Fort Hood News Archive

Fort Hood, Texas – Defense Health Agency (DHA) Assistant Director for Health Care Administration, Dr. Brian Lein, and Central Texas Market Director and Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center Commander, Col. Daniel Moore, will host a virtual market establishment ceremony and teleconference media roundtable at Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center to introduce the Central Texas Market, Sept. 29.

The teleconference media roundtable will begin at 8 a.m. to discuss the new Central Texas Market and the future of military medicine in the region. The virtual ceremony will begin at 9 a.m. and will be live-streamed on the CRDAMC Facebook page due to COVID-19 restrictions.

 The purpose of the ceremony is to formally establish the transition of Central Texas-based military treatment facilities into a new military medical market within the DHA. A market is a group of hospitals and clinics in one geographic area working together with its TRICARE partners, Veterans Affairs hospitals, other federal health care organizations, private sector teaching hospitals and medical universities, and other health care partners. They operate as a system — sharing patients, staff, budget, and other functions to improve readiness and the delivery and coordination of health services.

Media interested in participating should contact the CRDAMC Public Affairs Office no later than Tuesday, Sept. 28 by 3 p.m. Teleconference information will be shared upon RSVP.

 

By: Maj. Gabby Thompson

3d Cavalry Regiment Public Affairs

FORT HOOD, Texas — Regimental leadership, troopers, past members of the regiment, community leaders and families gathered to dedicate a nameless baseball field, honoring the 39 troopers lost in the 2005 to 2006 deployment to Iraq in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom, September 24.

Over the last few months, 3d Cavalry Regiment has been updating the landscape, dedicating buildings, roads and fields to historic milestones in their 175-year regimental history.

“As part of our effort this year to make our slice of Fort Hood better, we are taking ownership of this field and giving it new purpose,” said Col. Kevin D. Bradley, commander of the 3d Cavalry Regiment.

16 years ago, Col. H.R. McMaster, the 71st colonel of the regiment, led a campaign named Operation Restoring Rights in partnership with the Iraqi army and police to liberate Tal Afar and its people from the violence and terroristic threats of Al Qaeda.

The regiment invested months of preparation, building an 8-foot earthen wall around the entire city and performing intense counterterrorism operations.

“The battle for Tal Afar began on September 2, 2005 and after 17 days of intense fighting, door-to-door searches and narrowly escaping booby-trapped houses, life returned to the city,” said Bradley.

The Gold Star family of Cpl. Jeffrey Williams joined the “Brave Rifles” for the ceremony, making the field dedication more poignant for the regiment.

A Gold Star Family is the immediate family member or members of a fallen service member who died while serving in a time of conflict.

Ms. Sandra Smith, Williams’ mother, and Jermaine Smith, his brother, both from Mansfield, Texas, sat in the front row during the ceremony dedication.

An avid boxer, Williams would often carry his boxing gloves with him on patrols. When asked why he carried them along, he was quoted as saying “because you never know when you’ll have the opportunity to fight!”

Williams served in the Regimental Support Squadron medical troop before he was killed on September 5, 2005 after an improvised explosive device detonated near his vehicle.

Williams’ family later visited the 3d Cavalry Regiment headquarters to see where their fallen trooper’s picture and biography hang on the wall alongside other fallen members of the regiment.

“Their photos line the walls of our regiment, and this field will serve as a lasting reminder of the seen and unseen wounds for those who battled on behalf of our nation and the regiment,” Bradley said in his final comments to the audience.

3d Cavalry Regiment leaders and staff, community leaders and Cpl. Jeffrey Williams’ family take a group photo of the newly unveiled Tal Afar Field at Fort Hood, Texas, Sept. 24. (U.S. Army photo by Maj. Gabby Thompson)
Jermaine Smith (right), brother of Cpl. Jeffrey Williams, stands next to his mother, Sandra Smith, as she takes a moment to look at her son’s photograph that hangs on the 3d Cavalry Regiment headquarters building wall. Williams was killed Sept. 5, 2005 in Iraq after his vehicle was struck by a roadside bomb. (U.S. Army photo by Pfc. Michael Cossman)

Story by: Lt. Col. Jennifer J. Bocanegra, 1st Cavalry Division Public Affairs Officer

FORT HOOD, TEXAS- This morning at 9 a.m. on Cooper Parade Field, the 1st Cavalry Division hosted a parade to culminate the division’s centennial birthday and CAV Week festivities. The ceremony included performances by the 1st Cav. Div. band, a special cavalry charge by the 1st Cav. Div. Horse Cavalry Detachment and a helicopter flyover by the 1st Air Cavalry Brigade with retired U.S. Army Command Sgt. Maj. Rory Malloy, former division command sergeant major for 1st Cav. Div. from 2008 to 2011, serving as the reviewing official for the ceremony.

“It is indeed an honor to be back home with America’s First Team to celebrate our centennial where we honor the sacrifice and service of thousands of veterans throughout the history of the First Team who stepped up and served when our nation needed us most,” Malloy said during his remarks. “From our beginning, America’s First Team has fought in every major war since World War II …The sacrifice of our veterans is captured by the 43 Medals of Honor earned by America’s First Team as well as the veterans who have filled our ranks within the past 100 years.”

During the ceremony, the 1st Cav. Div. command team, Maj. Gen. John Richardson, commanding general and Command Sgt. Maj. Shade S. Mundy, division command sergeant major, honored troopers past and present who served with the division over the past 100 years with a recitation of the division’s distinguished history from its origins in September 1921 to present day support of U.S. military operations worldwide. Troopers from 1st Cav. Div.’s six brigades took part in the historical narrative while dressed in period uniforms including equipment from various campaigns that earned 1st Cav. Div.’s reputation as the nation’s premier armored force. Malloy also joined the command team in adding five additional streamers to the 1st Cav. Div. guidon representing the division support towards the Global War on Terrorism.

Veterans, local government leaders, nearby residents and military families came out to view the ceremony and tour interactive displays of vehicles and equipment stationed along the recently renamed Legends Way and at the 1st Cav. Div. museum.

This morning’s ceremony served as a grand finale wrapping up CAV Week, which ran from Sept. 20th thru 24th. Throughout the week, 1st Cav. Div. troopers participated in a variety of activities including a four-mile division run and team and individual sports competitions. The division command team also unveiled newly renamed Legends Way road.

For the remainder of this month, Richardson authorized 1st Cav. Div. troopers in a memo to wear the 1st Calvary Division Color Patch along with the CAV hat and spurs to inspire unit pride and build the Cavalry elan in the First Team. The division will continue to honor its 100-year legacy throughout the year during key observances and events.

The 1st Cavalry Division, also known as America’s First Team, was formally activated on September 13, 1921 at Fort Bliss, Texas and has distinguished itself during every major conflict since World War II. Today, more than 20,000 troopers serve within the 1st Cav. Div. ranks remaining ready to fight and win anywhere in the world.

During a special ceremony held on Cooper Field, Fort Hood, Texas, Sept. 24, troopers from 1st Cavalry Division dressed in period uniforms including equipment as part of an interactive historical narrative honoring the 100-year legacy of the 1st Cav. Div. This event served as a grand finale for CAV Week and included performances by the 1st Cav. Div. band and horse detachment.
U.S. Army Photo by: Sgt. 1st Class Robelyn Cooper, 1st Cavalry Division Sustainment Brigade, Fort Hood, Texas
During a special ceremony held on Cooper Field, Fort Hood, Texas, Sept. 24, the 1st Cavalry Division honored its 100-year legacy with a special cavalry charge that included AH-64E Apache and UH-60M helicopters from the 1st Air Cavalry Brigade, the 1st Cavalry Horse Detachment and cannon fire. This event served as a grand finale to CAV Week and paid tribute to 1st Cav. Div. troopers past and present.
U.S. Army Photo by: Sgt. Derek Greaves, 1st Air Cavalry Brigade, Fort Hood, Texas
Veterans from the 1st Calvary Division line up across the stage at Cooper Field, Fort Hood, Texas, Sept. 24, as part of a special ceremony honoring the 100-year legacy of the 1st Cav. Div. and serving as a grand finale to CAV Week. Veterans from previous conflicts including Korea, Vietnam, Iraq, Afghanistan and travelled across the country to take part in this event which included performances by the 1st Cav. Div. band and horse detachment.
U.S. Army Photo by: 2nd Lt. Delilah Palombo, 1st Cavalry Division Artillery Brigade, Fort Hood, Texas

Former division command sergeant major for the 1st Cavalry Division, retired Command Sgt. Maj. Rory Malloy, places five new streamers on the 1st Cav. Div. guidon alongside Maj. Gen. John Richardson, the 1st Cav. Div. commanding general, and Command Sgt. Maj. Shade S. Munday, the 1st Cav. Div. division command sergeant major. The new streamers represent 1st Cav. Div. participation in military campaigns in both Iraq and Afghanistan during the Global War on Terrorism.
U.S. Army Photo by: 2nd Lt. Delilah Palombo, 1st Cavalry Division Artillery Brigade, Fort Hood, Texas

By Mr. Mike Shelton, Airborne and Special Operations Test Directorate, U.S. Army Operational Test Command

FORT BRAGG, North Carolina – Operational testing of the Army’s newest generation sniper system — the MK-22 Precision Sniper Rifle (PSR) — marks the project’s final hurdle before fielding.

“The modular nature of the PSR allows it to be tailored to meet mission requirements and is appealing to airborne Snipers who are typically armed with long-barreled precision rifles of a single caliber offering,” said Sgt. 1st Class Marcus Love, ABNSOTD, Test Noncommissioned Officer.

Because of the single-caliber offerings, snipers requiring additional capabilities must deploy with additional weapons.

The PSR can be configured for multi-calibers by the Sniper in the field and requires no higher level maintenance to reconfigure.

It will also extend engagement ranges for both anti-material and anti-personnel target engagements.  

“The increased engagement range will keep Snipers safer and increase the options for the local commander employing these combat multipliers,” said Sgt. Austin Stevens, a Sniper assigned to the 1st Battalion, 325th Airborne Infantry Regiment, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division.

“With a folding stock and removable suppression system, the PSR will provide airborne Snipers a more compact load during airborne infiltration operations without reducing their lethality while providing a precision rifle platform more conducive to their combat environment,” said MK-22 Project NCO Sgt. 1st Class Jonathan Copley.

Spc. Michael Liptak, a Sniper with Headquarters & Headquarters Company, 2nd Battalion, 325th Infantry Regiment immediately identified the attributes of accuracy in regards to the MK-22.

“I was surprised at the accuracy and the straightforward approach to testing the PSR,” he said.

Prior to testing, Snipers from across the airborne and special operations community took part in new equipment training which included familiarization with the system, maintenance, target engagement, system configuration, and zeroing procedures.

For Spec. Nathanael Keffer, a Sniper with 2nd Battalion, 508th Infantry Regiment, the PSR’s versatility to adapt to multiple mission sets was a marked advantage.

 

“The PSR is a very versatile weapon system that can be tailored to meet multiple mission requirements,” he said.

Mr. Larry Harris, ABNSOTD Deputy Chief of Test said, “The critical task in testing any small arms platform intended for use by airborne forces is ensuring zero retention of the primary optic subsequent to airborne insertion.

“This is a critical gauge of the Paratrooper’s lethality during airfield seizure and other follow-on operations.”

To evaluate this performance measure of the PSR, the ABNSOTD test team applied the organization’s mobile weapons boresight collimator to the rifle after jumping to make sure the Sniper’s pre-mission zero was not degraded by shock during the jump.

“This process establishes a baseline for sight reticle locations prior to and post airborne insertion,” said Miles Crawford, Test Technology Branch Chief, ABNSOTD.

“Testers can monitor any shift in the weapon sight reticle that may have been induced by shock associated with static line parachutes,” he said.

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About the Airborne and Special Operations Test Directorate and the U.S. Army Operational test Command:

The Fort Bragg, North Carolina-based Airborne and Special Operations Test Directorate plans, executes, and reports on operational tests and field experiments of Airborne and Special Operations Forces equipment, procedures, aerial delivery and air transportation systems to provide key operational data for the continued development and fielding of doctrine, systems, and equipment to the Warfighter.

The U.S. Army Operational Test Command is based at West Fort Hood, Texas, and its mission ensures systems developed are effective in a Soldier’s hands and suitable for the environments in which they train and fight. Test unit Soldiers provide feedback by offering input to improve upon existing and future systems Soldiers will ultimately use to train and fight.

On Friday, Sept. 24, at 9 a.m., 1st Cavalry Division will host a parade, reception and interactive displays on Cooper Parade Field. This will be the culminating event for the division’s CAV Week. The ceremony  will include performances by the 1st Cavalry Division band, a special cavalry charge by the Horse Cavalry detachment and a flyover with the 1st Air Cavalry Brigade.

Gate call is at 8 a.m. Visitors not affiliated with media and without a DoD ID card, please go to the Marvin Leath Visitors Center located on T.J. Mills Blvd. by 7 a.m. for base access.

To RSVP for this event please contact a member of the 1st Cavalry Division Public Affairs office:

Lt. Col. Jennifer Bocanegra at jennifer.j.bocanegra.mil@army.mil or 254-423-6699

Maj. Terez Little at terez.m.little.mil@mail.mil or 254-424-6167

MSG Miriam Espinoza at miriam.espinozatorres.mil@army.mil or 254-247-4075.

By Maj. Dacharvrick Collins, Test Officer, Intelligence Electronic Warfare Test Directorate, U.S. Army Operational Test Command

FORT CARSON, Colorado — Soldiers of 4th Infantry Division tested new software allowing commanders to automate planning, coordination, and synchronization of Cyberspace Electromagnetic Activities (CEMA) throughout the Army’s operations process.

The Electronic Warfare Planning and Management Tool (EWPMT) integrates battlefield information and management of Electronic Warfare and Spectrum Management Operations (SMO) into a common operating environment.

The 2nd Stryker Brigade Combat Team (2SBCT) Soldiers received comprehensive New Equipment Training (NET) that familiarized them with EWPMT capabilities and functional support to unit EW and spectrum planning and operations.

During the test, the EWPMT system supported the unit’s targeting process by identifying and locating known High Payoff Targets. Additionally, 2SBCT Soldiers used EWPMT to perform SMO before and during their command post exercise.

“As a planner, EWPMT enabled me to visualize my effects in the electromagnetic spectrum (EMS),” said 2SBCT’s CEMA Chief, Chief Warrant Officer 2 Brandon Cruz. “The modeling and simulation tools EWPMT provides enabled me to position Electromagnetic Warfare (EW) systems onto the optimal piece of terrain on the battlefield.”

Cruz said, “When planning transitioned to current operations, we were able to transfer from non-lethal to lethal fires, completing sensor to shooter digitally from EWPMT to Army Field Artillery Tactical Data System (AFATDS). EWPMT increases the lethality of my brigade and I look forward to using it at the National Training Center (NTC) in November.”

Warrant Officer 1 Justin Dugan, EW Technician, with 1st Battalion of 2SBCT out of Joint Base Lewis-McChord agreed.

“EWPMTs ability to visualize the electromagnetic operational environment and manage EW sensors provides Commanders a powerful tool that enables them to compete within the electromagnetic spectrum,” he said.

Product Manager (PdM), Electronic Warfare Integration (EWI) plans to move into a Full Deployment Decision (FDD) in 2QFY22 allowing distribution throughout the Army.

~~

About the Intelligence Electronic Warfare Test Directorate:

IEWTD executes independent operational testing of intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR); EW; biometrics (BM); and intelligence analysis systems to inform acquisition and fielding decisions for Army and select multiservice warfighting systems. Additionally, IEWTD provides threat and ISR simulation and instrumentation support for internal and external test events.

About the U.S. Army Operational Test Command:

As the Army’s only independent operational tester, enlists the “Total Army” (Active, National Guard, and Reserve) when testing Army, joint, and multi-service warfighting systems in realistic operational environments, using typical Soldiers to determine whether the systems are effective, suitable, and survivable. OTC is required by public law to test major systems before they are fielded to its ultimate customer — the American Soldier.

The 1st Cavalry Division unveiled Legends Way yesterday in honor of Medal of Honor recipients who served at Fort Hood, Texas. Battalion Avenue, a long-standing road, which runs across the installation, was renamed to honor legends of previous conflicts who served with Fort Hood units.

“We have a lot of legends that we want to recognize, and along Legends Way, you’re going to see Medal of Honor recipients to inspire our Soldiers.”” said Maj. Gen. John Richardson, commander, 1CD.
“And when you read the stories of these Medal of Honor recipients you can’t be anything but inspired.”

Along the route there are a total of 48 Medal of Honor historical markers, 43 highlight recipients from the 1st Cavalry Division and an additional 5 MoH historical markers honor the recipients from 9th Cavalry Regiment which existed prior to 1CD.

“The purpose of Legends Way is to teach the younger generation of Troopers our history and for them to learn of legends before us who paved the way for us today,” said Command Sgt. Major Shade S. Munday, Command Sergeant Major, 1CD. “I want them to feel proud and to stop and learn about some of these MoH recipients during their run in the morning as they are out there doing PT with their teams.”

This year, 1CD celebrates its centennial birthday and renaming Battalion Ave. is just one way the division is honoring the legends who once wore the 1CD patch.

“This week is Cav Week and what we are doing this week is celebrating and focusing on building teams and unit pride,” said Richardson. “We scheduled this week alongside the 1CD Association so there will be thousands of veterans coming on post and interacting with our younger generation.”

The division has been working on renaming Battalion Ave. to Legends way for a year and although the project began as a smaller idea to rename just the section of the road that cover the division and it’s subordinate units, III Corps adopted the idea and the entirety of Battalion Ave. has been renamed to allow other units to highlight their heroes.

For any questions, please contact the 1st Cavalry Division Public Affairs Officer via mobile phone at (254) 423-6699 or by email at: jennifer.j.bocanegra.mil@army.mil.

Maj. Gen. John Richardson and Command Sgt. Maj. Shade S. Munday unveil a marker alongside Legends Way which highlights one of 43 Medal of Honor recipients who served with  the 1st Cavalry Division. Legends Way, formerly known as Battalion Ave., runs through the Fort Hood installation and showcases 48 Medal of Honor recipients post-wide. The installation of these markers is a way to connect younger Troopers with the legends who served before them. (Photo by Army Master Sgt. Miriam Espinoza, 1st Cavalry Division Public Affairs Office)

Maj. Gen. John Richardson and Command Sgt. Maj. Shade Munday unveil Legends Way roadway on Sep. 20 at Fort Hood, TX. Legends Way, formally known as Battalion Ave., runs post-wide through the Fort Hood installation and honors 48 Medal of Honor recipients, 43 who served with the 1st Cavalry Division. The installation of this signage is a way to connect younger Troopers with the legends who served before them. (Photo by Army Master Sgt. Miriam Espinoza, 1st Cavalry Division Public Affairs Office)
Maj. Gen. John Richardson and Command Sgt. Maj. Shade S. Munday unveil a marker alongside Legends Way which highlights one of 43 Medal of Honor recipients who served with the 1st Cavalry Division. Legends Way, formerly known as Battalion Ave., runs post-wide and honors 48 Medal of Honor recipients with markers along the route. The installation of these markers is a way to connect younger Troopers with the legends who served before them. (Photo by Army Master Sgt. Miriam Espinoza, 1st Cavalry Division Public Affairs Office)
Maj. Gen. John Richardson and Command Sgt. Maj. Shade S. Munday walk alongside newly unveiled Legends Way which honors 48 Medal of Honor recipients, 43 who served with the 1st Cavalry Division. Legends Way, formerly known as Battalion Ave., runs through the installation and honors Medal of Honor recipients along the route. The installation of these markers is a way to connect younger Troopers with the legends who served before them. (Photo by Army Master Sgt. Miriam Espinoza, 1st Cavalry Division Public Affairs Office)
Sgt. 1st Class Paul T. Ferguson, commandant, 1st Cavalry Division, hangs a banner up in preparation for the unveiling ceremony for Legends Way,  Sep. 20 at Fort Hood, TX. III Corps, Fort Hood Installation Management and 1st Cavalry Division coordinated to rename Battalion Ave. to Legends Way in remembrance of 48 Medal of Honor recipients, 43 who served with the 1st Cavalry Division.  (Photo by Army Master Sgt. Miriam Espinoza, 1st Cavalry Division)  through the entire installation and it will serve to remind Troopers or the legends before them. (Photo by Army Lt. Col. Jennifer Bocanegra, 1st Cavalry Division Public Affairs Office)
Warrior Way Commissary
Warrior Way Commissary

FORT HOOD, Texas – The Warrior Way Commissary will temporarily close Sept. 20 for repairs and pest mitigation.

The U.S. Army Garrison Fort Hood commander directed the closure to ensure the continued health and safety of commissary patrons, contractors, and employees while work is being completed.

“Our directorate of public works team is working hand in hand with Defense Commissary Agency officials to complete these repairs as quickly and safely as possible,” Col. Chad Foster, USAG Fort Hood commander said.

Repairs are expected to take 4-6 weeks. In the meantime, the Clear Creek Commissary will remain open 9 a.m. –  8 p.m. on Monday’s along with their normal hours the rest of the week while repairs are being completed.  Updates will be provided as information becomes available.

The First Team hosts “CAV Week” Sep. 20 through Sep. 24 in celebration of the division’s 100th Birthday.

Next week, the 1st Cavalry Division will host a variety of events across Fort Hood to commemorate its centennial birthday and honor Troopers past and present who served with the division during various conflicts. Events will include a division run, sports competitions, a parade and interactive displays. We will also unveil newly renamed Legends Way road. Throughout the week, veterans, family members and civilians are invited to come on base and tour equipment displays and engage with veterans and Troopers from the First Team.

Below are key events open to news media and the general public during the week:

Monday Sep. 20 at 11:30 a.m.: 1st Cavalry Division command teams will unveil Legends Way road and present the Medal of Honor historical markers. Gate call is at 11 a.m.

Friday Sep. 24 at 9 a.m.: 1st Cavalry Division will host a parade, reception and interactive displays on Cooper Parade Field. This culminating event will include performances by the 1st Cavalry Division band and a special cavalry charge with a flyover from the 1st Cavalry Horse detachment. Gate call is at 8 a.m.

Visitors not affiliated with media and without a DoD ID card, please go to the Marvin Leath Visitors Center located on T.J. Mills Blvd. by 7 a.m. for base access.

To RSVP to any of these events please contact the 1st Cavalry Division Public Affairs office at 254-287-9400 or MSG Miriam Espinoza at miriam.espinozatorres.mil@army.mil and MAJ Terez Little at terez.m.little.mil@army.mil.

The 1st Cavalry Division Band performs during a Change of Command ceremony while the 1st Air Cavalry Brigade conducts a flyover with the cavalry charge Jul. 21 at Cooper Field on Fort Hood, Texas. (Photo by U.S. Army Spc. Stephanie Rasch-Chavez, 1st Cavalry Division Band).
The Horse Cavalry Detachment performs a Cavalry Charge during a ceremony at Cooper Field on Fort Hood, Texas.

Maj. Gabby Thompson, 3d Cavalry Regiment Public Affairs

FORT HOOD, Texas — 3d Cavalry Regiment will host a Sisters in Arms mentorship event here Sept. 17 at the Community Center Events and Bingo Center.

The Sisters in Arms Mentorship Program – Fort Hood provides members an opportunity to gain knowledge, insights, networking opportunities, and connections from experienced leaders within the Army profession, as well as leaders within our greater Fort Hood Community and surrounding areas.

Programs are designed to foster career development, to expand personal and professional networks, to provide a safe and respectful forum to share experiences and insights, to cultivate future leaders, and to build friendships and teams at the lowest echelons on which we can continue to develop an environment founded on trust, dignity, and respect.

This mentorship program directly supports the III Corps Operation People First campaign and helps build up the capabilities of the next generation of leaders, while attempting to provide opportunities not widely known.

Sfc. Latoya Greene, from Regimental Engineer Squadron, 3d Cavalry Regiment will serve as the facilitator for the Friday event.

Greene won the Fort Hood Strongest Competition this past April, pulling a 5,600 pound dually truck during the series of events. She has also been a vocal advocate for soldiers on issues including resiliency, leadership, standards and fitness.

Sfc. Astin Muse and Sfc. Janina Simmons will be guest speakers at this event.

Simmons, assigned to 5-52 Air Defense Artillery Battallion, 11th Air Defense Artillery Brigade out of Fort Bliss, Texas was the second female non-commissioned officer to graduate the United States Army Ranger School, and the first black woman to do so.

Sfc. Astin Muse, assigned to Fort Knox, Kentucky is a cancer survivor and widely known as social media influencer Amuse. Her candid videos give her over 35,000 followers humorous glimpses into serious Army issues.

Muse has also been featured in Army Times Military Matters Podcast, most recently to discuss sexual harassment in the military.

This R.S.V.P. only event is open to all units on Fort Hood and will be streamed live on NCOPD Live.

Media representatives interested in covering the event should contact 3d Cavalry Regiment Public Affairs at  (254) 423-5741, or email gabriela.s.thompson2.mil@mail.mil by 3 p.m. Sep 16.

Media who RSVP should arrive at the Marvin Leath Visitors Center Sep. 16 at 7:45 a.m. to be escorted to the event.