task Force Med at the Baghdad Diplomatic Support Center, in support of Operation Inherent Resolve, on Nov. 8, 2021. U.S. Army photo by Capt. Tyson Friar, 13th ESC Public Affairs

The 1st Cavalry Division Artillery will receive toy donations for Soldiers & Families at the brigade’s headquarter building Dec. 7 from 11:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m., Fort Hood, Texas.

DIVARTY is partnered with Leon County as part of the Adopt-a-unit program and the county’s community has donated toys for Soldiers and Families of the unit during the holidays for 12 years.

Media desiring to cover this event must RSVP to Master Sgt. Miriam Espinoza at miriam.espinozatorres.mil@army.mil or 254-247-4075 no later than 9 a.m. on Dec 7th.

A public affairs representative will meet the media at the south parking lot of Marvin Leath Visitors Center located on T. J. Mills Blvd. at 10:30 a.m. for an escort to the event.

FORT HOOD, Texas — Trees for Troops has donated hundreds of trees to be given away to Fort Hood Soldiers in grades E-1 to E-4 beginning at 8 a.m. Dec. 10 in Fort Hood Stadium here.

E5 and Above, and All DoD Cardholders: Pick up times are 10:00am – Until trees are gone

Must present a valid military ID at the time of pick-up during 8:00am – 10:00am. Please come prepared to load your own tree and bring tie downs rope or string

Trees for Troops, a program of the Christmas Spirit Foundation, provides free, farm-grown Christmas Trees to members in all branches of the U.S. military and their Families, through donations, sponsorship, grants and the work of many volunteers. For more information visit www.treesfortroops.org.

Since 2005, more than 225,319 free, farm-grown Christmas trees have been provided to troops and military Families in the United States and overseas through Trees for Troops.

Trees are provided on a first come, first serve basis while supplies last. Military active duty or dependent identification card required.

Media interested in attending the event should call (254) 291-2317 by 4 p.m. Dec. 9. On Dec. 10, media should meet the Public Affairs escort at 7:30  a.m. in the south side parking lot of the Marvin Leath Visitor Center.

by Col. Chad R. Foster
U.S. Army Garrison Fort Hood commander

FORT HOOD, Texas — The Fort Hood People First Center is a unique initiative with the potential to have a significant impact on individual leaders, units, and organizations across the entire Army. This effort is not simply putting a new sign in front of an old building. Instead, the People First Center is an important part of Fort Hood’s investment in our men and women in uniform.

As a centralized, installation-level leader certification and education facility, this center aims to positively shape organizational culture so that we can get closer to eradicating the harmful factors that undermine trust within units and organizations. Although not a panacea for all the challenges that the Army faces, it is an enormous opportunity to bolster the trust which is so critical in the doctrine of Mission Command.

What separates the Fort Hood People First Center from existing programs is its innovative developmental model that focuses on prevention through the delivery of immersive, scenario-based developmental experiences. The aim is to assist Soldiers and Leaders in identifying harmful behaviors and to provide a proactive approach to eradicating those behaviors from our formations.

Resources and expertise have been available for years across the Army’s installations. Family Advocacy Programs, Sexual Assault and Harassment Prevention (SHARP) offices, and many other agencies have worked diligently for years. However, the majority of the focus has been on response and victim services. The Army has not yet made sufficient progress in rooting out the thinking and attitudes that enable harmful behaviors. To change this reality, we must bring resources to bear in new ways to shape the basic, taken-for-granted beliefs and assumptions that constitute the deepest level of organizational culture. PowerPoint briefings and online training will not suffice. Prevention demands something more.

The Fort Hood People First Center aims to prevent harmful behaviors through a developmental model that relies on the scientifically proven value of experiential learning. The focus in this learning model moves from “instructor-centric” to “student-centric” learning. Personal experiences shape thinking and behavior in a fundamental way. With this in mind, the People First Center immerses units in a series of specially designed exercises that provide learning experiences in a safe, structured environment under the tutelage of certified experts and their own unit leadership. Those experiences impact individual thinking and attitudes in a way that lectures and PowerPoint briefings cannot match. The People First Center’s three-day Transformation Course delivers this developmental experience directly to company-level organizations, reinforcing trust, cohesion, and inclusiveness. By doing so, it contributes directly to the readiness and lethality of our Soldiers and units.

An interdisciplinary team of subject matter experts from Family Advocacy, SHARP, Equal Opportunity (EO), Master Resilience Training (MRT), Army Substance Abuse Program (ASAP), Suicide Awareness, and Spiritual Readiness Team (SRT) collaborate with the People First Center cadre to build scenarios that link experience to outcomes. The first step is developing a clear, succinct description of the behaviors, knowledge, and attributes that the exercise aims to instill in Soldiers. These constitute the desired outcomes of the exercise. The next step is to identify the observable indicators of success in achieving these outcomes as well as the conditions under which those indicators would potentially emerge. After all of this is complete, the team creates scenarios that place the participants in those conditions.

The resulting exercises immerse Soldiers in realistic situations that move learning from the theoretical to the practical. Soldiers take ownership of the learning as they observe and interact with role players to experience the impacts of words and actions. A young Private might find himself sitting with a group of peers who are making sexually explicit comments about a newly arrived comrade. Likewise, a Sergeant might observe the harassment of another Soldier in the workplace. In every case, the exercise participants have to decide what to do or say as the events unfold. Upon conclusion, a detailed After Action Review links action (or inaction) to consequence.

Execution is the most challenging aspect of this program. To ensure success, specially-vetted volunteers from across the installation complete a deliberate certification process focusing on mastering the art of facilitating the developmental exercises that are the hallmark of the People First Center’s program. Cadre typically serve for up to 12 months with the People First Center before returning to their units as experienced and certified positive influencers. To ensure continuity, a standing Board of Directors oversees the Fort Hood People First Center. This board includes senior officers and civilians who provide expertise and resources. These individuals also provide the critical eye necessary to assess the program’s effectiveness in the long term.

The Fort Hood People First Center delivers resources through learning in innovative ways that aim at prevention rather than reaction. The delivery of an immersive, realistic developmental experience is what makes the program different from other initiatives. For those Soldiers who already embody the Army’s values, the People First Center’s developmental program helps to better equip them to influence others and, when necessary, to intervene. They become more decisive because they become active vs reactive. Young Soldiers lacking the social skills and judgement to recognize when their words and actions are unacceptable will gain an increased set of experiences to help guide them. Units as a whole depart the People First Center more attuned to warning signs and ready to take positive action.

The Fort Hood People First Center will continue to evolve in response to the needs of our Soldiers and Families. Many of the problems that our Army confronts today are also matters of concern for our public schools, universities, and local municipalities. This presents us with an opportunity to deliberately share intellectual capital in the study of common problems and in developing transferable solutions. The cities and towns outside of our military installations have a shared interest in this endeavor because Soldiers live, shop, and play alongside the local citizenry. We are, in reality, all part of a single, interconnected community. The People First Center can serve as a focal point for such collaboration when appropriate. Today, multiple institutions of higher learning and community officials in Central Texas have expressed interest in exploring these types of opportunities.

“People First” is not simply rhetoric at Fort Hood. Leaders across the installation are investing in their Soldiers and their Families. The People First Center is a tangible manifestation of that investment. It will not solve all of the problems that we face, but it will add to the efforts of commanders and leaders at all levels who are already decisively engaged in this important fight. There is a lot of work yet to be done across the entire Army, and none involved in this effort will ever feel completely satisfied.

We owe it to our Soldiers to remain focused until we eradicate the harmful factors that undermine trust and impact the combat power within our units. The Fort Hood People First Center will get us closer to that goal by helping to prevent tragedy rather than simply reacting to its aftermath.

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EDITOR’S NOTE: Col. Chad R. Foster is currently the Garrison commander at Fort Hood, Texas. He is an Armor officer who has served in a variety of command and staff positions since being commissioned in 1998. He is a member of the Fort Hood People First Center’s Board of Directors. This article was republished with permission from the editor-in-chief of “From the Green Notebook.” The article was originally published Dec. 1 on their Website.

FORT HOOD, Texas – 48th Chemical Brigade will conduct Spartan Phalanx, the brigade’s leadership validation exercise Dec. 9-10 across various locations within the installation.

As the only active-duty chemical brigade in the Army, the 48th Chemical Brigade’s Spartan Phalanx will bring together battalion and company-level leaders within the Chemical Corps from units spanning across nine different installations to Fort Hood to participate in the event.

Spartan Phalanx will serve as a teambuilding, mental and physical event that challenges leader’s fitness, perseverance, and basic Soldering skills. Leaders who complete the crucible will be awarded the sought-after Hippies Belt Buckle, signifying their completion of Spartan Phalanx and validation of a leader within the 48th Chemical Brigade.

Media representatives interested in covering the event should contact the 48th Chemical Brigade Public Affairs Representative at (254) 206-6661 or email at Nicholas.a.hughes14.mil@army.mil by noon Dec. 8.

Media who R.S.V.P. should arrive at the Marvin Leath Visitors Center at 8 a.m. Dec. 9 to be escorted to the event.

By Maj. Michael P. Brabner, Test Officer, Maneuver Test Directorate, U.S. Operational Test Command

Yuma Test Center, Arizona. — Deep in the desert here, two Ivy Division tank crews of the 3rd Armored Brigade Combat Team recently tested the Army’s newest 120mm tactical service round.

Under 112 degree-plus heat, they simulated combat missions with full ready rack combat loads of the XM-1147 Advanced Multi-Purpose (AMP) round for their M1A2 Abrams Main Battle Tanks against a host of actual and simulated threat targets.

Tank Crew 1 commanded by 2nd Lt. Jake Hall, with Gunner Sgt. Spencer Vanderbilt, Loader Pvt. Dalton Diserio, and Driver Pvt. Justin Jones, not only knows what it feels like to roll out in a fully combat loaded tank on an operationally-realistic simulated mission, but they have witnessed the firepower the AMP round brings to the fight.

“This round is not something to be taken lightly,” said Vanderbuilt, of Charlie Company “Crazy Horse,” 1st Battalion “Fighting Eagles” of the 8th Infantry Regiment.

“Being able to see and then destroy anti-tank guided missile targets beyond 2,000 meters and then transition immediately to breaching walls or obstacles is an incredibly powerful feeling!”

“We now know what it feels like to roll out in a fully combat loaded tank on operationally realistic combat missions and recognize how important the AMP round will be to U.S. Army ABCT fighting forces in the fights yet to be fought,” added Hall.

Tank Crew 2, commanded by Staff Sgt. Nicholas Smearman, with Gunner Sgt. Juan Segura, Loader Spc. Blake Phillips, and Driver Pvt. Adam Allwine, also unleashed AMP fury on the same host of targets in the Yuma desert.

Phillips, said he was amazed by the AMP round’s performance and awesome power.

“The Abrams Tank’s lethality has been re-vAMP’ed!” he said.

Capabilities of the AMP round included the new airburst mode and breaching double reinforced concrete walls.

After shooting over 90 AMP rounds at anti-tank guided missile teams, massed infantry, infantry fighting vehicles and bunker targets, the Crazy Horse armored crews unanimously agreed training conducted during the test was the best in their careers.

The tankers pushed each other hard, testing the AMP round in what evolved into a competitive shooting competition in the Yuma desert, both day and night.

Test Team Master Gunner Vehicle Crew Evaluator Master Sgt. Joel Ramirez, of the Fort Hood, Texas-based U.S. Army Operational Test Command said the purpose of the operational testing is to collect performance data and Soldier feedback to inform the Army’s procurement decision regarding the AMP round.

“We do this by having the tank crews employ the tactical service round in a manner and in an environment that closely mimics combat conditions,” said Ramirez.

He went on to explain how the 3rd ABCT tank crews shot over 8 complex modified tank gunnery combat scenarios during the four-day record test.

“Despite extreme desert heat, dust storms and rain squalls, the Crazy Horse crews really impressed me with their level of motivation and drive to test the AMP round,” said Mr. Kent Evans, the Maneuver Requirements Division Soldier and Capability representative from Fort Benning, Georgia.

The XM-1147 Advanced Multi-Purpose (AMP) round was designed to enhance a tank crew’s ability to perform missions with greater lethality and survivability, according to Mr. Jeff McNaboe, lead project engineer, Program Manager for Maneuver Ammunition Systems.

Developed by engineers from Picatinny Arsenal, New Jersey, the Advanced Multi-Purpose (AMP) round is a replacement for 4 legacy service rounds.

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About the U.S. Army Operational Test Command:

Operational testing began Oct. 1, 1969, and as the Army’s only independent operational tester, OTC is celebrating “50 Years of Operational Testing.” The unit taps the “Total Army” (Active, National Guard, and Reserve) when testing Army, joint, and multi-service warfighting systems in realistic operational environments, using typical Soldiers to determine whether the systems are effective, suitable, and survivable. OTC is required by public law to test major systems before they are fielded to its ultimate customer – the American Soldier.

The Maneuver Test Directorate (MTD), based at Fort Hood, Texas, is the Operational Test Command’s lead directorate for conducting independent operational testing of infantry, armor, and robotic systems to inform acquisition and fielding decisions for the Army and select joint Warfighting systems. Poised, ready, and always able, MTD has and will remain the “go to” test directorate to provide the Army Futures Command and senior U.S. Army Leadership with the truthful test feedback they require to make informed decisions as to what capabilities will be brought to bear against future adversaries.