Fort Hood News Archive

FORT HOOD, Texas – Soldiers with the 36th Engineer Brigade at Fort Hood underwent a new sexual assault prevention training course on March 1. The course, called S.W.A.T., which stands for Supporting Warriors Action Team, is a program created in the wake of the ongoing People First Campaign intended to train soldiers to create fundamental change in both command climate and organizational culture at all levels.

“The problem is easy, it’s the solution that’s complex,” said Lt. Col. Angie Chipman, the III Corps SHARP operations director.

“If we were down range this wouldn’t be that hard and I think that’s what’s frustrating for people. The enemy is in the wire and we have to find this person. How do we do it when they look like us, when they are one of us,” Chipman said.

“The key to S.W.A.T. is not the macro, it’s the micro,” said Chipman. “It’s about finding this garbage at the source and stopping it there.”

The three primary objectives of S.W.A.T. are to train soldiers how to recognize signs and early warnings of sexual misconduct, how to intervene in incidents of sexual misconduct and how to advocate for vulnerable servicemembers and the survivors of sexual misconduct.

The training session was divided into two parts: a classroom portion which was conducted in the morning and a hands-on portion in the afternoon.

Chipman, a native of Williamsburg, Iowa, served as the new program’s primary architect and the facilitator for the day’s events. After giving a brief introduction to the course, Chipman handed off the course to the presenters.

“The person who makes the difference is down there in the formation,” said Chipman. “It’s not me. As many speeches as I can give, I’m not the one who’s there on the range, or in the motor pools or at the companies every day.”

The first speaker of the day, Kyomi Carpenter, a victim advocate for 1st Cavalry Brigade presented a lesson on the ‘continuum of harm’ or how events of sexual harassment can escalate into incidents of sexual assault.

“Little comments and individual situations might not seem that bad,” said Carpenter.

“But little things can turn into a bad environment. Find the source and stop it there, because you can’t save everyone on your own,” she said.

Next, Capt. Karolina Przegienda, an Embedded Behavioral Healthcare provider with 3rd Cavalry Regiment on Fort Hood presented a course on bullying and toxic leadership during the morning. The Brooklyn, New York native put an emphasis on establishing a culture of safety and mindfulness in the hope that this could prevent incidents in the future.

“It’s challenging when we start from the ground up,” said Przegienda. “Like anything when you begin at the bottom it takes time, perseverance and motivation. But we need to have these Soldiers invested in themselves and their futures.”

Przegienda went on to say that if Soldiers took away only one piece of her class it was that any voice, no matter the size, can affect change.

“Be that change you want to see, be courageous, stand up for other people,” said Przegienda.

Following Przegienda, Lt. Col. Shaun Lister presented a class on the Uniform Code of Military Justice and legal recourse for violations.

“My hope is twofold,” said Lister. “I hope this class pulls back the curtain a little bit and puts a face to those in the military’s justice system and I hope to show how it all works. Army wide we’re taking steps to improve the situation. Have faith and keep working within the system.”

Training resumed at the SHARP 360 Building where soldiers worked through a number of brief scenarios. The afternoon training saw the Soldiers engaging with the office of the Inspector General, equal opportunity advisors, SHARP representatives and, finally, provided feedback to better the course for future classes.

Sgt. Joya Tardeff, a horizontal construction Noncommissioned Officer with the 62nd Engineer Battalion said that she felt the training had empowered her to help Soldiers in need and provided a wide base of knowledge to assist her in doing so. She also said she was proud of the Soldiers’ efforts throughout the training and appreciated their attentiveness.

“It’s important for them to know you don’t have to be a sergeant to make a difference.” said Tardeff. “A lot of soldiers got this conception, ‘oh I’m just a private, no one would listen to me,’ and that’s just false.”

The Thibodaux, Louisiana native went on to offer encouragement to anyone affected by incidents of misconduct.

“Please, if you’re out there you’re not alone,” said Tardeff.

“You’re not the first. I know it’s hard. There’s people you can trust. We’re out here. Your mental health is everything, find what you need to heal. We’re here to help,” said Tardeff before returning to training.

“The biggest thing I’ll take away from all this is that it’s hard for soldiers going through this,” said Spc. Travis Denny, a combat engineer with the 36th. “I’m glad I know how to handle things like this properly now and what avenues to take because when you see your battle buddy you need to know you can trust them and they’ve got your back.”

“Now that we learned a lot more about how investigations are done and what resources are available,” said Spc. Scott Cokely, a combat engineer with the 36th.“I know that we’re brave enough to stand up and actually confront the situation.”

The 36th Engineer Brigade commander Col. Clete Goetz visited the training and said that he had volunteered the young engineers in his command to be part of the pilot program. He also remarked that he had hope that the soldiers would develop the skills needed to stop sexual assault and harassment at the source.

“I have a real belief in the People First Campaign, so I’m glad I got these guys in here,” said Goetz. “They’re developing these interventional skills that will make the difference in the future.”

“It’s exciting to know that my leadership takes this seriously, that if people are in need we’ll be here to help,” said Cokely. “36 takes this seriously and I can’t wait to take this back to my formation. Stay Rugged!”

Soldiers with the 36th Engineer Brigade receive Supporting Warrior Action Team (S.W.A.T.) training at the Sexual Harassment/Assault Response and Prevention (SHARP) 360 building, at Fort Hood, Texas, March 1, 2021. The class served as the pilot to the new program, and is intended to create junior enlisted ambassadors of the SHARP program in an effort to create a healthy and people centered environment. (Army Photo by Sgt. Evan Ruchotzke)
Master Sgt. Jose Rosario Jr., III Corps senior equal opportunity advisor, conducts a class at Fort Hood’s Sexual Harassment/Assault Response and Prevention (SHARP) 360 building during Supporting Warrior Action Team (S.W.A.T.) Training, March 1, 2021. Soldiers heard from nearly a dozen speakers throughout the training and had opportunities for hands-on training in simulated scenarios. (U.S. Army Photo by Sgt. Evan Ruchotzke)
Lt. Col. Angie Chipman takes a break from S.W.A.T. training (Supporting Warrior Action Team) at the Sharp 360 building at Fort Hood, Texas, March 1, 2021. Chipman, who hails from Williamsburg, Iowa, said that she began coordinating the program Dec. 8, 2020, immediately after the release of the Fort Hood Independent Review. (U.S. Army Photo by Sgt. Evan Ruchotzke)

 

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FORT HOOD, Texas – The 3rd Security Force Assistance Brigade will be presented the 2020 Association of Old Crows and the U.S. Army’s Outstanding Unit Award here, March 4.

The award recognizes the unit’s contributions to electronic warfare (EW), cyberspace operations (CO), and information operations (IO) in the Combined Joint Operation Area-Afghanistan as they advanced the synchronization of EW/CO/IO effects for the NATO Resolute Support and United States Forces-Afghanistan Freedom’s Sentinel Missions.

The Association of Old Crows recognizes service members and units annually for their unique contributions to the AOC in support of the United States or Allied Electronic Warfare (EW), Electromagnetic Spectrum Operations (EMSO), Cyber-Electromagnetic Activity (CEMA), and Information Operations (IO). The award presentation typically occurs at the Annual AOC Symposium and Convention in Washington D.C., however, due to COVID-19 the event was cancelled.

Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center Public Affairs

FORT HOOD, Texas – Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center will resume COVID-19 vaccinations March 3 at Abrams gym for beneficiaries whose second dose was due in February. Second dose vaccinations will be administered by appointment only.

Beneficiaries who were due a second dose in February should call the central appointment line at 254-288-8888 to schedule an appointment. Walk-in slots will not be available.

Appointments will not be available at tricareonline.com.

Beneficiaries with second doses due March 1 through March 5 will be delayed.

Beneficiaries who will reach the 21-day interval for their second dose March 1 through March 5 will receive an automated call with instructions on scheduling a new appointment.

Beneficiaries should bring a valid DOD ID card to their scheduled appointment.

Abrams Gym, building 23001, is located on 62nd Street and Support Avenue. The vaccination site will be open from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday. The site is closed on weekends and Federal holidays.

CRDAMC will resume COVID-19 vaccine first dose appointments at a later date.

Please check the Darnall website at darnall.tricare.mil and social media sites for updates.

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For more information contact:

Ms. Mikaela Cade

Chief Public Affairs & Marketing

Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center

Fort Hood, TX 76544

(254) 288-8005

(254) 338-6087

mikaela.t.cade.civ@mail.mil

 

Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center Public Affairs

FORT HOOD, Texas – Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center officials announce a pause in COVID-19 vaccinations Monday, March 1 due to shipment delays.  There will be no COVID-19 vaccinations offered at Abrams gym.

Beneficiaries may also receive notification through the TRICARE appointment system, secure messaging, and automated call systems.

CRDAMC will  announce new vaccination dates and appointment availability when the next shipment arrives.

Appointments for the COVID-19 vaccine will not be available on tricareonline.com or through the central appointments line until more vaccine is received.

Please visit the CRDAMC website and Facebook for information updates.

 

For more information contact:

Ms. Mikaela Cade

Chief Public Affairs & Marketing

Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center

Fort Hood, TX 76544

(254) 288-8005

(254) 338-6087

mikaela.t.cade.civ@mail.mil

Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center Public Affairs

FORT HOOD, Texas – Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center officials announce a pause in COVID-19 vaccinations Friday, Feb. 26 due to shipment delays.  There will be no COVID-19 vaccinations offered at Abrams gym.

Beneficiaries may also receive notification through the TRICARE appointment system, secure messaging, and automated call systems.

CRDAMC will announce new vaccination dates and appointment availability when the next shipment arrives.

Appointments for the COVID-19 vaccine will not be available on tricareonline.com or through the central appointments line until more vaccine is received.

Please visit the CRDAMC website and Facebook for information updates.

 

For more information contact:

Ms. Mikaela Cade

Chief Public Affairs & Marketing

Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center

Fort Hood, TX 76544

(254) 288-8005

(254) 338-6087

mikaela.t.cade.civ@mail.mil

 

 

FORT HOOD, Texas – When last week’s severe weather conditions left families and the vulnerable in need, Soldiers from across the 61st Quartermaster Battalion, 13th Expeditionary Sustainment Command used their time and resources to care for their neighbors and each other.

When 1st Sgt. Michael Baker, the First Sergeant for the 53rd Quartermaster Company, lost power, his family moved into their travel trailer for warmth, but many in his neighborhood were not so fortunate.

“Three families on my block were not so lucky,” Baker explained. “I told my wife that we have plenty of trees on our land, so I bought a chain saw and went to cutting down trees.”

Baker not only shared the wood with these three families, but also one of his Soldiers who lived nearby. Upon hearing during an online meeting with another First Sergeant, who was out of town, that her family was also without power, Baker cut down another tree.

Baker’s wife, Xiomara, also brought meals each day to an elderly lady in their neighborhood so that she could have hot meals.

“We have always had a tight community where we live,” Baker reflects. “I have known the families in my neighborhood since 2011, and we have always looked after one another.”

Staff Sgt. Joshua Markgraf from the 418th Transportation Company, also stepped up to assist families without electricity. Since he and his wife, Liliana, still had power and water, they invited four families into their home until power was restored.

“My neighborhood in Harker Heights didn’t lose electricity or water,” stated Markgraf, “so my wife and I invited the families to stay with us to keep warm until their homes were safe.”

As food in the Markgraf home began to quickly disappear, Liliana headed to the store and spoke with the manager at the neighborhood Walmart in Harker Heights to be allowed to exceed the milk limit in order not only to provide for their house guests, but also for a few mothers with toddlers that she knew were without, and delivered it to them that evening.

Because the city garbage pickup was suspended due to the weather, Markgraf’s trash piled up quickly with his additional guests. He not only hauled his trash to the city dump, but picked up the trash of an elderly neighbor as well.

“We helped these families, because I believe they would do the same for mine,” Markgraf explained.

1st Lt. Kyle Hrncir, the Executive Officer for the 53rd Petroleum Support Company, also opened his home to three families and their total of six dogs. One of Hrncir’s guests was his company commander, Capt. Bryan Miller.

“1st Lt. Hrncir not only fed all of the families, but the entertained children,” explained Miller. “His selfless service of taking in that many people under this extraordinary situation exemplifies that Kyle takes ‘people first’ to the utmost.”

Hrncir’s house also served as the command and control node for the company as he was one of a few key leaders that hadn’t lost electricity and internet connectivity.

“1st Lt. Hrncir was also in contact with the rest of those in the company to ensure that if they lost power that ‘Hostel Hrncir’ was available to them and their families” remarked Miller. “I am truly proud to have him on my team!”

Fort Hood and the III Armored Corps are proud to provide support to the community, especially in times of need.

“This is what we do,” explains Baker. “The Army grooms us not to think about ourselves but to help those in need, our battle buddies. I saw this as nothing else but doing what has been instilled in me from my family values and the Army’s values.”

1st Sgt. Michael Baker, the First Sergeant for the 53rd Quartermaster Company, 61st Quartermaster Battalion, 13th Expeditionary Sustainment Command, cut down trees on his property during last week’s severe cold weather so that five other families without power could heat their homes, Feb. 2021.  U.S. Army photo by Sgt. 1st Class Kelvin Ringold.

by Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center Public Affairs

FORT HOOD, Texas – Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center’s vaccination site located at Abrams gym will be open for booked appointments only Feb. 25. No walk-in slots are available. Beneficiaries with booked appointments should arrive at their scheduled time to receive the COVID-19 vaccine.

Due to limited allocations, the vaccine will be distributed by appointment basis until another shipment is received.
Please stay tuned to the Darnall website at darnall.tricare.mil and social media sites for updates.

Beneficiaries with appointments should bring a valid DOD ID card to their appointment. All beneficiaries are encouraged to complete DHA form 207 before arriving at the gym, if possible.

Abrams Gym, building 23001, is located on 62nd Street and Support Avenue. The vaccination site will be open from 8 a.m. – 4 p.m. Monday – Friday. The site is closed weekends and Federal holidays.

 

By Mr. Rick Michael, Mission Command Test Directorate, U.S. Army Operational Test Command

FORT BRAGG, North Carolina – Airborne Soldiers with 1st Battalion, 504th Parachute Infantry Regiment (PIR), 82nd Airborne Division, completed almost two weeks testing the Army’s newest small leader radio (LR) packages.

“Soldiers of the 82nd Airborne Division demonstrated tactical communications at its finest during the initial operational test,” said Maj. Brian Ramirez, Leader Radio (LR) Test Officer with the Fort Hood-based U.S. Army Operational Test Command’s Mission Command Test Directorate (MCTD).

The Handheld, Manpack and Small (HMS) Form Fit/Tactical Radio variants are two-channel handhelds, used at the company and platoon levels by squad and team leaders to talk to each other and to aircraft to improve battlefield situational awareness.

Ramirez said the LR system is designed as an interoperable family of advanced software-reprogrammable, dual-channel, net-centric reliable communications radio sets.

The Generation 2 Manpack (MP) Radio is a two-channel, software defined, multi-waveform, General Purpose User (GPU) radio designed to support mounted and dismounted operations.

Explaining the two systems in non-technical, every-day terms, Ramirez said, “This initial operational test of radio capabilities gave the Army the opportunity to demonstrate the current and future of tactical communications.”

The HMS MP will be fielded primarily to Brigade Combat Team (BCT) Battalions, Companies, and Platoons.

The GEN2 MP is deployed in three configurations: a Tactical Operations Center (TOC) kit for command posts; mounted configurations integrated into the Army’s tactical and combat platforms; and a rucksack-held configuration to support Army dismounted operations.

Ramirez said operational testing of the radios are no different than an improved tank or new weapon system.

“These radio systems are subjected to weather, terrain, and the daily regimen of Light Infantrymen in an effort to replicate the actual operational environment to which they will be subjected if selected,” said Ramirez.

“Operational testing helps determine the effectiveness, suitability and survivability of operational systems Soldiers can use that works.”

The test, like many other previously routine operations, adjusted its daily operations to cope with the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

“Soldiers from the test unit and test team begin with daily COVID-19 screening and temperature checks;” Ramirez said. “This allowed the test team to identify and contain any possible transmission between specific bubbles.”

Once cleared into their specific environments, all attempts were made to maintain social distancing, between operations and test support functions, reducing interaction between test support personnel and test unit Soldiers.

“Operational Testing is about assisting the Army in providing modern software-defined radios with the latest technology for Soldiers,” said Col. Patrick Curry, director of MCTD.

“It is about making sure that the communication systems developed assist the Soldier in their mission and ensuring Soldiers are effective against all enemies in any operational environment.”

~~

About the U.S. Army Operational Test Command:

OTC taps the Total Army when testing Army, joint, and multi-service warfighting systems in realistic operational environments, using typical Soldiers to determine whether the systems are effective, suitable, and survivable. OTC is required by public law to test major systems before they are fielded to its ultimate customer — the American Soldier.

OTC’s Mission Command Test Directorate tests systems for a net-centric environment that will process and transmit voice, data, messaging and video information through networks at the tactical, operational, strategic and sustaining base levels.

Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center Public Affairs

FORT HOOD, Texas – Fort Hood soldiers will get their turn to receive the COVID-19 vaccine when two new vaccination sites open Feb. 23.  The Shoemaker Center and the New Equipment Fielding Facility will be the primary locations for active duty COVID -19  vaccinations.

Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center medical teams began administering the vaccine to frontline workers Dec. 15 as a part of the Department of Defense’s initial rollout. Since then, CRDAMC has progressed through the two-phased plan.

The first phase began with frontline workers and first-responders. It was then expanded to include high-risk beneficiaries, mission-essential personnel, and other priority populations. The second phase opens up to healthy populations age 16 years and older.

Active Duty Soldiers are in phase two and now have an opportunity to receive the voluntary vaccination. Fort Hood Soldiers will get more information about obtaining the vaccine through their units.

COVID-19 vaccinations will continue to be available at the Abrams gym site for family members, retirees, and other eligible beneficiaries.

Abrams gym vaccination site located on 62nd Street and Support Avenue is open  from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday.

Beneficiaries can walk-in for a vaccine, or call 254-288-8888 or visit tricareonline.com to schedule an appointment time block.

All Fort Hood vaccine sites will be closed on weekends and Federal holidays.

For more information contact:
Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center
Public Affairs Office
(254) 288-8005
Mikaela Cade, Chief Public Affairs
Fort Hood, TX 76544
mikaela.t.cade.civ@mail.mil

 

FORT HOOD, Texas – The 13th Expeditionary Sustainment Command supported Fort Hood and III Corps’ efforts to assist the local community in recovering from the effects of recent severe weather conditions Feb. 21.

The 553rd Field Feeding Company, 61st Quartermaster Battalion, 13th Expeditionary Sustainment Command, received a request to supply water to the Bell County Jail.  Because of the severe weather, the water pipes burst leaving the facility with no running water.

The 553rd accomplished this not only while operating three Army dining facilities and the Fort Hood Culinary Kiosk seven days a week, despite the weather conditions, but also while most of the team were experiencing water and electricity issues in their own homes.

“I am still staying at a hotel due to my ceiling collapsing from water,” remarked the 553rd Company Commander and Los Angeles native Capt. Abe Rodas.  “When my battalion commander asked me if we could support the request from the Bell County Jail, I knew my company could support it because of past the missions we have completed.”

Within 12 hours of the request, the 553rd had their equipment ready and were prepared to convoy to Belton to provide 1,600 gallons of water.

“When I saw my Soldiers in the motor pool firing up the trucks and getting the water buffalos filled with potable water, I saw it in the way they moved that they were happy to do it,” reflected Rodas.  “This is what we train for and stay ready to deploy for.  I am so proud of what they do daily, and never let them forget it.”

Soldiers from the 1st Medical Brigade also provided short notice support to their partner cities over the frigid weekend, and the support will be crucial for the communities as they recover from the effects of the unprecedented weather.

1st Med. Bde. provided approximately 30 Soldiers and seven water buffalos to the Belton and Temple Fire Departments.  With their efforts 3,000 gallons of drinkable water a day will be available to the areas of the community who need it the most, in the weeks ahead.

Fort Hood and the III Armored Corps are proud to provide support to the community, especially in times of need.  Requests from the surrounding communities are vetted thoroughly through legal channels to ensure all necessary regulations are followed while providing resources to the community.

The 553rd Field Feeding Company, 61st Quartermaster Battalion, 13th Expeditionary Sustainment Command provided the Bell County Jail, whose burst water pipes left the facility with no running water, with 1,600 gallons of potable water following a record-setting winter storm Feb. 21.  U.S. Army photo by Capt. Abe Rodas.

The 553rd Field Feeding Company, 61st Quartermaster Battalion, 13th Expeditionary Sustainment Command provided the Bell County Jail, whose burst water pipes left the facility with no running water, with 1,600 gallons of potable water following a record-setting winter storm Feb. 21.  U.S. Army photo by Capt. Abe Rodas.