Fort Hood News Archive

FORT HOOD, Texas – Army Recruiting will host the U.S. Army Basic Training Experience from 9-11 a.m. and a career expo form 10 a.m.-2 p.m. March 3-4 on Sadowski Parade Field here for high school students across Texas.

The Basic Training Experience will include a “Drill Sergeant Experience,” “New Army Combat Fitness Test,” and “Army Obstacle Course Team Building” events to name a few.

The career expo will educate students on more than 45 Army programs and career fields. There also will be demonstrations performed by air assault repel teams, Army firefighters, military working dogs, robotics, medical teams and more.

Media who want more information or pre-interviews on this event should contact SFC Leroy Betts, Harker Heights Army recruiter at leroy.betts5.mil@mail.mil, call (972) 505-6331.

Media planning can cover the event March 3 and should register here. On March 3, media should meet public affairs representatives in the southside parking lot of the Fort Hood visitors center at 8:15 a.m.

BELTON, Texas – Following Command Sgt. Maj. Todd M. Garner’s assumption of responsibility as the 13th Expeditionary Sustainment Command’s command sergeant major on Jan. 31, the 13th Corps Support Command Association hosted a reception in Belton, Texas, on Feb.12, welcoming Garner to the greater III Corps and Fort Hood community and deepening the 13th ESC’s partnership with their neighboring cities.

“I think that this is a great opportunity to have him [Garner] out in the community and let him get a feel for the great people that we have here in central Texas,” remarked Jay Taggart, the 13th COSCOM Community Representative and Chairman.

Born and raised in Amarillo, Texas, this is the first time in his 28 years in the Army that Garner has been stationed in his home state.

“I can’t even begin to tell you how excited I am to be here,” Garner remarked. ”It is a distinct honor and privilege to serve in this outstanding organization, on this historic installation, among this fantastic military community.”

Gen. Darren L. Werner, the commanding general of the 13th ESC, is pleased to have Garner join his command team.

“The 13th ESC’s success relies on its readiness and training right down to the Soldier level, and Command Sgt. Maj. Garner’s distinguished career demonstrates that he remains the ideal leader to prepare it for the challenging missions ahead.”

“This is my 11th Change of Responsibility Ceremony,” Garner stated during the ceremony, “but this one is very special to me, as it is the first Ceremony of my career that my father has been able to attend.”

Werner also used the ceremony as an opportunity to honor Garner’s father, David Garner from Euless, Texas, by presenting him with the Vietnam Veterans Commemorative Pin for his service as an infantryman in Vietnam with the 1st Infantry Division and the 25th Infantry.

Garner’s wife, Nina, and their children Brinkley and Zane currently remain at Ramstein Airbase, Germany, until Zane graduates from high school in June, before joining Garner at Fort Hood this summer.

Command Sgt. Maj. Todd M. Garner (left) and Gen. Darren L. Werner (right), the command team for the 13th Expeditionary Sustainment Command, speak with Susan Kamas (center), the Executive Director at Workforce Solutions of Central Texas, during a 13th Corps Support Command Association hosted reception welcoming Garner on Feb. 12, to the greater III Corps and Fort Hood community, deepening the 13th ESC’s partnership with our neighboring cities. (U.S. Army photo by Capt. Tyson Friar, 13th ESC Public Affairs)

 

Command Sgt. Maj. Todd M. Garner concludes the 13th Expeditionary Sustainment Command’s assumption of responsibility ceremony as the unit’s new command sergeant major, at Fort Hood, Texas, Jan. 31. (U.S. Army photo by Capt. Tyson Friar, 13th ESC Public Affairs)

 

Jay Taggart (center), the 13th Corps Support Command Association Community Representative and Chairman, introduces Terri Covington (left), the Board Chair of the Belton Chamber of Commerce, to Command Sgt. Maj. Todd M. Garner (right), at a 13th COSCOM hosted reception welcoming Garner on February 12, to the greater III Corps and Fort Hood community, deepening the 13th ESC’s partnership with our neighboring cities. (U.S. Army photo by Capt. Tyson Friar, 13th ESC Public Affairs)

 

Sgt. Maj. Erik Detrich (right), the 13th Expeditionary Sustainment Command’s operations sergeant major, passes the unit’s colors to Gen. Darren L. Werner (left), the commanding general of the 13th ESC, during an assumption of responsibility ceremony for Command Sgt. Maj. Todd Garner (center) at Fort Hood, Texas, Jan. 31, 2020. (U.S. Army photo by Capt. Tyson Friar, 13th ESC Public Affairs)

 

Gen. Darren L. Werner (right), the commanding general of the 13th Expeditionary Sustainment Command, presented Command Sgt. Maj. Garner’s father, David Garner (left) from Euless, Texas, with the Vietnam Veterans Commemorative Pin for his service as an infantryman in Vietnam with the 1st Infantry Division and the 25th Infantry Division, during an assumption of responsibility ceremony for Garner at Fort Hood, Texas, Jan. 31. (U.S. Army photo by Capt. Tyson Friar, 13th ESC Public Affairs)

 

Command Sgt. Maj. Todd M. Garner (center), the new command sergeant major for the 13th Expeditionary Sustainment Command, receives the 13th Corps Support Command Association coin from retired Command Sgt. Maj. Daniel Elder (right) and retired Command Sgt. Maj. Terry Fountain (left), both former 13th ESC command sergeants major, during a 13th COSCOM-hosted reception welcoming Garner to the greater III Corps and Fort Hood community. U.S. Army photo by Capt. Tyson Friar, 13th ESC Public Affairs

FORT HOOD, Texas – The U.S. Army Forces Command Deputy Commanding General Lt. Gen. Lee Quintas will host a Farewell Ceremony for Maj. Gen. Kenneth L. Kamper, deputy commanding general for maneuverers, III Corps and Fort Hood, at 2:30 p.m. Feb. 21 at the III Corps flag pole.

Kamper is leaving for his next assignment as commanding general, U.S. Army Fires Center of Excellence and Fort Sill, Fort Sill, Oklahoma.

Kamper will be replaced by Maj. Gen. Scott L. Efflandt, deputy commanding general, III Corps and Fort Hood, Fort Hood, Texas, as the deputy commanding general for maneuverers, III Corps and Fort Hood, Fort Hood, Texas.

Media who wish to cover this event should register here by 4 p.m. Feb. 20. On Feb. 21, media attending should meet public affairs representatives in the south side parking lot of the visitors center at 1:45 p.m.

Cumulus clouds and plenty of sunshine is a picture-perfect day with acceptable conditions for Modular Lightweight Load-Carrying Equipment (MOLLE) 4000 rucksack risk reduction jumps as Capt. Jonathan Zerebiny, Airborne and Special Operations Test Directorate Test Parachutist, exits from the ramp of a CASA 212 airplane at an attitude of 15,000 feet followed by Staff Sgt. Corey Riser, ABNSOTD Test Parachutist and Video Flyer over Maxton Airfield, North Carolina, during MOLLE 4000 risk reduction trials. (Photo by Staff Sgt. Nicholas Birkner, Test Jumper and Video Flyer, Airborne and Special Operations Test Directorate, U.S. Army Operational Test Command)

By Mr. Mike Shelton, Airborne and Special Operations Test Directorate, U.S. Army Operational Test Command

FORT BRAGG, North Carolina — Test jumpers here are making sure Special Operations Forces military freefall (MFF) parachutists can safely use their rucksacks without compromising their missions.

Risk reduction testing begins inside vertical wind tunnels, which simulates MFF conditions.

Airborne and Special Operations Test Directorate MFF-qualified test jumpers observe the Modular Lightweight Load-Carrying Equipment (MOLLE) 4000 rucksack under canopy of current parachute systems used by Special Operators.

A host of risk reduction measures ensure potential test items are safe and effective from the intended user’s standpoint, according to Mr. Mike Tracy, chief of ABSOTD’s personnel operations.

Capt. Johnathan Zerebiny, an Airborne and Special Operations Test Directorate Test Parachutist conducts risk reduction evaluations inside the vertical wind tunnel while rigged with the RA-1 parachute and Modular Lightweight Load-Carrying Equipment (MOLLE) 4000 rucksack. A jumper must prove a stable body position, perform emergency procedures unimpeded by the test item both with and without external oxygen systems and display a reasonable range of motion that would allow them to maneuver as required. This phase of testing is critical prior to executing military free fall operations. (Photo by Mr. James Finney, Airborne and Special Operations Test Directorate, U.S. Army Operational Test Command)

“We routinely take systems developed for the 5th – 95th percentile of all Soldiers to be used in ground combat and evaluate those items for forced entry operations,” said Tracy.

Following risk reduction testing in the wind tunnels, ABNSOTD takes their verdicts and conduct MFF operations out of a CASA 212 airplane to validate the rucksack’s safety and effectiveness.

Tracy said ABNSOTD serves both Soldiers and the airborne community as a whole.

“Most of these efforts go largely unknown in the airborne community as they are accomplished prior to the start of operational testing,” explained.

With the infrastructures and vegetation of Maxton Airfield, North Carolina below, Staff Sgt. Corey Riser, Airborne and Special Operations Test Directorate Test Parachutist and Video Flyer, is not easily distracted as he observes the risk reduction jumper’s military free fall maneuvers (left turn, right turn, high lift track) while rigged with a Modular Lightweight Load-Carrying Equipment (MOLLE) 4000 rucksack. (Photo by Staff Sgt. Nicholas Birkner, Test Jumper and Video Flyer, Airborne and Special Operations Test Directorate, U.S. Army Operational Test Command)

“We strive for ‘Truth in Testing’ while never compromising safety or performance,” he added.

One ABNSOTD test jumper explained the process he takes involving risk reduction efforts.

“Virtually all test items receive ground and reliability testing prior to airborne testing,” said Sgt. 1st Class Ross Martin. “It’s the test jumper’s job to ensure that the potential test item is suitable and effective from a paratrooper’s point of view.”

ABNSOTD’s chief of airborne testing said his outfit exists to serve both Soldiers and the airborne community.

Blue skies and warm temperatures make for a great Modular Lightweight Load-Carrying Equipment (MOLLE) 4000 military free fall airborne operation as Staff Sgt. Corey Riser, an Airborne and Special Operations Test Directorate Test Parachutist and Video Flyer, captures Capt. Jonathan Zerebiny, an ABNSOTD Test Parachutist flying at 15,000 feet above ground level, executing MFF testing of the MOLLE 4000 while stabilized over Maxton Airfield, North Carolina. Riser captures flight characteristics of the MOLLE 4000 during free fall and collects data for later analysis during the risk reduction jump. (Photo by Staff Sgt. Nicholas Birkner, Test Jumper and Video Flyer, Airborne and Special Operations Test Directorate, U.S. Army Operational Test Command)

“Testing promotes and delivers a safe, and more durable piece of equipment to the Warfighter,” said Maj. Cam Jordan.

“Soldiers relish in participating in day-to day testing. It ignites their enthusiasm to rig and load a piece of equipment which will ultimately serve our future Soldiers during combat missions.”

Operational readiness is a key factor in testing airborne equipment, according to Col. Brad Mock, ABNSOTD’s director.

“Operational testing is a technique that our subject matter experts ensure the quality, performance of, as well as the operational readiness of the product tested,” he said.

“We ‘Test for the Best,’ conducting, rigorous, realistic, honest, service unique and joint testing; making sure the systems developed are effective in a Soldier’s hands and suitable for the environments in which our Soldiers in today’s Army train and fight.”

~~

About the U.S. Army Operational Test Command:

The Fort Bragg, North Carolina-based ABNSOTD plans, executes, and reports on operational tests and field experiments of Airborne and Special Operations Forces equipment, procedures, aerial delivery and air transportation systems in order to provide key operational data for the continued development and fielding of doctrine, systems or equipment to the Warfighter.

The U.S. Army Operational Test Command is based at West Fort Hood, Texas, and its mission is about ensuring that systems developed are effective in a Soldier’s hands and suitable for the environments in which Soldiers train and fight. Test units and their Soldiers provide feedback, by offering input to improve upon existing and future systems with which Soldiers will ultimately use to train and fight.

Staff Sgt. Corey Riser, an Airborne and Special Operations Test Directorate Test Parachutist and Video Flyer at Fort Bragg, North Carolina, observes Sgt. 1st Class Jacob Droski as he conducts Modular Lightweight Load-Carrying Equipment (MOLLE) 4000 rucksack risk reduction testing; completing his pull sequence over Maxton Airfield, North Carolina. (Photo by Staff Sgt. Nicholas Birkner, Test Jumper and Video Flyer, Airborne and Special Operations Test Directorate, U.S. Army Operational Test Command)

FORT HOOD, Texas – Fort Hood officials have released the name of two Soldiers who died on Feb. 1 from injuries sustained during a private vehicle accident Highway 195 in Williamson County, Texas.

Pvt. Eric Christopher Hogan, 19, whose home of record is listed as Campton, New Hampshire, entered the Army in June 2019 as a cavalry scout. He was assigned to 12th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Armored Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division, here since November 2019.

“The Thunder Battalion is deeply saddened by the sudden and tragic loss of Private Eric Hogan,” said Lt. Col. Ronald Sprang, Commander, 2-12 Cavalry Regiment, 1st Armored Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division. “We send our most heartfelt condolences to the family, friends and loved ones of Private Hogan. Our thoughts and prayers go out to them in this trying time. He was an important member of the battalion scout platoon and the battalion and his loss is deeply felt.”

Hogan’s awards and decorations include the National Defense Service Medal and Army Service Ribbon.

Pfc. Anthony Nevelle Peak Jr., 21, whose home of record is listed as Mount Dora, Florida, entered the Army in June 2017 as an ammunition specialist. He was assigned to the 9th Armored Regiment, 3rd Armored Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division, here since May 2019.

“Private First Class Anthony Peak was a valuable member of this team and his loss is felt by his friends and the Soldiers of the Saber Squadron and Greywolf Brigade. Command Sgt. Maj. Ryan McLane and I would like to express our deepest condolences to Anthony’s family and friends. Our thoughts and prayers are with them during this difficult time,” Col. Kevin Capra, 3rd Armored Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division, said.

Peak’s awards and decorations include two Army Accommodation Medals, National Defense Service Medal and Army Service Ribbon.

This accident is under investigation by Texas Department of Public Safety.

Never compromising safety or performance, the Airborne and Special Operations Test Directorate test team conducts a simulated airdrop impact test of the Forward Area Rearm and Refueling Point (FARRP) at the ABNSOTD rigging facility, Fort Bragg, North Carolina, to replicate deceleration of ground impact. The ABNSOTD test team simulated a low-velocity airdrop decent and ground impact, of the rigged FARRP load by dropping it to replicate a worst-case scenario. (Photo by Mr. Chris O’Leary, Photographer, Airborne and Special Operations Test Directorate, U.S. Army Operational Test Command)

By Mr. James Cochran and Mr. William Slaven, Airborne and Special Operations Test Directorate, U.S. Army Operational Test Command

FORT BRAGG, North Carolina — Aviation support Soldiers here recently tested an attack helicopter refueling and rearming system by air-dropping it out of U.S. Air Force cargo aircraft.

The Forward Area Rearm and Refueling Point (FARRP) allows Bragg’s Immediate Response Force the capability to extend range for the Multi-Function Aviation Task Force whenever it is called on to deploy.

Troops from Alpha Company, 122nd Aviation Support Battalion (ASB), 82nd Combat Aviation Brigade, worked with airborne testers from the Airborne and Special Operations Test Directorate (ABNSOTD) using low-velocity airdrop techniques within current cargo aerial delivery doctrine.

“The FARRP is a proven method of refueling and resupplying that permits combat aircraft to rapidly refuel and rearm simultaneously,” said Mr. William R. Slaven, a Military Test Plans Analyst with ABNSOTD. “It serves as a means for arming and refueling attack helicopters which ultimately serves our future Soldiers during combat missions.”

Far cry from a desert with lifeless activity, the Forward Area Rearm and Refueling Point (FARRP) lands on Normandy Drop Zone, Fort Bragg, North Carolina, intact as the Airborne and Special Operations Test Directorate test team prepares for derigging of the FARRP load. (Photo by Mr. Jim Finney, Photographer, Airborne and Special Operations Test Directorate, U.S. Army Operational Test Command)

According to Slaven, testing ensures rigged loads using the low velocity airdrop system are delivered to ground troops while remaining combat effective.

One 122nd ASB Soldier said he had a magnificent time involved in the test.

“Being a part of the next level in fuel operations, there are only limits if we set them,” said Sgt. Joe Smalls. “This FARRP proves it.”

“Soldiers are expected to be proficient at all parts of the aerial delivery rigging experience to include rigging of equipment and supplies for airdrop,” said Sgt. 1st Class Timothy Nephew, ABNSOTD Project Noncommissioned Officer.

The Forward Area Rearm and Refueling Point (FARRP) load rigged with seven G-11C parachutes descends over the Normandy Drop Zone, Fort Bragg, North Carolina. The Airborne and Special Operations Test Directorate test team conducted three consecutive, successful airdrops of the FARRP from U.S. Air Force C–130J cargo aircraft. The platform rotations, descent rates, and impact velocity were within acceptable parameters for all airdrops. (Photo by Photo by Mr. Jim Finney, Photographer, Airborne and Special Operations Test Directorate, U.S. Army Operational Test Command)

ABNSOTD’s chief of airborne testing said his outfit exists to serve both Soldiers and the airborne community.

“We strive in ‘Truth in Testing’ while never compromising safety or performance,” said Lt. Col. Cam Jordan.

“Testing promotes and delivers a safe, and more durable piece of equipment to the Warfighter,” Jordan continued.

“Soldiers relish in participating in day-to day testing. It ignites their enthusiasm to rig and load a piece of equipment which will ultimately serve our future Soldiers during combat missions.”

Operational readiness is a key factor in testing airborne equipment, according to Col. Brad Mock, ABNSOTD’s director.

“We ‘Test for the Best,’ conducting, rigorous, realistic, honest, service unique and joint testing, making sure the systems developed are effective in a Soldier’s hands and suitable for the environments in which our Soldiers in today’s Army train and fight,” he said.

~~

About the U.S. Army Operational Test Command:

The Fort Bragg, North Carolina-based ABNSOTD plans, executes, and reports on operational tests and field experiments of Airborne and Special Operations Forces equipment, procedures, aerial delivery and air transportation systems in order to provide key operational data for the continued development and fielding of doctrine, systems or equipment to the Warfighter.

The U.S. Army Operational Test Command is based at West Fort Hood, Texas, and its mission is about ensuring that systems developed are effective in a Soldier’s hands and suitable for the environments in which Soldiers train and fight. Test units and their Soldiers provide feedback, by offering input to improve upon existing and future systems with which Soldiers will ultimately use to train and fight.

 

Rainy weather is definitely not a show stopper for the Airborne and Special Operations Test Directorate test team and Soldiers from Alpha Company, 122nd Aviation Support Battalion (ASB), Fort Bragg, North Carolina, as they conduct an inspection and an operational functions check of the Forward Area Rearm and Refueling Point (FARRP) at the ABNSOTD rigging facility to ensure the test item performed as designed. (Photo by Mr. Jim Finney, Photographer, Airborne and Special Operations Test Directorate, U.S. Army Operational Test Command)

FORT HOOD, Texas — The 1st Cavalry Division’s Headquarters and Headquarters Battalion will load their vehicles onto rail cars Thursday at the Fort Hood Rail Operations Center as they prepare to deploy in support of DEFENDER 20, a U.S. Army Europe-led joint, multinational training exercise series scheduled for April-May in central Europe.

The battalion’s commander, Lt. Col. Tasha Lowery, will be available for interview during the effort, which will be part of the largest deployment of U.S.-based Army forces to Europe for an exercise in the last 25 years.

The First Team will participate in 3 sequential exercises during their deployment to Europe.

The first is the Warfighter Exercise, a culminating training event that validates the division’s war-fighting capabilities in a simulated, large-scale combat operations scenario.

Second is the Joint Warfighting Assessment, which is the Army Chief of Staff’s capstone event that provides the Army a venue to achieve training readiness, future force development, and interoperability with multinational partners.

The First Team will also participate in Allied Spirit XI, an event that will see the 1st Cav leading a multinational division element while conducting a live river crossing.

Media interested in attending the event should RSVP to Sgt. 1st Class Michael Garrett at michael.b.garrett16.mil@mail.mil by 5 p.m. January 29. Attending media should meet at the media parking area at the Fort Hood Welcome Center on T.J. Mills Blvd. no later than 8:00 a.m. January 30.

FORT HOOD, Texas – Make wellness your 2020 resolution by scheduling preventative health and wellness exams like hearing and vision tests and various cancer screenings.

The exams give a more specific look at a person’s health status and can better identify immediate threats to their well-being or elevated risks for chronic diseases.

Throughout the year, Army Medicine highlights specific diseases and health conditions. January kicks off with Cervical Cancer Awareness Month.

More than 13,000 women are diagnosed with cervical cancer, according to the Center for Disease control and Prevention (CDCP). It also is preventable with two screening tests: Pap test and human papillomavirus (HPV).

According to the CDC, the Pap test looks for cell changes on the cervix that might become cervical cancer if they are not treated, and the human papillomavirus (HPV) test looks for the virus that can cause these cell changes. HPV vaccines can protect women against the types of HPV that cause most cervical cancers. The most important thing you can do to help prevent cervical cancer is to get screening tests regularly starting at age 21.

The CDC also stresses that HPV is the main cause of cervical cancer and recommends the HPV vaccination for children between the ages of 11 to 12 to help prevent cervical and other kinds of cancer.

If you are 30 years old or older, you have three options: you can get a Pap test only, an HPV test only, or both an HPV and a Pap test together. If your test results are normal, you can wait three years to be tested again if you had a Pap test only, or five years to be tested again if you had an HPV test only or both an HPV test and a Pap test together.

Early cervical cancer may not cause symptoms. Advanced cervical cancer may cause abnormal vaginal bleeding or discharge. Left alone, abnormal cells may eventually progress to cancer. The good news is the cells are slow growing, so it can take a decade or longer for this to happen, according to the CDC.

Cervical cancer is highly curable when found and treated early. Be proactive about your health care. Make your appointment today.

 

 

 

For more information contact Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center Public Affairs Office

POC: Mikaela Cade, (254) 288-8005; mikaela.t.cade.civ@mail.mil Email

Web site: http://www.crdamc.amedd.army.mil.

 

FORT HOOD, Texas — The East Range Road post-access gate will be closed from Jan. 23-Feb. 11 to allow for the replacement of the failing culvert system on East Range Road, south of the gate.

For residents traveling from Gatesville, Texas, it is recommended that they travel to Fort Hood via West Range Road.

For residents traveling from eastern towns such as Leon Junction, Texas, or other eastern routes it is recommended that they travel to Fort Hood via TX-36 south to FM 439 to gates on the east side of the post.

 

Honoring Our Heroes & Restoring the Rhythm of Lives:

Caliber Collision Partners with Dallas Cowboys to Support Our Troops & First Responders

Two-Day Event at Fort Hood Highlights Heroes Day, Changing Lanes Graduation and Car Donations to Military Families

(Lewisville, Texas – January 21, 2020) – Continuing their proud, patriotic partnership, Caliber Collision and the Dallas Cowboys will launch their 2020 celebration of America’s military with a star-studded road show Jan. 23-24 at Fort Hood.

Highlighted by three-time Super Bowl champion and Air Force veteran Chad Hennings, the Dallas Cowboys cheerleaders and renowned mascot, “Rowdy,” the Fort Hood event will recruit soldiers to compete in a series of athletic skills tests akin to the NFL Combine. After the Caliber/Cowboys’ tour makes similar stops at bases in San Antonio (JBSA-Sam Houston) and Fort Worth (NAS-JRB), the competition’s preliminaries will be held March 20 at the home of the Cowboys, AT&T Stadium. This year, for the first time, Caliber and the Cowboys will also invite select First Responders to participate.

On the 4th Annual “Heroes Day” – April 4 at AT&T Stadium – 50 finalists will compete to become this year’s champion and punctuate a day-long salute to the brave men and women that protect both America’s interests abroad and local communities here at home. In addition to the competition, attendees will enjoy family festivities and have on site access to resources provided by military service non-profit partners.

“The Cowboys organization is privileged to partner with Caliber in support of our service men and women,” says Hennings, who piloted 45 missions into Iraq during the Gulf War before embarking on his successful nine-year career in the NFL. “I’m excited to watch fellow veterans, first responders and members of all of our military branches compete in actual NFL drills and support each other in a day of family fun. The impact of this event will be felt far beyond the combine.”

Further rallying the troops, the Fort Hood road show will celebrate 2020’s first graduating class of transitioning soldiers from Caliber’s Changing Lanes Academy, and will also feature Caliber – along with partner, GEICO – gifting two NABC Recycled Rides® vehicles to deserving military families. Helping soldiers transition to civilian life, Changing Lanes Academy provides graduates of its 18-week program with a $12,000 tool box and an employment offer from Caliber. Caliber Collision, through the NABC’s Recycled Rides® program, has donated nearly 500 vehicles to date. For this gifting, cars were donated by GEICO and restored by the 13 Changing Lanes Academy graduating Fort Hood soldiers, and will be presented to two Gold Star spouses.

“Caliber is inspired to serve our communities and we have a special affinity for supporting those who sacrifice their lives to protect the freedoms we value,” says Caliber CEO Steve Grimshaw. “We will continue investing in programs like Heroes Day, the Changing Lanes Academy and NABC’s Recycled Rides® because these are programs that enable us to live out our purpose of ‘restoring the rhythm of your life’ every single day.”

To launch the Caliber/Cowboys 2020 road show, the following festivities are scheduled for soldiers stationed at Fort Hood:

Thursday, January 23rd

  • 11 a.m. – 1 p.m.: Chad Hennings, Cheerleaders and Rowdy at the Sprockets Facility (on base) – Autographs, interviews and photo opportunities with some of the stars of America’s Team.

Friday, January 24th

  • 10:30 a.m.: Caliber’s Changing Lanes Academy graduation at the Phantom Warrior Center – Honorees include military service members who have completed the 18-week course to earn their Technical Certification
  • 11 a.m.: NABC’s Recycled Rides® Donations – Caliber and GEICO will be donating two vehicles, through the National Auto Body Council’s Recycled Rides® program, which repairs and donates vehicles to help military members transition back to civilian life.
  • 12:00 p.m. – 1:30 p.m.: Combine Competition Sign-ups at Abrams Gym BLDG. 23001, 62nd Street – Members of the military will be encouraged to enter the NFL-like Combine competition on March 20th at AT&T Stadium.

Media Desiring to cover the events should call 254-287-0106/9993 or 254-449-5298 no later than 4 p.m. Jan. 22. On Jan. 23 a public affairs representative will meet the media at the Marvin Leath Visitors Center at 10:30 a.m. for an escort onto the installation. The gate time for the events on Jan. 24 is 10 a.m.

For more information regarding Caliber Collision’s programs and support of our country’s service men and women, please visit www.calibercollision.com.

About Caliber Collision Centers

Caliber Collision’s purpose is Restoring The Rhythm Of Your Life®, including our customers, partners, clients and the communities we serve. Caliber Collision consistently ranks among the highest customer satisfaction scores in the industry across more than 1,100 locations in 37 states. For more information about Caliber, please visit www.calibercollision.com.