Fort Hood News Archive

Story by U.S. Army Lt. Col. Jennifer Bocanegra, 1st Cavalry Division Public Affairs Office

Fort Hood, TX- As the U.S. Army modernizes and reorganizes to meet tomorrow’s challenges including sustained large-scale combat operations (LSCO), 1st Cavalry Division leaders and staff participated in a two day on-site this week to understand the division’s role, as the Army’s first penetration division within the Multi-Domain Operations (MDO) construct which includes simultaneous air, land, maritime, space and cyberspace operations.

The on-site opened with remarks from U.S. Army Europe and Africa commander, Gen. Christopher G. Cavoli, and the III Armored Corps command team, Lt. Gen. Robert P. White and Command Sgt. Maj. Cliff Burgoyne. Through video conferences, these commanders shared insights on current threats and potential future employment of 1CD (America’s First Team) during large scale operations. They also advised the group to change their mindset from brigade-level counterinsurgency operations to a division-centric, high intensity multi-domain fight.

Following these senior leader discussions, 1st Cavalry Division commanding general, Maj. Gen. John Richardson, discussed his own warfighting philosophy based on the Cavalry mindset.

“As a Cavalryman, my warfighting philosophy is predicated on seizing the initiative, attacking and pursuing the enemy relentlessly until it is destroyed,” Richardson said. “Cavalry is a mindset. When I think about this division IN LSCO, I think historically about the role of cavalry on Napoleonic battlefields including the mindset and culture inside Napoleon’s army that allowed for taking prudent risk and seizing opportunities, exploiting weaknesses and executing combined arms engagements. When we look at this division’s role in MDO, this is the type of culture we must foster through our command climate and the mindset we need to adopt.”

During an afternoon session, Army Col. (Retired), John Antal spoke with participants through a video conference about changes in modern warfare including the proliferation of unmanned weapons on today’s battlefield. Antal, who currently serves as a historian and leadership coach, used a case study he compiled on the recent Second Nagonmo-Karabakh War to highlight lessons military leaders should consider in preparation for future conflicts including; understanding the enemy, building the capability to fight in multiple domains and employing decisive methods of engagement.

Antal concluded his presentation with a call to action, “I share this information with you to raise awareness of the changing methods of warfare and impel you to study and act.”

During the second day of the on-site, leaders representing various war-fighting functions including aviation, fires, engineering and intelligence provided presentations on their capabilities and potential challenges with supporting sustained LSCO.

Currently, the First Team is upgrading with the most modern ground combat equipment while leaders at all echelons continue to focus on building a fit, disciplined, well-trained cohesive team that is ready to fight and win. Over the next several years the 1st CAV Division will undergo a force redesign to man, train and equip as the first U.S. Army penetration division. To prepare for this transition, the division headquarters and subordinate units will execute a series of command post and warfighting exercises at various echelons to sharpen the unit’s warfighting capability to maintain a competitive advantage over our adversaries.

Since its inception in 1921, 1CD has repeatedly modernized its equipment, reorganized its formation and led innovative changes to doctrine to respond courageously, audaciously and victoriously during conflicts around the world including World War II, Korea, Vietnam, Desert Storm, Iraq and Afghanistan. Today, the First Team continues to proudly serve point for the Nation while honoring its lineage and history.”

Maj. Gen. John Richardson, commanding general, 1st Cavalry Division, speaks to brigade command teams and staff during a two day on-site Jan. 13 at the Mission Training Complex in fort Hood, Texas. This week the on-site focused on understanding the division’s role, as the Army’s first penetration division within the Multi-Domain Operations (MDO) construct which includes simultaneous air, land, maritime, space and cyberspace operations.
(Photo by U.S. Army Master Sgt .Miriam Espinoza, 1st Cavalry Division Public Affairs Office)
Maj. Gen. John Richardson, commanding general, 1st Cavalry Division, speaks to brigade command teams and staff during a two day on-site Jan. 13 at the Mission Training Complex in fort Hood, Texas. This week the on-site focused on understanding the division’s role, as the Army’s first penetration division within the Multi-Domain Operations (MDO) construct which includes simultaneous air, land, maritime, space and cyberspace operations.
(Photo by U.S. Army Master Sgt .Miriam Espinoza, 1st Cavalry Division Public Affairs Office)

FORT HOOD, Texas – Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center, its primary care clinics, and COVID-19 testing and vaccination sites will modify hours Jan. 14-17 in observance of the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day federal holiday. The hospital remains open every day for emergency services, inpatient care, and labor and delivery services.

Monroe and Bennett Health clinics will be closed Friday, Jan. 14.  Active Duty Service members enrolled to either of those clinics should seek care at Thomas Moore Health clinic.  All other clinics and services will be open.

 COVID-19 Testing Site, located in the east parking structure next to the emergency room

Friday, Jan. 14,

7:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Saturday, Jan. 15

Closed

Sunday – Monday, Jan. 16 – 17

9:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.

 

COVID-19 Vaccination Site, Abrams Gym, Bldg. 23001, 62nd & Support Avenue

Friday, Jan. 14,

8:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Saturday – Monday

Closed

 

Thomas Moore Health Clinic COVID-19 Testing (AD only)

Friday, Jan. 14

6:30 a.m. – 2:30 p.m.

Sat., Jan. 15 – Mon, Jan. 17

Closed

 

Pharmacies

Friday, Jan. 14

Bennett and Monroe pharmacies will be closed

All other pharmacies normal operating hours

Saturday, Jan. 15

Clear Creek PX Pharmacy

9 a.m. – 5 p.m.

All other pharmacies closed

Monday, Jan. 17

All pharmacies closed

 

All CRDAMC clinics, COVI-19 testing and vaccination sites, and pharmacies will resume normal operations on Tuesday, Jan. 18.

TRICARE Prime enrollees with urgent, emergent care needs or COVID-19 symptoms should seek assistant at the CRDAMC Emergency Department.

For questions or concerns about COVID-19, please call the 24 hr. APHN COVID-19 hotline at 254-553-6612.

The Nurse Advice Line is available 24/7 by calling (800) TRICARE or 1- 800- 874-2273, Option 1. Individuals living in the Fort Hood area entitled to military healthcare may talk to registered nurses about urgent health issues, guidance on non-emergency situations, and information about self-care for injuries or illnesses.

Beneficiaries can make or cancel appointments through TRICARE online at www.tricareonline.com or by calling Patient Appointment Service at 254-288-8888. At TRICARE online, you can make and cancel appointments as well as request, pharmacy refills, and access health information like laboratory results, radiology results, and immunization records.

 

FORT HOOD, Texas —The Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 12209 will host an installation ceremony  2 p.m. on Jan. 7 at the Phantom Warrior Center, Bldg. 194 here.

The Post will be the first VFW on an active-duty installation within the United States.

“I’m happy to bring the Services of the VFW to the Soldiers and veterans that live and work on Fort Hood,” said Willie Keller, Post 12209 commander, “Once a soldier always a soldier and the VFW never stops supporting  soldiers.”

Media interested in attending the event should call (254) 291-2317 by 11 a.m. Dec. 7  and meet the public affairs escort at 1 p.m. in the south parking lot of the Marvin Leath Visitor Center.

Story by U.S. Army Master Sgt. Miriam Espinoza, 1st Cavalry Division Public Affairs Office

After the 2021 cancellation due to COVID-19, only its fourth cancellation since it began in 1890, the Rose Parade returned Jan. 1 and the 1st Cavalry Division’s Horse Cavalry Detachment returned to the historic event. Maj. Gen. John B. Richardson, commanding general, and Command Sgt. Maj. Shade S. Munday, division command sergeant major, also made an appearance this year for the 133rd Rose Parade in Pasadena, California.

“For us to have an opportunity to participate in such an American tradition with the Horse Cavalry Detachment means a lot, not only to the Soldiers of the detachment, but also for the division itself,” said Richardson, who participated in the parade for the first time.

The parade passes along a 5 1/2-mile route and it is an iconic New Year’s Day tradition for millions of Americans. Nearly half a million people line the streets to see more than 40 floats decorated with millions of fresh flowers, bands and equestrian units. Millions more watch the parade via live broadcast from the comfort of their homes.

“It’s great to be able to represent 1st CAV and showcase who we are and what we do to the thousands of people who show up,” said Capt. Abigail Edwards, commander, HCD, 1CD.

While on temporary duty in California, the HCD also took part of the 30th Annual Equestfest in Los Angeles, where the detachment performed their mounted demonstration.

“I cannot say enough about the commander, the Soldiers, Non-commissioned Officers, and officers that make up our detachment,” said Richardson. “They do everything first class and today at the parade they just showcased the level of pride that they have not only for their detachment but for the division as a whole.”

The unit started preparing for this event, the biggest of year, 6 months in advance. The 3-day, nearly 1,400-mile trip from Fort Hood, Texas to Pasadena, California requires a significant amount of detailed of planning to ensure horses and personnel arrive safely to their final destination. A total of 21 Soldiers, two veterinarians and a civilian trainer traveled to Pasadena alongside 13 horses and two mules.

“This is the biggest event we do, this is what we look forward to every year, and I could not ask for a better group of Troopers, they have put a lot of work into making this happen and everyone is extremely excited,” said Edwards, who took command of the detachment only a few months ago.

The parade’s first three cancellations happened in 1942, 1943, and 1945 and were all due to World War II. Last year out of an abundance of precaution, the parade was cancelled to prevent the spread of COVID-19.

“I want to showcase our professionalism, and for the American public to know we are the most prestigious horse cavalry detachment in the U.S. Army and I want everyone to see the care that we take in our mounts and the pride that we have in what we do,” said Sgt. 1st Class Michael Hannibal, platoon sergeant, HCD, 1CD.

The detachment has been invited to the parade since 1996 and this year they were the only active duty Army unit invited to the parade.

“I’m always impressed by the Horse Cavalry Detachment’s Troopers and Non-commissioned Officers, their professionalism and dedicating to showcasing our division’s rich history were on full display for the country to see,” said Munday. “It was an honor to be side by side with them during this year’s Rose Parade.”

Maj. Gen. John B. Richardson, commanding general, and Command Sgt. Maj. Shade S. Munday, division command sergeant major, participate in this year for the 133rd Rose Parade Jan. 1 in Pasadena, California. The parade passes along a 5 1/2-mile route and it is an iconic New Year’s Day tradition for millions of Americans. Nearly half a million people line the streets to see more than 40 floats decorated with millions of fresh flowers, bands and equestrian units. Millions more watch the parade via live broadcast from the comfort of their homes. (Photo by U.S. Army Master Sgt. Miriam Espinoza, 1st Cavalry Division Public Affairs Office)
The 1st Cavalry Division’s Horse Cavalry Detachment returns to the historic Rose Parade Jan. in Pasadena, California. The unit started preparing for this event, the biggest of year, 6 months in advance. The 3-day, nearly 1,400-mile trip from Fort Hood, Texas to Pasadena, California requires a significant amount of detailed of planning to ensure horses and personnel arrive safely to their final destination. (Photo by U.S. Army Master Sgt. Miriam Espinoza, 1st Cavalry Division Public Affairs Office)
The 1st Cavalry Division’s Horse Cavalry Detachment returns to the historic Rose Parade Jan. in Pasadena, California. The unit started preparing for this event, the biggest of year, 6 months in advance. The 3-day, nearly 1,400-mile trip from Fort Hood, Texas to Pasadena, California requires a significant amount of detailed of planning to ensure horses and personnel arrive safely to their final destination. (Photo by U.S. Army Master Sgt. Miriam Espinoza, 1st Cavalry Division Public Affairs Office)

 

FORT HOOD, Texas – The Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center, its primary care clinics, and COVID-19 vaccination and testing sites will modify hours 20 Dec – 3 Jan., for the Holiday season. The hospital remains open every day for emergency services, inpatient care, and labor and delivery services.

COVID-19 Vaccination and Testing Sites

Abrams Gym
0800-11:30 Dec., 20-22 & Dec 27-29
Closed Dec., 23-26 and Dec., 30- Jan 2

Respiratory Drive -Thru Clinic
0700-1000 Dec., 20-22 & Dec 27-29
Closed Dec., 23-26 and Dec., & 30- Jan 2

Pharmacies are open Normal Operating Hours
Dec., 20-23 & Dec., 27-30

Monroe and Bennett pharmacies will be closed Dec., 23 and Dec., 30.

All pharmacies will be closed
Dec., 24-26 and Dec., 31- Jan., 2

All CRDAMC clinics and pharmacies will resume normal operations on Monday, Jan. 3, 2022.

TRICARE Prime enrollees with urgent, emergent care needs or COVID-19 symptoms should seek assistant at the CRDAMC Emergency Department.

For questions or concerns about COVID-19, please call the 24 hr. APHN COVID-19 hotline at 254-553-6612.

The Nurse Advice Line is available 24/7 by calling (800) TRICARE or 1- 800- 874-2273, Option 1. Individuals living in the Fort Hood area entitled to military healthcare may talk to registered nurses about urgent health issues, guidance on non-emergency situations, and information about self-care for injuries or illnesses.

Beneficiaries can make or cancel appointments through TRICARE online at www.tricareonline.com or by calling Patient Appointment Service at 254-288-8888. At TRICARE online, you can make and cancel appointments as well as request, pharmacy refills, and access health information like laboratory results, radiology results, and immunization records.

– 30 –

Story by U.S. Army Lt. Col. Jennifer Bocanegra, 1st Cavalry Division Public Affairs

DALLAS, Texas — On Saturday morning the 1st Cavalry Division command team, Maj. Gen. John B. Richardson, commanding general, and Command Sgt. Maj. Shade S. Munday, division command sergeant major, joined thousands of volunteers at the Dallas-Fort Worth National Cemetery to honor fallen heroes and Veterans by laying wreaths at over 40,000 gravesites.

“For the past 12 years, tens of thousands of wreaths have been carefully and respectfully laid at the foot of the gravestones here in honor of the service and sacrifice of each of these Veterans and their families,” Richardson said during his remarks.

Munday also took part in the ceremony by placing a wreath in honor of the U.S. Army near the assembly area alongside wreaths representing the six other branches of military service and prisoners of war.

The ceremony, which was narrated by 1st Lt. Mason Prewitt from the TX-391 Dallas Composite Squadron, Civil Air Patrol, featured a flyover by the Service Air Corps, the singing of the National Anthem and the Irish Blessing by the Good Times Chorus out of Arlington, Texas, and the presentation of the U.S. National Colors by cadets from both the TX 391 and Black Sheep Squadrons, Civil Air Patrol.

National Wreaths Across America Day is held annually mid-December at more than 2,500 locations across the U.S., at sea and abroad with a goal of laying a wreath at the gravesite of each Veteran.

“Every headstone on these grounds represents a single veteran-an American hero-who selflessly served our nation,” Richardson said. “It is your presence that means so much to the families of those whose loved ones rest in peace on these hallowed grounds.”

Maj. Gen. John B. Richardson, 1st Cavalry Division commander, places a wreath at the gravesite of U.S. Army Cpl. Perry J. Jackson at the Dallas-Fort Worth Cemetery on Saturday, Dec. 18. Thousands of volunteers including Gold Star family members came out to the DFW cemetery to lay 48,000 wreaths on the gravesites of fallen service members and Veterans to honor their service and sacrifice.
(U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Broderick Hennington)
Maj. Gen. John B. Richardson, 1st Cavalry Division commander, gives remarks during a wreath-laying event at the Dallas-Fort Worth Cemetery on Saturday, Dec. 18. Thousands of volunteers including Gold Star family members came out to the DFW cemetery to lay 48,000 wreaths on the gravesites of fallen service members and Veterans to honor their service and sacrifice.
(U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Broderick Hennington)
Command Sgt. Maj. Shade S. Munday, 1st Cavalry Division command sergeant major, places a wreath in honor of the U.S. Army alongside wreaths representing the six other branches of military service and prisoners of war near the assembly area at the Dallas-Fort Worth Cemetery. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Broderick Hennington)
The 4th Infantry Division completes set up of a new division tactical operations center in a Fort Carson, Colorado training area during the Command Post Infrastructure Integration (CPI2) test. The design of CPI2 enables a division headquarters to be scalable, modular, and agile while reducing the physical area required of tactical operations. (Photo by Maj. Monty Blamires, Assistant Product Manager, Command Post Integrated Infrastructure)

By Capt. Demetrius L. Spencer, Test Officer, Mission Command Test Directorate, U.S. Army Operational Test Command

FORT CARSON, Colorado — 4th Infantry Division Soldiers just completed testing a new command post structure as part of the Army’s effort to modernize the division headquarters.

“Command Post Infrastructure Integration (CPI2) is the new command post for the division and it replaces the legacy tentage and all of the vehicles and large footprint that a division had before for their main command post,” said Maj. Jordan Funderburk, Plans Officer at the Ironhorse Division.

During the test, CPI2 systems are being evaluated on the time it takes for a division headquarters to emplace, displace, operate and move its command post to support unit missions.

The design of CPI2 enables a division headquarters to be scalable, modular, and agile while reducing the physical area required of tactical operations.

“The CPI2 system does drastically reduce the teardown of the equipment — the former being the large tent where everyone would congregate to one location,” said Maj. Christopher Sullivan, another 4th ID Plans Officer.

CPI2 equipment for a division headquarters come with two variants of workspace shelters, the Mission Command Platform (MCP) and the Command Post Support Vehicle (CPSV), mounted on the Light Medium Tactical Vehicle (LMTV).

The Ironhorse division headquarters conducted a series of tactical movements with the CPI2 equipment, requiring them to take the system out of operation, move to a new location, and re-establish operations.

“Getting these reps in (repetitions of setting up, tearing down, and moving) has helped us develop our tactics, techniques and procedures to make this setup faster and safer,” said Sgt. Maj. Michael Bass, Division Engineer Sergeant Major for the Ivy Division.

Besides tactical movements, the division used components of CPI2 such as the Secure Wireless Mesh Remote Endpoint (SWMRE) and millimeter waveform (mmW).

“From a communications stand point, keeping the servers and the Command Post Support Vehicle (CPSV) in a warm start means that we can have the network up as soon as we drop the trailer,” said Cpl. Jonathan Knowles, a 4th ID communications and information technology Soldier.

“These new shelters definitely help enhance my job,” added Knowles. “(CPI2) gives me the power to focus on and isolate an issue to a single thing, which in turn helps the user, get back to work in the fight. It enables me to get in and out really quickly.”

~~

About the U.S. Army Operational Test Command:

OTC taps the Total Army when testing Army, joint, and multi-service warfighting systems in realistic operational environments, using typical Soldiers to determine whether the systems are effective, suitable, and survivable. OTC is required by public law to test major systems before they are fielded to its ultimate customer — the American Soldier.

OTC’s Mission Command Test Directorate tests systems for a net-centric environment that will process and transmit voice, data, messaging and video information through networks at the tactical, operational, strategic and sustaining base levels.

 

Story by. Capt. Taylor Criswell, 1st Air Cavalry Brigade Public Affairs

ILLESHEIM, Germany–The 1st Combat Aviation Brigade (1CAB), 1st Infantry Division officially cased its colors as they handed over the aviation component of Atlantic Resolve to 1st Air Cavalry Brigade (1ACB), 1st Cavalry Division in an official ceremony held at Illesheim Army Air Base, Germany, Dec. 15, 2021.

Held inside a large aviation hangar, the ceremony backdrop was a monumental U.S. flag reminiscent of the opening scene from “Patton.” U.S. Army division history was on exhibition with the legendary “Big Red One” patch on the fronts of podiums and programs, and, of course, “Cav Hats” and spurs sported by America’s “First Team.”

The Veitshöchheim Army Music Corps, Würzburg supported the ceremony by performing dynamic renditions of the national anthems for Germany and the United States. The musical handshake could not have been more appropriate as it meaningfully painted the unique friendship between both countries.

Only brigade and battalion command teams, including representative leaders, participated in the massed formation of troops. Most of the 1st CAB personnel have already redeployed, and 1ACB is already participating in its first field training event to demonstrate capabilities and readiness.

Maj. Gen. Jeffery Broadwater, deputy commanding general of the recently reactivated V Corps attended the ceremony. The ceremony was hosted by Brig. Gen. Andrew Gainey, deputy commanding general of 1st Infantry Division. Local community partners, both military and civilian, observed as 1CAB leaders cased its colors for ceremonious return to Fort Riley, and “Air Cav” commanders uncased the colors of 1ACB.

“From establishing relationships throughout Europe, to simply building interoperability in all aspects of their mission, the Demon leadership demonstrated excellence in all phases of this deployment,” said Gainey. “To their credit, they executed more than 15,000 flying hours, conducted 12 top-tier exercises in 15 different countries, engaged in continuous live-fire certifications and countless hours of maintenance while overcoming a global pandemic.”

For the past nine months, 1st CAB has been living and training with partner and ally militaries across Europe in countries such as Romania, Estonia, the Netherlands, Poland, and Germany to increase interoperability and enhance an already strong bond. They participated in multiple, multi-national, large-scale exercises such as Saber Junction, Agile Spirit, and Defender 21.

“When I think about these transfer of authority ceremonies, it reminds me of the commitment the United States has to our European allies and partners,” said Col. Jason Arriaga, commander of the 1st Combat Aviation Brigade. “The 1st Infantry Division Soldiers you see in front of you arrived in Europe at the beginning of the year and spent the last nine months training all over the continent; Germany, Latvia, Poland, Estonia, Greece, Bulgaria, and the Netherlands, just to name a few.”

“We depart Europe a well-trained and ready brigade,” said Arriaga.

1st Lt. April Mattos, Adjutant for 1CAB and CH-47 Chinook pilot, said that the “highlight of the rotation for many 1CAB Troopers was Defender 21.” She said the opportunity to work autonomously and truly test mission command was challenging and rewarding. She also described working with other countries and militaries as “a great experience.”

“Air Cav” is no stranger to Illesheim. 1ACB served as the Regionally Aligned Force for Atlantic Resolve in 2018. Ganey said “they know the importance of this mission and are ready to deter aggression against any adversary threatening our NATO allies and partners in Europe.”

“It is great to be here in Europe, especially in Germany where the generosity and warmth of everyone here in Bavaria is unmatched,” said Col. Reggie Harper, commander of 1ACB. “As we take on our mission to deter any who would seek to impose their will on freedom-loving people in Europe and to reassure our allies and partners- my foremost pledge is to remain ready.”

Harper said “we are ready to fly to the sound of guns with and for our friends. When we arrive, we will win – together.”

The conclusion of the event was punctuated by the Veitshöchheim Army Music Corps performing the official division songs, “Big Red One” and “Spirit of the Cav,” with “The Army Song” as the finale.
1ACB will operate primarily out of Germany but will have forward operating stations in other Atlantic Resolve participating countries, such as Greece and Romania. The brigade is aligned under the mission command of the 1st Infantry Division (1ID) Forward. The 1st Cavalry Division Forward preceded 1ID as the mission command element for Atlantic Resolve, transferring authority in July 2021.
Since April 2014, U.S. Army Europe and Africa has led the Department of Defense’s Atlantic Resolve land efforts by rotating units based in the U.S. to Europe. There are four types of U.S. Army Atlantic Resolve rotations – armored, aviation, sustainment task force and division headquarters. Rotational units conduct bilateral, joint and multinational training events across more than a dozen countries. Atlantic Resolve is funded by the European Deterrence Initiative, which enables the U.S. to enhance deterrence, increase readiness and support NATO.

For media queries about Atlantic Resolve, email atlanticresolve@army.mil.
For more information about the 1st Air Cavalry Brigade, please contact Capt. Taylor Criswell, Brigade Public Affairs Officer, at donald.t.criswell.mil@army.mil.

https://www.dvidshub.net/news/411141/1st-combat-aviation-brigade-transfers-authority-1st-air-cavalry-brigade

 

 

Fort Hood is celebrating the grand opening Bath & Body Works at the Clear Creek Exchange Shopping Center. The Fort Hood garrison commander Col. Chad Foster will help the Exchange cut the ribbon on the new store 9 a.m. Dec. 17 here.

The addition of Bath & Body Works is a part of a long-term project to improve the quality of life at Fort Hood. Shopping the Fort Hood Exchange benefits Soldiers and military families as 100% of Exchange earnings support the military community. This will be the second Bath & Body Works in Killeen.

Media interested in attending the event should call (254) 291-2317 by 4 p.m. Dec. 16. On Dec. 17, media should meet the Public Affairs escort at 8:00 a.m. in the south side parking lot of the Marvin Leath Visitor Center.

FORT HOOD, Texas — Humidity and Christmas music filled the air at Hood Stadium Friday during the Trees for Troops event which had soldiers waiting in line beginning at 7:15 a.m.

Trees for Troops provides free Christmas trees during the first weekend of December. Created by the Christmas Spirit Foundation, Trees for Troops has delivered more than 225,000 live Christmas trees to servicemen and women throughout the world. All the trees are grown on tree farms and donated by more than 800 different tree farmers.

The organization donated 940 trees to Fort Hood soldiers and families this year.  The trees are provided, first-come-first-serve, to troops in the ranks of E-1 to E-4 first. If they aren’t all taken, it is opened to E-5 and above.

“This is the least we can do for our Soldiers who protect us everyday, giving them something back to help them celebrate the Christmas season,” Monty Campbell, sports specialist with the Fort Hood Directorate of Family and Morale, Welfare & Recreation.

This year’s trees were all tagged with a personal message through the FedEx Tag-a-Tree campaign. They asked people using social media platforms to use #TreesforTroops to send a message to the troops receiving a tree, adding a personal touch to each delivery.

Spc. Christian Thorpe, 2nd Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division, smiles alongside his wife Lisa and their baby Tristan during the Trees for Troops event at Hood Stadium Dec. 10. (U.S. Army photo by Brandy Cruz, Fort Hood Public Affairs.)
Spc. Rafael Sanchez, 2nd Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division, smiles as he selects his Christmas tree during the Trees for Troops event at Hood Stadium Dec. 10. (U.S. Army photo by Brandy Cruz, Fort Hood Public Affairs.)
Spc. Ethan Owens, 2nd Battalion, 5th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division, carries a freshly cut Christmas tree to his car, Dec. 10 during the Trees for Troops event at Hood Stadium. (U.S. Army photo by Brandy Cruz, Fort Hood Public Affairs.)