Fort Hood News Archive

By Mr. Mike Shelton, Airborne and Special Operations Test Directorate, U.S. Army Operational Test Command

FORT BRAGG, North Carolina – Some of the nation’s elite Soldiers with the 82nd Airborne Division and 3rd Special Forces Group have finalized testing the Army’s new Parachutist Flotation Device (PFD).

Preparation for the PFD test started in mid-April 2021 with the Airborne and Special Operations Test Directorate performing intentional water landings in Jordan Lake, North Carolina, according to Maj. Camden S. Jordan, ABNSOTD’s executive officer.

“Planners synchronized early with local emergency management, law enforcement and state wildlife agencies to help support the Army’s water operations on Jordan Lake,” said Jordan said.

Jordan went on to say rehearsals took place for the multi-tiered and complex infiltration technique before final testing in June.

“Located just West of Raleigh, North Carolina, Jordan Lake is one of North Carolina’s most pristine waterways, so these agencies provided swift water rescue teams, emergency medical technicians, small boat support and assisted in routing boaters away from the water drop zone while airborne operations are underway,” he said.

“We relied heavily upon the support of the community to execute this test. Local emergency services were the lynchpin to this entire test and could not have been executed without their outstanding support,” said Sgt. 1st Class John Reed, ABNSOTD’s Operations NCOIC.

According to Dan Shedd, Senior Mechanical Engineer Developmental Command at Natick, Massachusetts, military planners try real hard to keep airborne operations away from bodies of water.

He said on occasion, though, paratroopers can engage high value targets near large bodies of water so they must be equipped accordingly for safety.

With flotation bladders that can be inflated using an internal carbon dioxide (CO2) gas cylinder or an oral inflation tube, once employed in the water, the PFD becomes critical in saving lives.

Shedd explained how the PFD must suspend a combat-equipped jumper in a “lifesaving” posture for an extended period following an airborne infiltration.

“In real-world scenarios,” he said, “this critical time allows recovery teams time to locate and extract jumpers in the event of a water landing.”

Reed said operational testing with Soldiers during early June saw participating paratroopers undergoing intensive training cycles geared toward preparing for deliberate water operations.

That training began with new equipment training (NET) so the Soldiers could practice the proper rigging techniques and activation procedures required using the PFD.

“Anytime two lifesaving devices are being employed by one Soldier, intense attention to detail is required for both proper fit and wear as well as how these systems interact during airborne infiltration,” said Staff Sgt. Jonathan R. Copley an ABNSOTD Military Freefall Master Jumpmaster.

The rigorous NET training test jumps required the test Soldiers of 82nd Airborne Division and 3rd Special Forces Group to complete a full combat water survival test (CWST) conducted in Fort Bragg’s Mott Lake.

Sgt. 1st Class Steven Branch, a platoon Sergeant and Jumpmaster assigned to C Company 2nd Battalion 501st Parachute Infantry Regiment, gave the PFD a thumbs-up.

“The PFD is much easier to rig for static line operations,” he said. “We barely noticed having it on, and it can easily suspend a Soldier with combat equipment for a long time if needed.

“Overall I was very impressed with every aspect of the PFD.”  

ABNSOTD used the PFD test to train parachute riggers from across the airborne and special operations community in the proper maintenance and care of the new life-saving apparatus once they return to home station.

This “maintainer” training included system maintenance, repacking, repair, proper storage, handling, as well as rigging and employment during water landings.

Sgt. Issa Yi, a parachute rigger with the 151st Quarter Master Company said, “The PFD was easy to pack and required no special tools or materials to maintain.”

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About the U.S. Army Operational Test Command:

The Fort Bragg, North Carolina-based ABNSOTD plans, executes, and reports on operational tests and field experiments of Airborne and Special Operations Forces equipment, procedures, aerial delivery and air transportation systems to provide key operational data for the continued development and fielding of doctrine, systems, and equipment to the Warfighter.

The U.S. Army Operational Test Command is based at West Fort Hood, Texas, and its mission ensures systems developed are effective in a Soldier’s hands and suitable for the environments in which they train and fight. Test unit Soldiers provide feedback by offering input to improve upon existing and future systems Soldiers will ultimately use to train and fight.

An M1087 Expandable Van Shelter houses the Command Post Integrated Infrastructure (CPI2) System under operational test by Soldiers of the 2nd Infantry Division’s 2nd Stryker Brigade Combat Team at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Washington. (Photo by Sgt. 1st Class Frederick E. Estep, Test and Evaluation NCO, Mission Command Test Directorate, U.S. Army Operational Test Command)

By Mr. Shelby R. Schoolcraft, Military Test Plans Analyst, Mission Command Test Directorate, U.S. Army Operational Test Command

JOINT BASE LEWIS-McCHORD, Washington — A potential Army Command Post prototype underwent operational testing during the annual Bayonet Focus Exercise here recently.

Soldiers of the 2nd Infantry Division’s 2nd Stryker Brigade Combat Team tried out the Command Post Integrated Infrastructure (CPI2) System gear while preparing for their upcoming National Training Center rotation.

2nd SBCT used the CPI2 vehicles as their sole Mission Command centers for the exercise duration, according to Ms. Marjorie Gill, Test Officer, with the Fort Hood, Texas-based Mission Command Test Directorate, U.S. Army Operational Test Command.

They also did a series of jump scenarios to demonstrate the CPI2 ability to be torn down, moved, and set up again quickly.

“Soldiers provided individual observations and opinions on how the system might be improved,” said Gill. “Any issues they had with the system and comments on how their organization might use the system as part of their CP were also invited.”

The CPI2 integrates capabilities on Mission Command Platforms (MCP) and Command Post Support Vehicles (CPSV), aligning with the Army’s Command Post (CP) efforts to enhance Brigade and higher echelons with Mission Command (MC) resources on any battlefield, she explained.

Currently, Army CPs at the higher commands are quite large and require a long period to set up and tear down, Shelby said.

“This all lends itself to limited survivability, maneuverability, and suitability with such a large footprint,” she said.

The CPI2 system’s goal is to use a combination of various vehicle platforms and shelter systems, which allow different levels of command posts the functionality needed while increasing survivability by being able to tear down and move locations fast, according to CPI2 Program Manager David Delgado.

“CPI2 integrates emerging technologies and capabilities with mobile mission command platforms and command post support vehicles for improved agility and survivability on the battlefield,” he said.

While the CPI2 program is in its infancy, the Product Office CPI2 is designing the CPI2 system in two increments.

The current test was part of Increment 0. Delgado said, “This increment involves multiple phases of prototyping, integration, and follow-on formal design decisions resulting in the fielding of a standardized CPI2 command post to 5 different Brigade Combat Team (BCT) configurations as part of Capability Set (CS) 23.”

Army Capability Sets are the Army’s plan to ensure the force keeps pace with advancements in network technology and the ability to deliver a modernized tactical network to Soldiers to achieve all-domain dominance over time, he explained.

“Army Evaluation Command (AEC) at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland will use these data points to determine effectiveness, suitability, and survivability of CPI2,” said Capt. Douglas Jordan, AEC Effectiveness Evaluator.

Delgado said with the current assessment complete the Army will conduct further tests to balance technical maturity, integration of design, operational relevance, and affordability for a final design decision during early 2022.

“Production on the selected system will begin in FY22 for fielding in FY23,” he said.

The next phases of testing, according to DelGado, will involve units different from 2nd SBCT, so the Army gains a better perspective of how the current system design will support command post operations of the various units in today’s Army.

~~

About the U.S. Army Operational Test Command:

OTC taps the Total Army when testing Army, joint, and multi-service warfighting systems in realistic operational environments, using typical Soldiers to determine whether the systems are effective, suitable, and survivable. OTC is required by public law to test major systems before they are fielded to its ultimate customer — the American Soldier.

OTC’s Mission Command Test Directorate tests systems for a net-centric environment that will process and transmit voice, data, messaging and video information through networks at the tactical, operational, strategic and sustaining base levels.

FORT HOOD, Texas: Becoming a non-commissioned officer was always a goal for Sgt. Patrick Hering as he progressed through a career as a Combat Medic with the 1st Medical Brigade. However, like many of his medic peers, Hering has had a diverse career leading him from being a line medic to serving in an administrative role within the 1st Medical Brigade headquarters. Hering’s path is similar to many regardless of military occupation, as everyday Soldiers enter the non-commissioned officer ranks feeling unprepared due to the lack of opportunity in deployments or training. After 20 years of executing contingency operations overseas supporting the Global War on Terrorism, the Army’s training and administrative enablers have also matched the Army’s new readiness posture, decreasing once available opportunities. To bridge the current capacity gap, the 1st Medical Brigade developed the School of the Strong Knight.

“First and foremost, School of the Strong Knights is a leadership development and certification program,” said Col. Roger Giraud, Commander of the 1st Medical Brigade. “It’s aimed at teaching our junior leaders, specifically Staff Sergeants and Sergeants , the fundamentals of our craft in the Army profession,” continued Giraud.

The School of the Strong Knights is conducted in partnership with the 4th Battalion, 3rd Security Forces Assistance Brigade on Fort Hood, Texas. The School of the Strong Knight lasts ten days, putting the non-commissioned officers through convoy operations, battle drills, and reviewing their organization’s standard operating procedures (SOP) and tactics, techniques, and procedures (TTP). “My background is mostly in a clinical environment. This program has given me a wide breadth of invaluable information about my organization,” said Staff Sgt. David Ash, a Senior Radiology Technician.

Before completing the School of the Strong Knights, all non-commissioned officers must qualify with their assigned weapon, lead and pass an Army Combat Fitness Test (ACFT), and pass a driver’s training management program. “This class gives me a great base for my Army leadership rucksack; this foundation will help give me the necessary tools to serve my Soldiers better,” said Hering.

The School of the Strong Knights approach is also unique by having the non-commission officers understand the subject material drive the pace of the class. “We find that non-commissioned officer explaining to their peers in a non-judgment environment mitigates knowledge gaps and increases confidence,” said Sgt. 1st Class Brian Divine, the Operation Non-Commissioned Officer responsible for running the School of the Strong Knight.

“We just ran the second iteration and brought Sergeants and trainers from every post that the Silver Knight Brigade has a unit. Under the supervision of the Hospital Centers’ Command Sergeants Major, Forts Carson, Bliss, and Polk will implement the program to build Strong Sergeants,” said Command Sgt. Maj. Robert Jackson II, the 1st Medical Brigade Command Sergeant Major.

The 1st Medical Brigade intends to conduct a pilot course of the School of the Strong Knight for pre-command Officers in the 1st Quarter, FY 2022 for future company and detachment commanders to ensure they are ready to face the rigor of command.

“The teams, squads, and sections are the basic unit-level…they are at the point of contact. These units will encounter the patients first, these units will execute the basic mission sets, and these levels of leaders work day in and day out with their Soldiers. If we build Strong Sergeants at this level, trust will be built between leaders and their subordinates…this is putting People First,” said Giraud.

 

FORT HOOD, Texas — While serving at Fort Knox, Kentucky supporting the Cadet Summer Training mission, Sgt. Aaron Matthews and Pfc. Korbin Kuhn -both assigned to 3rd Squadron, 3d Cavalry Regiment- intervened and prevented a sexual assault incident.

Matthews of Swartz Creek, Michigan, and Kuhn of Hot Springs, Arkansas, were performing their assigned duties, when they noticed something was not right and immediately separated two service members before anything happened.

The Fort Knox and United States Army Cadet Command leadership presented Wilson and Kuhn with awards for their actions on Jul. 20 at Fort Knox.

“These two took care of one of their own and their example deserved recognition,” said Command Sgt. Maj. Jerimiah Gan, the U.S. Army Cadet Command and Fort Knox Command Sgt. Maj. “We must change our actions at the point of contact if we truly want change. It’s the right thing to do.”

Prevention is a critical component to the Army’s Sexual Harassment/Assault Response and Prevention program. These troopers’ actions also demonstrated their moral courage and is an example for all others to follow.

For more information on the Army SHARP program, visit https://www.armyresilience.army.mil/sharp/

The U.S. Army Cadet Command and Fort Knox command team present Sgt. Matthews and Pfc. Kuhn with awards for their actions  Jul. 20. Both troopers are assigned to 3rd Squadron, 3d Cavalry Regiment.

 

 

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Lt. Gen. Douglas Gabram (center), commanding general, U.S. Army Installation Management Command, as well as the command team of U.S. Army Garrison – Fort Hood, Command Sgt. Maj. Matthew Ladd (far left) and Col. Chad R. Foster (far right), poses with seven members of the garrison team following a coin presentation ceremony at Fort Hood, Texas, July 20. The seven honorees are: Maj. Gabriela Thompson; Capt. Jordan Lovin; Sgt. 1st Class Jose Rodriguez; Sgt. Tranasha Brinson; Staff Sgt. Rosa Pacheco; Spc. Trevor Benjamin; and Spc. Kyleigh Mellott. (U.S. Army photo by Mark Scovell, Fort Hood Visual Information)

By Dave Larsen, Fort Hood Public Affairs

FORT HOOD, Texas — Installation Management Command Commanding General Lt. Gen. Douglas Gabram recognized the efforts of a company command team, military police investigators and the public affairs practitioners who aided in the safe return of a missing Soldier last month during a short ceremony in the III Corps and Fort Hood Headquarters here July 20.

The general gave coins to seven individuals who he said represented a much larger effort involving dozens of people to bring what could have been a tragic situation to a positive outcome.

“Nobody ever talks about the saves,” the general told the group. “We don’t get accolades for that because it’s our job. We take care of each other. That’s what we do. That’s one thing special about the Army.”

Gabram gave coins to the Soldier’s command team: Sgt. Tranasha Brinson, first-line supervisor; Sgt. 1st Class Jose Rodriguez, acting first sergeant; and Capt. Jordan Lovin, commander, Headquarters Company, U.S. Army Garrison – Fort Hood.

Brinson was the first to notice the Soldier’s absence and was the first to execute steps to locate the Soldier and establish coordination and communication with area hospitals, clinics and law enforcement. She was also the first to make contact with the Soldier, once found.

“Once she figured out the Soldier was missing,” Lovin said, “she came into my office and voiced her concern as this was out of character. She was the one to get me linked with the (Soldier’s) family and she started to work the friendship network.”

The friendship network Lovin mentioned is part of the “Golden Triangle,” the relationship created between a Soldier’s leader, friends and family members.

“Those three entities help us reach out,” Lovin said, “(and) getting all three involved lets the Soldier know that there is a network supporting them.”

“It’s leaning on each other,” Gabram stressed, “and knowing you can call someone. It’s important.”

Lovin and Rodriguez were instrumental in reaching out to the Soldier’s family, as well as area agencies to ensure the Soldier’s safe return to the installation.

In addition to the Soldier’s chain-of-command, the general gave coins to three military police investigators from the Fort Hood Directorate of Emergency Services: Staff Sgt. Rosa Pacheco; Spc. Trevor Benjamin; and Spc. Kyleigh Mellott. The team of investigators followed up on multiple leads, which contributed to the successful location of the Soldier.

Maj. Gabriela Thompson, then the III Corps deputy public affairs officer, also received a coin from the general for the public affairs timely dissemination of information regarding the Soldier’s status, and soliciting the public’s assistance in locating the Soldier early on in the process.

“It takes a village,” Gabram told the seven awardees. “When we say, ‘People First,’ … actions speak louder than words. This is a great example (of those actions). The example you set is what others should follow.”

More photos from the ceremony are available here.

 

By Brandy Cruz
Fort Hood Public Affairs

FORT HOOD, Texas — Maj. Gen. John Richardson stepped onto the historic yellow 1st Cavalry Division patch on Cooper Field July 21, following the footsteps of First Team leaders from throughout the division’s 100 years, including those of his grandfather, who commanded in the division.

“If he was still with us today, he would tell us unequivocally that the highlight and greatest honor of his 28-year career was that he rode with the First Team. Yesterday, I took one of his patches that he wore in Korea and had them sewn onto my Army green service uniform,” Richardson told the audience. “And today, on my left sleeve, is one of his patches from occupied Japan. I draw strength and determination from those who came before us. We must draw strength and inspiration from our history from our veterans and from our legacy. That’s what it means to live the legend in the 1st Cavalry Division.”

Richardson officially assumed command of the 1st Cavalry Division, after a formal passing of the division colors from Lt. Gen. Pat White, III Corps and Fort Hood commander, who officially charged him with the responsibility of the America’s First Team and its 20,000 Soldiers. “General Richardson, I’ve got great trust and confidence in you. You know you’ve inherited a high-performing team and I know you’re going to take it even higher,” White told Richardson during the ceremony. “Your energy, your experience and your general love for Soldiers will continue to bring out the best in the First Team.”

When he came to Fort Hood in September 2020 as the deputy commander of III Corps, Richardson became synonymous with Operation Phantom Action, a forerunner to the “People First” initiative meant to improve readiness by focusing on building cohesive teams. During his speech, the new First Team commander echoed his statements about building teams and leaders leading by example.

“Wars may be fought with weapons, but they are won by people. People who make up teams that work hard together, who play hard together and who will fight hard together. Teams that build mutual trust so that everybody on the team is ready to accomplish the mission,” Richardson said. “Leaders who lead from the front, leaders who lead by personal example, who know, enforce and live the standards of the Army, the value of our profession, and who build inclusive teams.”

When Richardson rolled out Operation Phantom Action last fall, it included a five-day stand-up focused on team building at every echelon of leadership. Training calendars were cleared to provide the time for leaders to properly counsel, care for and learn more about their Soldiers. The top three priorities of the initiative were leaders getting to know their Soldiers, certifying leaders, and leaders holding leaders accountable when standards are not met.

He set the ball in motion right away, by first meeting with brigade commanders and sergeants major, then with the Soldiers across the installation. In September, Richardson said he met with leaders first because, for change to take place, it would take leaders being a positive role model for junior officers and noncommissioned officers by leading by example. Following Wednesday’s assumption of command, Richardson said one of the first things he will be doing as the First Team commander is going out into the units.

“I am going to get out and talk to the Soldiers and leaders of the units. The essence of leadership is presence. I will talk and listen to the Soldiers,” he said. “The bottom-up feedback from the Soldiers is what I want to get so we can take it to the next level.”

Richardson said he plans to earn the trust of his Soldiers and their families, through his actions, his genuine care and his compassion. He then charged the Soldiers in formation with the same expectation.

“My expectation is that each of you do the same for each other and together we will build a cohesive team of teams, led by adaptive leaders,” Richardson told the formation. “It is with the utmost humility that I share with you today that I am honored to join your ranks and proud to ride with the First Team.”

As he begins his new command, he said he will not forget the veterans who rode with the First Team throughout its storied history – veterans who wore the patch proudly and honorably. Richardson said he is overwhelmed and humbled to be the new 1st Cav. Div. commander. “The pride of wearing my grandfather’s patch that he wore when he was in the division and have the opportunity to walk in his footsteps,” Richardson said following the ceremony, “and the footsteps of all the great Soldiers, who have served in this division for the last 100 years, is overwhelming.”

The division’s previous commander, Maj. Gen. Jeffrey Broadwater, has been reassigned as the deputy commanding general of V Corps at Fort Knox, Kentucky.

In a hand-written farewell note to the division, Broadwater thanked each of the troopers and family members for their “support and dedication in making the 1st Cavalry Division the most cohesive and lethal Division in the Army.”

PHOTO UPDATE: Here’s two photos from today’s ceremony.

Maj. Gen. Steven Gilland, III Corps deputy commander of maneuver, speaks in front of III Corps Headquarters, July 22 during a Phantom Honor ceremony. (U.S. Army photo by Brandy Cruz, Fort Hood Public Affairs)
3709 – Lt. Gen. Pat White, III Corps and Fort Hood commander, stands beside Maj. Gen. Steven Gilland, the new III Corps deputy commander of maneuver, during a Phantom Honors ceremony welcoming Gilland to Fort Hood, July 22, at III Corps Headquarters. (U.S. Army photo by Brandy Cruz, Fort Hood Public Affairs)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FACEBOOK LIVE: You can watch the complete ceremony at facebook.com/IIICorps.

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FORT HOOD, Texas – The III Corps commander Lt. Gen. Pat White will welcome the new III Corps Deputy Commanding General for Maneuver Maj. Gen. Steven Gilland at 4:30 p.m. July 22 in a Phantom Honors Ceremony here.

Gilland’s previous assignment was as the 2nd Infantry Division commander in the Republic of Korea. He previously served at Fort Hood as the Chief of Staff for 1st Cavalry Division (May 2014-February 2015) and commander of 1st Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division (July 2012 – April 2014).

He has served multiple deployments to Afghanistan, Africa and Iraq.

Media who wish to cover this ceremony should register here. On July 22, media should meet public affairs representatives in the south side parking lot of the Marvin Leath Visitors center at 3:45 p.m.

FORT HOOD, Texas– “Operation People First” is an initiative focused on building cohesive teams. These weekly highlights from across 3d Cavalry Regiment showcase Troopers across the regiment, quality of life programs and community relations. Operation People First is about building lethal teams by getting to know Soldiers, certifying leaders; and when necessary, leaders holding leaders accountable.

Media are welcome to report on these stories and share the imagery courtesy of the U.S. Army.

The following highlights from around the Regiment include:

  • Trooper recognized for quick action and intervention (Fort Hood, Texas)
  • Back to school supply drive for a local non-profit (Fort Hood, Texas)
  • Troopers recognized for their volunteerism (Fort Hood, Texas)
  • Troopers prevent sex crime (Fort Hood, Texas)

For more information related to the stories in this release, contact the 3d Cavalry Regiment Public Affairs office at gabriela.s.thompson2.mil@mail.mil.


Staff Sgt. Gabriella Lozano from Headhunter Troop, 4th Squadron was recognized as the 3d Cavalry Regiment Trooper of the Week. Staff. Sgt. Lozano quickly came to the aid of her trooper’s family, sacrificing her time to ensure their safety. Staff. Sgt. Lozano coordinated with agencies across Fort Hood to help the family and prevent a crisis.

(Source: Facebook)

https://www.facebook.com/3dUSCAV/posts/10159428353621450

 


Field Artillery Squadron Troopers recently organized a school supply drive and delivered the donated supplies to Austin Angels Nonprofit. The school supplies will support foster children in the Greater Central Texas area when they go back to school in August.

(Source: Facebook)

https://www.facebook.com/FAS3dCR/posts/4046319775421819

 

 


Troopers from Brimstone Battery, Field Artillery Squadron were recognized for their partnership with the Harker Heights Vision 21 class. The 37 Troopers volunteered at Habitat for Humanity, Garden of Hope and Oak Creek Academy
(Source: Facebook)

Troopers from 3d Squadron were recognized for their heroic actions intervening and preventing a sex crime from occurring while supporting the Cadet Summer Training mission at Fort Knox, Ky. The command team of U.S. Army Cadet Command and Fort Knox presented both Troopers with an Army Commendation Medal for their actions.

(Source: Facebook)
A 4th Infantry Division computer operator working alongside her United Kingdom and Canadian counterparts develops operational plans for the division using Command Post Computing Environment (CPCE) software while participating in the Command Post Computing Environment (CPCE) Operational Assessment (OA) as part of the larger Joint Warfighting Assessment 21 (JWA21) at Fort Carson, Colorado. (Photo by Mr. Lawrence Boyd, U.S. Army Operational Test Command Visual Information Specialist)

By Mr. Rick Michael, Mission Command Test Directorate, U.S. Army Operational Test Command

FORT CARSON, Colorado – Ivy Division Solders teamed up with Unified Action Partners (UAP) to test the newest version of Command Post Computing Environment (CPCE) during a Joint Warfighting Assessment (JWA) here recently.

The partner nations were United Kingdom, Australia, and Canada.

The exercise spanned multiple bases in the U.S along with the select units within U.S. Pacific Command (PACOM).

Exercise control came from the Pacific Warfighting Center in Honolulu, Hawaii as part of a PACOM Joint Readiness Exercise (JRE).

“Leveraging JWA21 as the venue for our operational assessment provided the test team the ability to collect a tremendous amount of manual and digital data,” said Maj. Mitch Monette, CPCE Test Officer, with the Fort Hood, Texas-based Mission Command Test Directorate, U.S. Army Operational Test Command.

“This was the ideal environment for capturing all test objectives defined in the operational test plan,” he said.

CPCE is the primary Computing Environment (CE) in the software infrastructure framework within the Army’s Common Operating Environment (COE) initiative in its Network Cross Functional Team, using a common interface, data and services.

This operational assessment of Mission Command software gave the Army the opportunity to demonstrate the current and future capabilities of tactical, operational, and strategic mission planning, according to Monette.

He explained how operational testing determines the operational effectiveness, suitability and survivability of systems.

“This software system is no different,” said Monette. “It was subjected to the weather, terrain, and the daily regimen of a Division Headquarters in an effort to replicate the actual operational environment where it will be used.”

He explained how the 4th ID’s system usage put CPCE through its paces.

During the final 72-hour period, there were an average of 94 active CPCE users across the six instrumented Tactical Server Infrastructure (TSI) servers.

Monette said the test got after the data needed.

“This notable level of user participation exceeded all stakeholder expectations for the testing event,” Monette said. “The team was able to collect over 100 workstation recordings to help assess the wide-spread user activity.”

Of course, operational testers modified daily operations to cope with the COVID-19 pandemic.

The Fort Carson exercise centered in and around the post’s Mission Training Complex (MTC) where four Nation’s Service members operated in close proximity.

“Specific mitigation procedures were implemented to reduce the possibility of spreading the virus from one force to another,” Monette said. “Coalition forces required their Soldier members to wear masks within the confines of the MTC to reduce the risk of possible exposure.”

“We were able to collect manual and instrumented data on CPCE in a Corps-level exercise with the Army’s Coalition Partners, providing an operationally realistic multi-domain operations (MDO) environment for testing and training,” said Ms. Madeline Wright, Deputy Director MCTD.

“OTC’s testers received feedback from 4th ID that will help our Army Leaders shape future increments of CPCE,” she added.

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About the U.S. Army Operational Test Command:

OTC taps the Total Army when testing Army, joint, and multi-service warfighting systems in realistic operational environments, using typical Soldiers to determine whether the systems are effective, suitable, and survivable. OTC is required by public law to test major systems before they are fielded to its ultimate customer — the American Soldier.

OTC’s Mission Command Test Directorate tests systems for a net-centric environment that will process and transmit voice, data, messaging and video information through networks at the tactical, operational, strategic and sustaining base levels.

By Cpt. Elizabeth Toenyes, III Corps Public Affairs

General Michael X. Garrett, the Commander of United States Army Forces Command, and General Paul E. Funk II, the Commanding General of the United States Army Training and Doctrine Command toured Fort Hood, Texas, July 15 and 16.

 

Funk and Garrett visited Fort Hood to get updates on People First Initiatives, meet with soldiers and leaders, and presented safety awards.

 

Funk conducted an hour-long listening session with 15 females from combat arms, met with Waco Recruiting Company, hosted a Stable Call, did physical fitness with Soldiers of 1st Cavalry Division, and joined the 1st Cavalry patch and farewell ceremony also attended by Brigadier General Brett Silva and Colonel Steven Carpenter.

 

Funk held a closed-door listening session with female Soldiers in combat arms from several Fort Hood brigades and battalions. The sensing session was to hear experiences from female soldiers who serve as Infantry, Armor, and Artillery.

 

Following the morning’s listening sessions,  Funk was briefed by Brig.  David W. Gardner, commander, U.S. Army Operational Test Command (OTC).  Gardner explained how the relationship between OTC and TRADOC can help conduct independent operational testing to inform acquisition and fielding decisions for Army and select multi-service Warfighting systems.

 

Staff Sgt. Steven Delafuente and Quanesha Barnett, Recruiter, U.S. Army Waco Recruiting Company, were awarded coins on behalf of the U.S. Army’s Training and Doctrine Command (TRADOC).  Funk established the recognition as a way to reward extraordinary contributions of individuals who take pride in being a recruiter, someone who brings soldiers into the ranks of Active Duty, National Guard, and Reserve Components.

 

On July 16,  Funk started his day doing physical fitness with Soldiers and attended the 1st Cavalry Division Patch and Farewell Ceremony with  Garrett.

 

Garrett presented the US Army FORSCOM Fiscal Year 2020 Safety Award to 3-351st Aviation Regiment, 166th Aviation Brigade, Division West, visit 278th Armored Cavalry Regiment during a training exercise, do physical fitness with Soldiers of 20th Engineer Battalion, 36th Engineer Brigade, hosted the 1st Cavalry patch and farewell ceremony, received a People First update from 3rd Cavalry Regiment, and meet with leaders from the Sexual Harassment/Assault and Response Program (SHARP) Academy.

 

Garrett started his day by presenting the US Army FORSCOM Fiscal Year 2020 Safety Award to the 3-351 AVN Regiment “Sentinels”, 166th Aviation Brigade, Division West.

 

Following the award presentation,  Garrett visited the 278th Armored Cavalry Regiment during a training exercise. He took a UH60 and visited several TOCs and unit locations in the field.

 

Later in the day,  Garrett visited the 3rd Cavalry Regiment for an update brief on their People First initiatives.

 

He ended his day by meeting with leaders from the SHARP Academy for an update on changes and progress made with the SHARP program on Fort Hood.

 

DVIDS Links:

https://www.dvidshub.net/image/6736297/general-paul-e-funk-ii-recognizes-waco-recruiting-company

 

https://www.dvidshub.net/image/6734823/3-351st-aviation-regiment-leads-way-aviation-safety-excellence

 

https://www.dvidshub.net/image/6736524/gen-michael-garrett-visits-fort-hood

 

https://www.dvidshub.net/image/6736421/1cd-farewell-and-patch-ceremony-bg-brett-sylvia-and-col-steven-carpenter

 

U.S. Army Gen. Michael X. Garrett, commanding general of the U.S. Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) and Command Sergeant Major Todd Sims, Command Sergeant Major of FORSCOM, conducted physical training with the Soldiers of 1st Platoon, 510th Clearance Company, 20th Engineer Battalion, 36th Engineer Brigade. Following the physical training session, Command Sergeant Major Sims and Gen. Garrett spoke with Soldiers on topics such as leadership and Operation People First initiatives.
U.S. Army Gen. Michael X. Garrett, commanding general of the U.S. Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) and Command Sergeant Major Todd Sims, Command Sergeant Major of FORSCOM, conducted physical training with the Soldiers of 1st Platoon, 510th Clearance Company, 20th Engineer Battalion, 36th Engineer Brigade. Following the physical training session, Command Sergeant Major Sims and Gen. Garrett spoke with Soldiers on topics such as leadership and Operation People First initiatives.
U.S. Army Gen. Michael X. Garrett, commanding general of the U.S. Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) and Command Sergeant Major Todd Sims, Command Sergeant Major of FORSCOM, conducted physical training with the Soldiers of 1st Platoon, 510th Clearance Company, 20th Engineer Battalion, 36th Engineer Brigade. Following the physical training session, Command Sergeant Major Sims and Gen. Garrett spoke with Soldiers on topics such as leadership and Operation People First initiatives.
U.S. Army Gen. Michael X. Garrett, commanding general of the U.S. Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) and Command Sergeant Major Todd Sims, Command Sergeant Major of FORSCOM, conducted physical training with the Soldiers of 1st Platoon, 510th Clearance Company, 20th Engineer Battalion, 36th Engineer Brigade. Following the physical training session, Command Sergeant Major Sims and Gen. Garrett spoke with Soldiers on topics such as leadership and Operation People First initiatives.
U.S. Army Gen. Michael X. Garrett, commanding general of the U.S. Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) and Command Sergeant Major Todd Sims, Command Sergeant Major of FORSCOM, conducted physical training with the Soldiers of 1st Platoon, 510th Clearance Company, 20th Engineer Battalion, 36th Engineer Brigade. Following the physical training session, Command Sergeant Major Sims and Gen. Garrett spoke with Soldiers on topics such as leadership and Operation People First initiatives.
U.S. Army Gen. Michael X. Garrett, commanding general of the U.S. Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) and Command Sergeant Major Todd Sims, Command Sergeant Major of FORSCOM, conducted physical training with the Soldiers of 1st Platoon, 510th Clearance Company, 20th Engineer Battalion, 36th Engineer Brigade. Following the physical training session, Command Sergeant Major Sims and Gen. Garrett spoke with Soldiers on topics such as leadership and Operation People First initiatives.
U.S. Army Gen. Michael X. Garrett, commanding general of the U.S. Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) and Command Sergeant Major Todd Sims, Command Sergeant Major of FORSCOM, conducted physical training with the Soldiers of 1st Platoon, 510th Clearance Company, 20th Engineer Battalion, 36th Engineer Brigade. Following the physical training session, Command Sergeant Major Sims and Gen. Garrett spoke with Soldiers on topics such as leadership and Operation People First initiatives.
U.S. Army Gen. Michael X. Garrett, commanding general of the U.S. Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) and Command Sergeant Major Todd Sims, Command Sergeant Major of FORSCOM, conducted physical training with the Soldiers of 1st Platoon, 510th Clearance Company, 20th Engineer Battalion, 36th Engineer Brigade. Following the physical training session, Command Sergeant Major Sims and Gen. Garrett spoke with Soldiers on topics such as leadership and Operation People First initiatives.
U.S. Army Gen. Michael X. Garrett, commanding general of the U.S. Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) and Command Sergeant Major Todd Sims, Command Sergeant Major of FORSCOM, conducted physical training with the Soldiers of 1st Platoon, 510th Clearance Company, 20th Engineer Battalion, 36th Engineer Brigade. Following the physical training session, Command Sergeant Major Sims and Gen. Garrett spoke with Soldiers on topics such as leadership and Operation People First initiatives.
U.S. Army Gen. Michael X. Garrett, commanding general of the U.S. Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) and Command Sergeant Major Todd Sims, Command Sergeant Major of FORSCOM, conducted physical training with the Soldiers of 1st Platoon, 510th Clearance Company, 20th Engineer Battalion, 36th Engineer Brigade. Following the physical training session, Command Sergeant Major Sims and Gen. Garrett spoke with soldiers on topics such as leadership and Operation People First initiatives.

 

U.S. Army Forces Command Commanding General, Gen. Michael X. Garrett applauds Col. Steven Carpenter, 1st Cav. Div. deputy commanding officer-support, after he donned the “CAV Hat” and division patch during his welcome “Patch” ceremony on Cooper Field, Fort Hood, TX, July 16, 2021. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. 1st Class Ashleigh E. Martinez)
U.S. Army Forces Command Commanding General, Gen. Michael X. Garrett delivers remarks during Brig. Gen. Brett Sylvia, 1st Cavalry Division deputy commanding general-maneuver’s, farewell ceremony and Col. Steven Carpenter, 1st Cavalry Division deputy commanding officer-support’s, welcome “patch” ceremony on Cooper Field, Fort Hood, TX, July 16, 2021. “I want to tell you how much the First Team means to our Nation’s defense, our military’s readiness and to the Soldiers, civilians, Families, veterans and citizens who believe in the 1st Cav’s Courageous, Audacious, and Victorious Soldiers,” Garrett said. “You put your people first; ensure that they are ready to fight and win our Nation’s wars and modernize the force for the future. I know the 1st Cav remains in good hands.” (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. 1st Class Ashleigh E. Martinez)
Brig. Gen. Brett Sylvia delivers his last remarks as the 1st Cavalry Division Deputy Commanding General-Maneuver during his farewell ceremony on Cooper Field, Fort Hood, TX, July 16, 2021. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. 1st Class Ashleigh E. Martinez)
U.S. Army Forces Command Commanding General, Gen. Michael X. Garrett and Command Sgt. Maj. Ryan McLane, 1st Cavalry Division acting command sergeant major don the traditional “CAV Hat” and the division patch onto Col. Steven Carpenter, 1st Cav. Div. deputy commanding officer-support during his welcome “Patch” ceremony on Cooper Field, Fort Hood, TX, July 16, 2021. (U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Carolyn Hart)
Brig. Gen. Brett Sylvia delivers his last remarks as the 1st Cavalry Division Deputy Commanding General-Maneuver during his farewell ceremony on Cooper Field, Fort Hood, TX, July 16, 2021. “It’s hard for me to believe that this day is here,” Sylvia said. “It has been a surprising, incredible, humbling, exhausting, enriching and all-around wonderful journey … so one last time, I will end with the words I love to hear and love to say: We are the CAV, we are the First Team – We are the CAV.” (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. 1st Class Ashleigh E. Martinez)

 

Gen. Michael Garrett, commanding general, United States Army Forces Command, greets key leader personnel from III Corps and Fort Hood Sexual Harassment Assault Response Prevention program (SHARP) at Fort Hood, Texas, July 16, 2021. The Army’s SHARP program is currently in redevelopment in support of the expedited transfer policy that provides streamlined and necessary support to Soldiers and adult dependents who are victims of sexual assault. (U.S. Army photo by Gen. Michael Garrett, commanding general, United States Army Forces Command, greets key leader personnel from III Corps and Fort Hood Sexual Harassment Assault Response Prevention program (SHARP) at Fort Hood, Texas, July 16, 2021. The Army’s SHARP program is currently in redevelopment in support of the expedited transfer policy that provides streamlined and necessary support to Soldiers and adult dependents who are victims of sexual assault. (U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Desmond Cassell)
Gen. Michael Garrett, commanding general, United States Army Forces Command, greets key leader personnel from III Corps and Fort Hood Sexual Harassment Assault Response Prevention program (SHARP) at Fort Hood, Texas, July 16, 2021. The Army’s SHARP program is currently in redevelopment in support of the expedited transfer policy that provides streamlined and necessary support to Soldiers and adult dependents who are victims of sexual assault. (U.S. Army photo by Gen. Michael Garrett, commanding general, United States Army Forces Command, greets key leader personnel from III Corps and Fort Hood Sexual Harassment Assault Response Prevention program (SHARP) at Fort Hood, Texas, July 16, 2021. The Army’s SHARP program is currently in redevelopment in support of the expedited transfer policy that provides streamlined and necessary support to Soldiers and adult dependents who are victims of sexual assault. (U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Desmond Cassell)

 

The Commanding General of U.S. Army Forces Command (FORSCOM), General Michael Garrett, visited with Brigade and Battalion leadership from across the 1st Cavalry Division Team today during his visit to Fort Hood.
The Commanding General of U.S. Army Forces Command (FORSCOM), General Michael Garrett, visited with Brigade and Battalion leadership from across the 1st Cavalry Division Team today during his visit to Fort Hood.
The Commanding General of U.S. Army Forces Command (FORSCOM), General Michael Garrett, visited with Brigade and Battalion leadership from across the 1st Cavalry Division Team today during his visit to Fort Hood.
3rd Battalion, 351st Aviation Regiment, 166th Aviation Brigade, Division West – First Army, is awarded the FORSCOM Fiscal Year 2020 Safety Award, in recognition of the most effective overall battalion safety program within FORSCOM on July 15, 2001. During this period, 3-351st Aviation Regiment participated in four mobilizations, resulting in more than 1,400 aviation Soldiers trained with over 3,000 hours flown by over 80 different aircraft. This was accomplished with zero aviation accidents, zero Class A, B, and C accidents, and 3-351st Aviation Regiment scored in the top 5% of all units surveyed by the Army Readiness Assessment Program. (U.S. Army photo by Capt. Steven L. Wesolowski)
The Commanding General of U.S. Army Forces Command (FORSCOM), General Michael Garrett, visited with Brigade and Battalion leadership from across the 1st Cavalry Division Team today during his visit to Fort Hood.
U.S. Army Gen. Michael X. Garrett, commanding general of U.S. Army Forces Command (left), presents the FORSCOM Fiscal Year 2020 Safety Award to Maj. Douglas T. Lindsay Douglas, Executive Officer of 3rd Battalion, 351st Aviation Regiment, 166th Aviation Brigade, Division West – First Army, during an awards ceremony held at First Army Division West headquarters in Fort Hood, TX, July 15, 2021. (U.S Army photo by Staff Sgt. Erick Yates)
U.S. Army Forces Command leadership visits and awards the US Army FORSCOM Fiscal Year 2020 Safety Award to 3-351st Aviation Regiment, 166th Aviation Brigade, Division West – First Army, during an awards ceremony held at Division West headquarters in Fort Hood, Texas, July 15, 2021.
Left to right: Command Sgt. Maj. Todd W. Sims, Command Sergeant Major of U.S. Army Forces Command (FORSCOM), Gen. Michael X. Garrett, commanding general of FORSCOM, Maj. Douglass T. Lindsay Douglas, Executive Officer of 3rd Battalion, 351st Aviation Regiment, 166th Aviation Brigade, Division West – First Army, and Chief Warrant Officer 3 Brian M. Lazzara, UH-60 pilot and regiment safety officer for 3rd Battalion, 351st Aviation Regiment, 166th Aviation Brigade, Division West – First Army. (U.S Army photo by Staff Sgt. Erick Yates)
The Commanding General of U.S. Army Forces Command (FORSCOM), General Michael Garrett, visited with Brigade and Battalion leadership from across the 1st Cavalry Division Team today during his visit to Fort Hood.
Maj. Douglass T. Lindsay Douglas, Executive Officer of 3rd Battalion, 351st Aviation Regiment, 166th Aviation Brigade, Division West – First Army (center), speaks on behalf of 3rd Battalion and its highest standards in aviation safety set and achieved by their Soldiers and Aviators during an awards ceremony held at Division West headquarters in Fort Hood, TX, July 15, 2001. (U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Erick Yates)
Staff Sgt. Steven Delafuente and Quanesha Barnett, Recruiter, U.S. Army Waco Recruiting Company, are awarded coins on behalf of the U.S. Army’s Training and Doctrine Command (TRADOC) at Fort Hood, Texas July 15, 2021. Gen. Paul E. Funk II, TRADOC commander, established the recognition as a way to reward extraordinary contributions of individuals who take pride in being a recruiter, someone who brings soldiers into the ranks of Active Duty, National Guard, and Reserve Components. (U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Daniel Herman)
Staff Sgt. Steven Delafuente and Quanesha Barnett, Recruiter, U.S. Army Waco Recruiting Company, are awarded coins on behalf of the U.S. Army’s Training and Doctrine Command (TRADOC) at Fort Hood, Texas July 15, 2021. Gen. Paul E. Funk II, TRADOC commander, established the recognition as a way to reward extraordinary contributions of individuals who take pride in being a recruiter, someone who brings soldiers into the ranks of Active Duty, National Guard, and Reserve Components. (U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Daniel Herman)
Brig. Gen. David W. Gardner, commander, U.S. Army Operational Test Command (OTC) briefs Gen. Paul E. Funk II, commanding general, U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command (TRADOC) at Fort Hood, Texas July 15 2021. Gardner explained how the relationship between OTC and TRADOC can help conduct independent operational testing to inform acquisition and fielding decisions for Army and select multi-service Warfighting systems. (U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Daniel Herman)
Staff Sgt. Steven Delafuente and Quanesha Barnett, Recruiter, U.S. Army Waco Recruiting Company, are awarded coins on behalf of the U.S. Army’s Training and Doctrine Command (TRADOC) at Fort Hood, Texas July 15, 2021. Gen. Paul E. Funk II, TRADOC commander, established the recognition as a way to reward extraordinary contributions of individuals who take pride in being a recruiter, someone who brings soldiers into the ranks of Active Duty, National Guard, and Reserve Components. (U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Daniel Herman)
Staff Sgt. Steven Delafuente and Quanesha Barnett, Recruiter, U.S. Army Waco Recruiting Company, are awarded coins on behalf of the U.S. Army’s Training and Doctrine Command (TRADOC) at Fort Hood, Texas July 15, 2021. Gen. Paul E. Funk II, TRADOC commander, established the recognition as a way to reward extraordinary contributions of individuals who take pride in being a recruiter, someone who brings soldiers into the ranks of Active Duty, National Guard, and Reserve Components. (U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Daniel Herman)
Staff Sgt. Steven Delafuente and Quanesha Barnett, Recruiter, U.S. Army Waco Recruiting Company, are awarded coins on behalf of the U.S. Army’s Training and Doctrine Command (TRADOC) at Fort Hood, Texas July 15, 2021. Gen. Paul E. Funk II, TRADOC commander, established the recognition as a way to reward extraordinary contributions of individuals who take pride in being a recruiter, someone who brings soldiers into the ranks of Active Duty, National Guard, and Reserve Components. (U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Daniel Herman)
Staff Sgt. Steven Delafuente and Quanesha Barnett, Recruiter, U.S. Army Waco Recruiting Company, are awarded coins on behalf of the U.S. Army’s Training and Doctrine Command (TRADOC) at Fort Hood, Texas July 15, 2021. Gen. Paul E. Funk II, TRADOC commander, established the recognition as a way to reward extraordinary contributions of individuals who take pride in being a recruiter, someone who brings soldiers into the ranks of Active Duty, National Guard, and Reserve Components. (U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Daniel Herman)
Gen. Paul E. Funk II, commanding general, U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command, greets Col. Clint Tracy, commander, G35 Futures Operations, at III Corps Headquarters at Fort Hood, Texas, July 15, 2021. (U.S. Army Photo by Staff Sgt. Daniel Herman)
Gen. Paul E. Funk II, commanding general, U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command, greets Col. Clint Tracy, commander, G35 Futures Operations, at III Corps Headquarters at Fort Hood, Texas, July 15, 2021. (U.S. Army Photo by Staff Sgt. Daniel Herman)
Gen. Paul E. Funk II, commanding general, U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command holds a sensing session with female combat arms officers and junior soldiers at Fort Hood, Texas July 15 2021. The sensing session hrld was to discuss the challenges that female soldiers faced during the integration period into combat arms. (U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Daniel Herman)
U.S. Army Forces Command leadership visits and awards the US Army FORSCOM Fiscal Year 2020 Safety Award to 3-351st Aviation Regiment, 166th Aviation Brigade, Division West – First Army, during an awards ceremony held at Division West headquarters in Fort Hood, Texas, July 15, 2021.
U.S. Army Forces Command leadership visits and awards the US Army FORSCOM Fiscal Year 2020 Safety Award to 3-351st Aviation Regiment, 166th Aviation Brigade, Division West – First Army, during an awards ceremony held at Division West headquarters in Fort Hood, Texas, July 15, 2021.